RobElliot
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I always see bristol and imperial top engineering tables but what about other specialised unis like Sheffield, Southampton, leeds, bath etc who have the same high entry grades but are rated lower? I always thought that high entry grades were high for a reason...
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ajj2000
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For many the courses the stated (high) required grades are only high because people think that the better courses are those that demand higher grades, and that a course which asks for, say, ABB can't be a top one. In reality many courses accept lots of people with lower grades.
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v1ctorvoorh33s
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In Malaysian campus of Nottingham, you can get into a mechanical engineering MEng with BBB or even lower so...
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by RobElliot)
I always see bristol and imperial top engineering tables but what about other specialised unis like Sheffield, Southampton, leeds, bath etc who have the same high entry grades but are rated lower? I always thought that high entry grades were high for a reason...
Oxford is top for more general Engineering, even without my bias
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LuigiMario
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Strathclyde, worth a look (tho' my engineer friends who studied there say they should rather have done financial engineering)
I agree that Oxford uni is good, my engineer friends from there, some are working in British science, oh and one is now a lawyer in NZ with an MBA
Imperial, according to Paxman on uni challenge, are busy building the Death Star - but they rejected all my friends who wished to engineer there
One friend studied engineering at ÈPFL Lausanne, but left after a year as no-one talked to him, he went to KGU in Osaka instead

I think the top twenty or even top 40 UK engineering schools will all do a great job, and I'm sure that people will talk to you, also I consider all entry grades this and maybe next year as BC entry grades, Before Coronavirus-19, something might change due the expected dearth of overseas applicants.
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v1ctorvoorh33s
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Strathclyde, worth a look (tho' my engineer friends who studied there say they should rather have done financial engineering)
I agree that Oxford uni is good, my engineer friends from there, some are working in British science, oh and one is now a lawyer in NZ with an MBA
Imperial, according to Paxman on uni challenge, are busy building the Death Star - but they rejected all my friends who wished to engineer there
One friend studied engineering at ÈPFL Lausanne, but left after a year as no-one talked to him, he went to KGU in Osaka instead

I think the top twenty or even top 40 UK engineering schools will all do a great job, and I'm sure that people will talk to you, also I consider all entry grades this and maybe next year as BC entry grades, Before Coronavirus-19, something might change due the expected dearth of overseas applicants.
Can you tell me more about your friend who studied at EPFL? I'm curious because EPFL and ETH Zurich are the world's best technical universities and their graduates should certainly be admired a lot anywhere in the world. I'm considering studying computer science there myself.
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RobElliot
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I dont know how much I can trust league tables you see, I have the option of doing engineering at durham, which seems prestigious but when i tell people about it they didnt even know that durham did engineering. or I could do a gap year and apply to bristol or imperial, or even oxford, schools renowned for the subject. I want to be able to go to a different country afterwards and for people to recognise my university.
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LuigiMario
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(Original post by V1ct0r)
Can you tell me more about your friend who studied at EPFL? I'm curious because EPFL and ETH Zurich are the world's best technical universities and their graduates should certainly be admired a lot anywhere in the world. I'm considering studying computer science there myself.
ETH (Ay Tay Hah) is the best! and you can nip to the zoo or FIFA whenever you have a spare minute, however, you'd be unlikely to have a spare Swiss franc, as Zeurich is so expensive. my friend who is still at ETH is very happy with their teaching, (she is German mother-tongue), says they have iPad compatible slides of all lectures online just after the teaching, so it is relatively easy to read further at home.

Ècole Polytechnique, on the other hand - there were no accommodations available, nowt, so my mate had to stay in a hotel for 3 months, in Switzerland!
To save costs he returned home every weekend. Hence had no social life there. Many students at EPFL studied at high school together, so they were a bit cliquey, Swiss aren't really that open to foreigners. It was OK, but you just need to have the right nerd mentality.

Comp sci, I met the prof there at epfl, he was great, and bowed when I mentioned I was a mate of TimBL. We had a long chat.

Comp sci students at epfl can join the computer club, mend all the other students laptops etc, and get paid real Swiss wages whilst doing it.

but remember comp sci is mostly maths

it's a fun place EPFL, I'd personally prefer to study in Geneva
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v1ctorvoorh33s
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
ETH (Ay Tay Hah) is the best! and you can nip to the zoo or FIFA whenever you have a spare minute, however, you'd be unlikely to have a spare Swiss franc, as Zeurich is so expensive. my friend who is still at ETH is very happy with their teaching, (she is German mother-tongue), says they have iPad compatible slides of all lectures online just after the teaching, so it is relatively easy to read further at home.

Ècole Polytechnique, on the other hand - there were no accommodations available, nowt, so my mate had to stay in a hotel for 3 months, in Switzerland!
To save costs he returned home every weekend. Hence had no social life there. Many students at EPFL studied at high school together, so they were a bit cliquey, Swiss aren't really that open to foreigners. It was OK, but you just need to have the right nerd mentality.

Comp sci, I met the prof there at epfl, he was great, and bowed when I mentioned I was a mate of TimBL. We had a long chat.

Comp sci students at epfl can join the computer club, mend all the other students laptops etc, and get paid real Swiss wages whilst doing it.

but remember comp sci is mostly maths

it's a fun place EPFL, I'd personally prefer to study in Geneva
Is it hard to get into ETH and EPFL? I'm on track to get a 2:1 in electronic engineering and I have experience with writing python-based computer vision and machine learning program and embedded system development in an autonomous vehicle. I also volunteer as a code club teacher at oxford hub. And I'm gonna prepare for GRE after graduation.

I fear that I might get rejected cuz my subject is not computer science and I'm not from a top university; I'm from oxford brookes. I love maths and programming a lot and my aim is to be a video game developer
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Muttley79
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(Original post by RobElliot)
I always see bristol and imperial top engineering tables but what about other specialised unis like Sheffield, Southampton, leeds, bath etc who have the same high entry grades but are rated lower? I always thought that high entry grades were high for a reason...
What sort of Engineering? Do you want to work in industry? in Formula 1?

The best unis offer a year in Industry and tend to be outside the RG group - Bath, Loughborough and Oxford Brookes are ones to look at. Entry grades aren't that relevant these days - Engineering has changed a lot on the last 5 to 10 years. I've seen a huge shift in that time of where my best students apply ...
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RobElliot
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(Original post by Muttley79)
What sort of Engineering? Do you want to work in industry? in Formula 1?

The best unis offer a year in Industry and tend to be outside the RG group - Bath, Loughborough and Oxford Brookes are ones to look at. Entry grades aren't that relevant these days - Engineering has changed a lot on the last 5 to 10 years. I've seen a huge shift in that time of where my best students apply ...
I've applied to mechanical and general engineering courses as I dont want to limit my options for different jobs. Mechanical is my most preferred discipline but I'd say the ideal field to work in would be one that included multidisciplinary roles and one that is at the forefront of innovation. Working alongside industry is obviously very important but I also want to assure that my hard work to get good grades was worthwhile, to exclude the thought that I could have put in less effort but that's just a personal thing. I'm probably going to firm Durham for its general prestige but I am unaware if it's got engineering prestige?
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v1ctorvoorh33s
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(Original post by RobElliot)
I've applied to mechanical and general engineering courses as I dont want to limit my options for different jobs. Mechanical is my most preferred discipline but I'd say the ideal field to work in would be one that included multidisciplinary roles and one that is at the forefront of innovation. Working alongside industry is obviously very important but I also want to assure that my hard work to get good grades was worthwhile, to exclude the thought that I could have put in less effort but that's just a personal thing. I'm probably going to firm Durham for its general prestige but I am unaware if it's got engineering prestige?
I would strongly advice to stay away from Durham if you want to do engineering. I've seen a lot of engineering students at Durham complaining about how lectures are not interesting, lecturers are not engaging and how support is not given.

If you want to get into a university with high entry requirements, I'd recommend Bath. They ask for A*AA for Meng Mechanical engineering and they are also very well represented in industry. You might also want to have a look at Bristol and Manchester but Bath is better in industry.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by RobElliot)
I've applied to mechanical and general engineering courses as I dont want to limit my options for different jobs. Mechanical is my most preferred discipline but I'd say the ideal field to work in would be one that included multidisciplinary roles and one that is at the forefront of innovation. Working alongside industry is obviously very important but I also want to assure that my hard work to get good grades was worthwhile, to exclude the thought that I could have put in less effort but that's just a personal thing. I'm probably going to firm Durham for its general prestige but I am unaware if it's got engineering prestige?
Durham isn't somewhere to go for Engineering ... remember offer grades are a minimum and I've know 4A*s go to all the unis I named.

From your list I'd go with Bath.
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LuigiMario
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(Original post by V1ct0r)
Is it hard to get into ETH and EPFL? I'm on track to get a 2:1 in electronic engineering and I have experience with writing python-based computer vision and machine learning program and embedded system development in an autonomous vehicle. I also volunteer as a code club teacher at oxford hub. And I'm gonna prepare for GRE after graduation.

I fear that I might get rejected cuz my subject is not computer science and I'm not from a top university; I'm from oxford brookes. I love maths and programming a lot and my aim is to be a video game developer
For a bachelor entry, ÈPFL would best suit a UK student (approximately, in my informed opinion) who’s doing Maths A level, Physics A level, and French at A level, and a Further Maths A level would help too! They teach some English, some French mixed courses - eg Environmental Engineering, but they “laugh” at les matematiqes Anglo-sassone, French maths is harder. It really is.
It’s a struggle, for first six-months, but they do have extra modules to help a bit.

In common with some other unis, nearly all Engineering courses have the same first year - so you can specialise later.

If you haven’t yet got great French, then applying for a Master - taught in English, makes more sense. MSc at ÈPFL is competitive entry, as typically they PAY the student to do the Master, somewhere round €15K, CHF16K.

Dundee is a great engineering school for imagineers, Abertay too has close industry ties.
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v1ctorvoorh33s
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
For a bachelor entry, ÈPFL would best suit a UK student (approximately, in my informed opinion) who’s doing Maths A level, Physics A level, and French at A level, and a Further Maths A level would help too! They teach some English, some French mixed courses - eg Environmental Engineering, but they “laugh” at les matematiqes Anglo-sassone, French maths is harder. It really is.
It’s a struggle, for first six-months, but they do have extra modules to help a bit.

In common with some other unis, nearly all Engineering courses have the same first year - so you can specialise later.

If you haven’t yet got great French, then applying for a Master - taught in English, makes more sense. MSc at ÈPFL is competitive entry, as typically they PAY the student to do the Master, somewhere round €15K, CHF16K.

Dundee is a great engineering school for imagineers, Abertay too has close industry ties.
I'm going to apply for masters and are you sure that they 'pay' you to do MSc? I don't see anywhere that you will literally get paid to do a masters. I think it will be for research PhD?

EDIT: the msc which pays is actually called research scholars msc, which looks competitive. I'm just willing to apply for a regular MSc which has some tuition fees.
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RobElliot
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Durham isn't somewhere to go for Engineering ... remember offer grades are a minimum and I've know 4A*s go to all the unis I named.

From your list I'd go with Bath.
Really interesting to see this common answer as everyone recommended durham to me. I regret my choices as I got rejected from bristol and have warwick loughborough Birmingham and durham left which dont really appeal to me, while there is a chance to use ucas extra for sheffield, bath (mechanical and electrical degree) or Southampton. But hearing this I kind of want to do a 180 and take a gap year to reapply to said recommended universities. Cheers for the pointers👍
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artful_lounger
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Southampton is considered one of the best unis for engineering - which is why relying on league tables can easily be misleading. More to the point, literally nobody except school leavers read or care about league tables, and no employers will know (or care) about league table rankings. Other very strong engineering departments at Strathclyde and Heriot-Watt, both of which are heavily targeted by recruiters, are also usually not perceived as prestigious or rank as highly on league tables.
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v1ctorvoorh33s
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(Original post by RobElliot)
Really interesting to see this common answer as everyone recommended durham to me. I regret my choices as I got rejected from bristol and have warwick loughborough Birmingham and durham left which dont really appeal to me, while there is a chance to use ucas extra for sheffield, bath (mechanical and electrical degree) or Southampton. But hearing this I kind of want to do a 180 and take a gap year to reapply to said recommended universities. Cheers for the pointers👍
One rule I always keep in mind when it comes to choosing a university for engineering is to avoid academic and/or ancient universities, for example, Durham, St Andrews (they don't offer engineering at all), King's College. From your list, loughborough is very good and Warwick is becoming more well known due to Warwick Manufacturing Group.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by RobElliot)
Really interesting to see this common answer as everyone recommended durham to me. I regret my choices as I got rejected from bristol and have warwick loughborough Birmingham and durham left which dont really appeal to me, while there is a chance to use ucas extra for sheffield, bath (mechanical and electrical degree) or Southampton. But hearing this I kind of want to do a 180 and take a gap year to reapply to said recommended universities. Cheers for the pointers👍
Southampton is also good -
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LuigiMario
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(Original post by V1ct0r)
I'm going to apply for masters and are you sure that they 'pay' you to do MSc? I don't see anywhere that you will literally get paid to do a masters. I think it will be for research PhD?

EDIT: the msc which pays is actually called research scholars msc, which looks competitive. I'm just willing to apply for a regular MSc which has some tuition fees.
Ok, it is a great college, well worth the hassle of applying , beautiful - if hilly - location.
The sheer quality of Swiss educational establishments has to be seen, and Evian in France is a quick boat ride away over Lac Lèman, stunning, if you need a change of scenery, and a cheap weekend. A bit bureaucratic doing the installation in CH, couldn’t get a comune residence document as had no permanent address, and the rental companies wouldn’t treat/accept your dossier for a house rental until you had the comune residence. (Was solved by sub renting a room, hence real address from some British doctoral students who were away for a year) Masters students can have ÈPFL housing, from their own spin-off housing association) so might be better.


Forgot to mention, the best reason for a Masters in Switzerland - it’s an entry into Swiss employment, many jobs in Engineering, starting near €75K, can easily earn > 100K €\£\CHF after a decade.


When I worked at CERN, we took all our engineering students for work in the Proton Synchrotron & anti-matter accumulator rings from Bath uni, I was never certain why, took a couple every year, for an industrial year.

Now I’m in a different research centre, my fourth, and I concur with Loughborough as being great for engineering, I personally also enjoyed some time at Warwick. I’m not sure that a gap-year is helpful to maintain maths skills?
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