Is InsideSherpa legal work experience worth the effort?

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username5266892
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Hi

I hope to attend university in September to study law. My work experience at a law firm has been cancelled. I recently heard about InsideSherpa offering legal work experience, however as it is virtual I am not sure if it will be useful for my CV.

What do you think? Can I please ask for some guidance here? Is it worth the effort to sign up for this virtual experience?

Thanks
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LeslieNOPE
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
Hi

I hope to attend university in September to study law. My work experience at a law firm has been cancelled. I recently heard about InsideSherpa offering legal work experience, however as it is virtual I am not sure if it will be useful for my CV.

What do you think?
Thanks
It's backed by Linklaters and seems to be fairly decent. Definitely won't hurt if you don't have much else to do while in quarantine.
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username5266892
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(Original post by LeslieNOPE)
It's backed by Linklaters and seems to be fairly decent. Definitely won't hurt if you don't have much else to do while in quarantine.
I saw that! I am also worried that they might collect data of our work and I know absolutely nothing about law. I don't want to do something I don't have the right knowledge for, if that makes sense. Don't want to appear foolish.
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username5266892
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Has anyone done one of the programmes? Would you recommend it or not?
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Varis
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I cannot imagine (based on actual vacation scheme experience) that you'll be given tasks that are out of your depth. I think it's definitely worth it, even if it is just for the knowledge / experience. It would also be a good idea to do other offerings available on InsideSherpa, even if they are not strictly law related as you will have a lot of time now, and it will give you a more holistic understanding of the different industries.
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LeslieNOPE
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
I saw that! I am also worried that they might collect data of our work and I know absolutely nothing about law. I don't want to do something I don't have the right knowledge for, if that makes sense. Don't want to appear foolish.
It's designed to be accessible to people who haven't studied law so I wouldn't worry about it. It's more business/current affairs/common sense and it's usually a video tutorial/reading through the material and then doing an exercise. I would give it a go! It is quite thorough and time consuming but very very well done. I didn't have enough time to really commit but I'd encourage you to try it. AFAIK Linklaters don't check the data like that but if you mentioned it in your application, they'd probably ask what you did/what you learned etc.
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username5266892
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(Original post by Varis)
I cannot imagine (based on actual vacation scheme experience) that you'll be given tasks that are out of your depth. I think it's definitely worth it, even if it is just for the knowledge / experience. It would also be a good idea to do other offerings available on InsideSherpa, even if they are not strictly law related as you will have a lot of time now, and it will give you a more holistic understanding of the different industries.
Thank you for your response.

Perfect. I will look for other courses available. Aside from being useful purely because you gain knowledge, do you think it adds value to one's CV? There are no requirements for the course, so practically anyone 18+ can sign up.
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username5266892
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(Original post by LeslieNOPE)
It's designed to be accessible to people who haven't studied law so I wouldn't worry about it. It's more business/current affairs/common sense and it's usually a video tutorial/reading through the material and then doing an exercise. I would give it a go! It is quite thorough and time consuming but very very well done. I didn't have enough time to really commit but I'd encourage you to try it. AFAIK Linklaters don't check the data like that but if you mentioned it in your application, they'd probably ask what you did/what you learned etc.
Thank you! Have you done the virtual programmes or you speaking from real life experience?
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Johnny ~
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There are lots of virtual vac schemes, if my Linkedin feed is any indication. :rolleyes:

If you have nothing better to do with your time, sure, give it a go. Most people seem to be doing more than one in parallel. It's clearly not a competency-generating event like a regular vac scheme where you're given some substantive tasks, but it's better than not engaging.

Given how many people are doing these schemes, I wouldn't expect it to stand out on a CV by the time life gets back to normal.
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username5266892
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
There are lots of virtual vac schemes, if my Linkedin feed is any indication. :rolleyes:

If you have nothing better to do with your time, sure, give it a go. Most people seem to be doing more than one in parallel. It's clearly not a competency-generating event like a regular vac scheme where you're given some substantive tasks, but it's better than not engaging.

Given how many people are doing these schemes, I wouldn't expect it to stand out on a CV by the time life gets back to normal.
In that case, I think I will do one or two just out of interest. Ideally, I want the real thing. I saw law students mocking the virtual work experience schemes on Legal Cheek so I thought that perhaps there were other issues with these programmes besides not being offered based on competency. Thank you.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
In that case, I think I will do one or two just out of interest. Ideally, I want the real thing. I saw law students mocking the virtual work experience schemes on Legal Cheek so I thought that perhaps there were other issues with these programmes besides not being offered based on competency. Thank you.
Legal Cheek and its commenters are trash Don't listen to them

You're at a stage where you should be worried more about figuring out what is right for you than building up hard competencies (though the latter obviously does matter). I'm guessing that any snide remarks were directed to older candidates who do have more opportunities to get 'real' work experience.
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username5266892
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
Legal Cheek and its commenters are trash Don't listen to them

You're at a stage where you should be worried more about figuring out what is right for you than building up hard competencies (though the latter obviously does matter). I'm guessing that any snide remarks were directed to older candidates who do have more opportunities to get 'real' work experience.
I only read the comments to amuse myself.

What do you mean by "hard competencies"?
Yes, the comments were meant to belittle other university students. I never comment on LC, though not because I haven't tried to get creative. Boredom does things to you.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
I only read the comments to amuse myself.

What do you mean by "hard competencies"?
Yes, the comments were meant to belittle other university students. I never comment on LC, though not because I haven't tried to get creative. Boredom does things to you.
Competencies are situations where you've demonstrated a certain skill or the ability to respond to a certain event. You will almost certainly be asked for a couple at interview. All successful applicants that I know have a very long list of these written down somewhere.

'Real', physical, face-to-face work experience can help you develop some of these competencies. For example, you may find yourself in a situation where you're delivering work to a tight deadline, or where you're facing harsh feedback, or where you're presenting something to a group of people, or where you're leading a project.

The problem with virtual vac schemes (as I understand them - never done one) is that you don't get to do things that can be used as competencies.

(Edit: I should say that, as a first year undergrad, you will still need to have a list of competencies at hand for your applications to first year schemes, but these can be taken from your extracurriculars at school or uni or from any other work experience that you have done. Doing a vac scheme virtually isn't necessary.)
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username5266892
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
Competencies are situations where you've demonstrated a certain skill or the ability to respond to a certain event. You will almost certainly be asked for a couple at interview. All successful applicants that I know have a very long list of these written down somewhere.

'Real', physical, face-to-face work experience can help you develop some of these competencies. For example, you may find yourself in a situation where you're delivering work to a tight deadline, or where you're facing harsh feedback, or where you're presenting something to a group of people, or where you're leading a project.

The problem with virtual vac schemes (as I understand them - never done one) is that you don't get to do things that can be used as competencies.

(Edit: I should say that, as a first year undergrad, you will still need to have a list of competencies at hand for your applications to first year schemes, but these can be taken from your extracurriculars at school or uni or from any other work experience that you have done. Doing a vac scheme virtually isn't necessary.)
Yes, precisely! Alright, thank you ever so much for your advice.
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username5266892
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A general question: at the end of each module you are required to submit your work. Is anyone at the firm going to have a look? lol I am going to try, I just don't know if I really, really need to try if that makes sense haha
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LeslieNOPE
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
Thank you for your response.

Perfect. I will look for other courses available. Aside from being useful purely because you gain knowledge, do you think it adds value to one's CV? There are no requirements for the course, so practically anyone 18+ can sign up.
I've actually signed up and done some of the Linklaters course- it's not a multiple choice type thing that you can cycle through quickly, you do actually have to put in the time and you receive marks for the tasks you complete. Personally, it exceeded my expectations for how thorough and well put together I thought it would be. Also, you will build up a lot of skills doing it- skills which help with assessment centres to actually get a vac scheme, which is a competitive process in and of itself.

At the end of the day, LegalCheek is just a blog and most of the people sneering don't even have training contract lined up themselves. Given the pandemic, I have lots of colleagues who had 'real' vac scheme offers which are now going to be conducted entirely online. I really wouldn't sneer at this opportunity to build up some experience. Lots of candidates will have done research on firms and have a whole CV of extracurricular activities, fewer will have put in the time to actually gain the kind of skills and knowledge you need to get through an assessment centre and score a vac scheme, which is ultimately your route to a training contract. As I've said, it's highly unlikely that Linklaters is tracking who has signed up and cross checking against the 1000s of applicants who apply to them, I really can't see what you have to lose by signing up and seeing what you can get out of it.
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Varis
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
Thank you for your response.

Perfect. I will look for other courses available. Aside from being useful purely because you gain knowledge, do you think it adds value to one's CV? There are no requirements for the course, so practically anyone 18+ can sign up.
To be honest, it'll add very little value normally. However, given COVID19, it'll make you look very productive and even the non-relevant experiences can help. It tends to be more useful if you're applying to a specific firm after having done their specific virtual scheme.
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username5266892
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(Original post by Varis)
To be honest, it'll add very little value normally. However, given COVID19, it'll make you look very productive and even the non-relevant experiences can help. It tends to be more useful if you're applying to a specific firm after having done their specific virtual scheme.
Interesting that firms look at experience in context. It will be good practice, I guess. Thank you, Varis.
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username5266892
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(Original post by LeslieNOPE)
I've actually signed up and done some of the Linklaters course- it's not a multiple choice type thing that you can cycle through quickly, you do actually have to put in the time and you receive marks for the tasks you complete. Personally, it exceeded my expectations for how thorough and well put together I thought it would be. Also, you will build up a lot of skills doing it- skills which help with assessment centres to actually get a vac scheme, which is a competitive process in and of itself.

At the end of the day, LegalCheek is just a blog and most of the people sneering don't even have training contract lined up themselves. Given the pandemic, I have lots of colleagues who had 'real' vac scheme offers which are now going to be conducted entirely online. I really wouldn't sneer at this opportunity to build up some experience. Lots of candidates will have done research on firms and have a whole CV of extracurricular activities, fewer will have put in the time to actually gain the kind of skills and knowledge you need to get through an assessment centre and score a vac scheme, which is ultimately your route to a training contract. As I've said, it's highly unlikely that Linklaters is tracking who has signed up and cross checking against the 1000s of applicants who apply to them, I really can't see what you have to lose by signing up and seeing what you can get out of it.
Thank you so much for replying to me.
A few questions, if you don't mind:

1) Who awards the marks? When we submit our work online, who receives it?
2) It says the 'course' should take around 5-6 hours, all modules included. How long did you spend on it yourself?
3) Are you a law student? What year? Do you think the modules can be easily completed by someone who doesn't know any law?

Thanks!
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farukm2
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(Original post by HopelesslyTrash)
Has anyone done one of the programmes? Would you recommend it or not?
Yes I have I did the accenture consulting program and it was really enjoyable i am going to do another one soon maybe the kpmg one it has a wide array of choices if anyone does any dm me I'd like to build up my portfolio and get connections : ) also it isnt just law on there so check out ones u wanna do i found some on auditing, technology and software engineering.
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