OgoM
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So I'm currently stressed out about what A-Level options to pick so that I am able to do the courses I'd like at university. I'm very interested in becoming an actor but I also like the idea of being a forensic scientist too. As you can see these are very different career paths. The A-Level options I've picked are Chemistry,Biology and Spanish but I don't want to change the Spanish option because it's something that I really enjoy. I've heard that it's useful to have an English Literature or Drama A-Level to be able to do a drama course at university. I did Drama at GCSE and I enjoyed it. I have been told that I don't need to take drama at A-Level to become an actor. I just want to make the best possible choice for me.
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jessblackburn
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By the looks of it its best to have an English or essay subject at A Level for Drama - is it possible to take all four for a few months and drop one? I found that Chemistry at A Level was very different to that at GCSE. I also self-study Spanish from A Level content and the step up I found quite large. That way, you can keep your options open until you have a clearer idea of what each subject is about.
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jadlewis03
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if you chose a levels that you don't like then there is an option to change them after you've tried them. I believe it's for the 1st 6 weeks of the year. biology is a very interesting course, i know this because I am currently doing it. pick what you enjoy, that's what I would recommend but try them first and then you can see if you will enjoy it. hope this helps
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saltandshake
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What course are you thinking of at uni? If your Chemistry & Biology A-Levels satisfy the course requirements, I'd strongly suggest that you stick with the options you picked (+ Spanish). A word of advice though- I wouldn't recommend a forensic science degree; I'd advise you did a degree in a science instead, e.g. perhaps biology, biochemistry, biomedical science, chemistry etc. The forensic science field is highly competitive- some sort of science degree could potentially prepare you better for the job, and moreover provide a safety net should it not work out. Drama A-Level will (generally) make you less competitive for these kinds of degrees, so I'd warn against it.

In terms of potential entry to drama school- as you've said, Drama A-Level (or any other A-Level) is not required for a drama course in the same way that the sciences are required for a degree in forensic science/any other science. Given your indecision, it's worth keeping your options open and sticking with the A-Levels you've chosen. Dropping Drama will not affect your future options in the same way that dropping the sciences will; you could switch Spanish for Drama, but it sounds like Spanish is a non-negotiable (and anyway, would be a much more valuable A-Level than Drama in terms of employability).

Do bear in mind also that only 2% of actors earn enough to make a living - it's almost inevitable that you'd be in the 98% for most, if not all, of your acting career. If you decide that acting is the route you want to go down, it's vital you have some sort of solid degree to support yourself. Given your interest in science, it'd be a bit insane to throw that degree away.
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OgoM
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(Original post by jadlewis03)
if you chose a levels that you don't like then there is an option to change them after you've tried them. I believe it's for the 1st 6 weeks of the year. biology is a very interesting course, i know this because I am currently doing it. pick what you enjoy, that's what I would recommend but try them first and then you can see if you will enjoy it. hope this helps
Thank you for responding I just think with all this coronavirus panic, I'm getting a little stressed about the future and it's uncertainty but thank you very much
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chi2
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To be honest you don't really need a drama degree to become an actor, some may go to drama school but not all. Joining a uni drama society is probably your best way to fulfil what you want with acting, while still having a degree that can lead to a different career if you choose that path. It will give you much more choice for the future!
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OgoM
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(Original post by saltandshake)
What course are you thinking of at uni? If your Chemistry & Biology A-Levels satisfy the course requirements, I'd strongly suggest that you stick with the options you picked (+ Spanish). A word of advice though- I wouldn't recommend a forensic science degree; I'd advise you did a degree in a science instead, e.g. perhaps biology, biochemistry, biomedical science, chemistry etc. The forensic science field is highly competitive- some sort of science degree could potentially prepare you better for the job, and moreover provide a safety net should it not work out. Drama A-Level will (generally) make you less competitive for these kinds of degrees, so I'd warn against it.

In terms of potential entry to drama school- as you've said, Drama A-Level (or any other A-Level) is not required for a drama course in the same way that the sciences are required for a degree in forensic science/any other science. Given your indecision, it's worth keeping your options open and sticking with the A-Levels you've chosen. Dropping Drama will not affect your future options in the same way that dropping the sciences will; you could switch Spanish for Drama, but it sounds like Spanish is a non-negotiable (and anyway, would be a much more valuable A-Level than Drama in terms of employability).

Do bear in mind also that only 2% of actors earn enough to make a living - it's almost inevitable that you'd be in the 98% for most, if not all, of your acting career. If you decide that acting is the route you want to go down, it's vital you have some sort of solid degree to support yourself. Given your interest in science, it'd be a bit insane to throw that degree away.
Thank you so much, your response was really helpful and I definitely feel a lot more secure in my choices now. Thanks again!
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OgoM
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(Original post by jessblackburn)
By the looks of it its best to have an English or essay subject at A Level for Drama - is it possible to take all four for a few months and drop one? I found that Chemistry at A Level was very different to that at GCSE. I also self-study Spanish from A Level content and the step up I found quite large. That way, you can keep your options open until you have a clearer idea of what each subject is about.
Thank you for taking the time to reply and give me advice. It's very much appreciated.
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OgoM
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(Original post by chi2)
To be honest you don't really need a drama degree to become an actor, some may go to drama school but not all. Joining a uni drama society is probably your best way to fulfil what you want with acting, while still having a degree that can lead to a different career if you choose that path. It will give you much more choice for the future!
Thank you so much, that's given me a bit more hope
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Navy_Blue
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(Original post by OgoM)
So I'm currently stressed out about what A-Level options to pick so that I am able to do the courses I'd like at university. I'm very interested in becoming an actor but I also like the idea of being a forensic scientist too. As you can see these are very different career paths. The A-Level options I've picked are Chemistry,Biology and Spanish but I don't want to change the Spanish option because it's something that I really enjoy. I've heard that it's useful to have an English Literature or Drama A-Level to be able to do a drama course at university. I did Drama at GCSE and I enjoyed it. I have been told that I don't need to take drama at A-Level to become an actor. I just want to make the best possible choice for me.
Hey
I've picked the same A-level subjects, I'm currently finishing Y12. I picked Spanish as my "Happy subject" because I was told that Chemistry and Biology are very challenging, and I previously studied in Spain so I had no clue what to expect from the English system.

My Spanish group agrees with the fact that there is a huge jump between GCSE and A-level content. There are more case studies, you will learn about different topics more in detail and you will have to learn about a lot on Hispanic tradition and culture. You will also have to study a film and a book. For us the film is /María, eres llena de gracia/ and the book is /Cómo Agua Para Chocolate/ If you choose to stay with Spanish there will also be a massive amount of grammar too. You are expected to talk-talk-talk and talk, you are expected to become a good speaker, but don't worry, I'm sure your teachers will show you how to do so

You seem passionate about studying the language so if you kind of like the above-mentioned topics I'm pretty sure you will enjoy and love sixth form Spanish. Good luck!!!
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