If resources are plentiful, how does Intraspecific competition exist ?

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lhh2003
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Take a rabbit population,

If space and food are plentiful, then each rabbit has more than it needs to survive and it can successfully reproduce at an increased rate.

So the population size goes up, and so on, until resources are not in excess.

At this point, the population starts to decrease as some organisms miss out.

But why does my textbook say that there is infraspecific competition for resources even when the resources are well in excess (I understand why it might start to occur when the resources are only slightly in excess, but surely it is effectively non-existent when just as the curve starts to increase from the carrying capacity ?
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Ensorcell
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Textbooks generally simplify things and in an exam you’ll have to assume there is a limit on the number of resources, or else it would be a very complicated question. Also, there’s a difference between access to resources and abundance of resources - e.g. if a population of rabbits all live in burrows along one hedgerow, they’ll still be competing for the resources closest to home so they don’t have to travel as far and leave their young for as long.
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