EMBaguette
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#1
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#1
I'm doing some research for my EPQ and I would love to hear from some actual forensic scientists or someone studying it at a degree level. The basic form of the question is: is it possible to use forensic science, not to catch a killer, but to commit a perfect murder? or What is the perfect murder? Do you think it's possible? why or why not?
Could you point me into the direction of some trusted research I could reference?
Literally anything you say I will find helpful
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bones-mccoy
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Hi, I studied Forensic Chemistry at undergrad.

I don't think it is possible to commit the perfect murder, simply based on Locard's exchange principle - every contact leaves a trace. So if the perpetrator of a crime picked touched anything at a crime scene, traces of the item would end up on their hands, and traces from their hands would end up on the item. The advancement of forensic techniques has meant that we now have very sophisticated tests which can pick up DNA, fibres, bodily fluids, and other trace evidence in minute quantities, and be able to analyse them.

You could also look at the question from another perspective - could the "perfect murder" actually be one in which the perpatrator is caught, but the legal case is found unsafe or overturned for whatever reason? The killer would be known, but face no punishment. Thus, the perfect murder.

You might want to ask in other areas of the forum btw, your Q is more forensic science based than psychology based
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 2 years ago
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EMBaguette
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#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by bones-mccoy)
Hi, I studied Forensic Chemistry at undergrad.

I don't think it is possible to commit the perfect murder, simply based on Locard's exchange principle - every contact leaves a trace. So if the perpetrator of a crime picked touched anything at a crime scene, traces of the item would end up on their hands, and traces from their hands would end up on the item. The advancement of forensic techniques has meant that we now have very sophisticated tests which can pick up DNA, fibres, bodily fluids, and other trace evidence in minute quantities, and be able to analyse them.

You could also look at the question from another perspective - could the "perfect murder" actually be one in which the perpatrator is caught, but the legal case is found unsafe or overturned for whatever reason? The killer would be known, but face no punishment. Thus, the perfect murder.

You might want to ask in other areas of the forum btw, your Q is more forensic science based than psychology based
Thank you what other forums would you recommend?
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bones-mccoy
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#4
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(Original post by EMBaguette)
Thank you what other forums would you recommend?
Oh still this forum but different areas of it, you're more likely to find forensic students in the 'biology, biochemistry and other life sciences' part of the STEM help area, maybe even the "society" part too
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