mohona1827
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Hi guys can someone check this as it is due in tomorrow at midnight?











With the development of the world increasing at a rapid rate, this increases the risk of natural events, for example through urbanisation. Increasing the economic development means many countries are building cities and suburbs, such as Tokyo and Istanbul. However, densely populated areas can increase the impacts of a natural events. This is because the residents are less sparsely spread out unlike in the countryside and therefore if the city is close to the epicentre of the earthquake, more damage can be caused such as buildings collapsing on people, causing a higher number of casualties to be treated. In 2010, the Haiti earthquake killed 230,000 in the capital city, Port-ou-Prince and 200,000 people were injured. The cause of these natural events was due to the mass deforestation occurring in Haiti, mainly for cattle ranches and land use for infrastructure. This would mean less trees to absorb the c02 in the air, and contribute to the greenhouse effect, contributing to climate change. This can cause parts of the world to be wetter and at a higher risk of flooding, while others may suffer droughts due to rising temperatures. Therefore, higher levels of economic development do not always provide.

Moreover, another is agriculture. Many farmers choose to live near prominent zones of a natural event as they are benefited for their crops, such as minerals form the volcanoes caused by the weathering of igneous rocks, provide good crop yields. In addition, with urbanisation, many are forced to live in areas of risk of a natural hazard, such as on a tectonic plate (e.g. Lima) because they are unable to afford a place to live in the city. This means with the shortage of housing they are vulnerable to droughts and famine. In 2002-2009 Murray-Basin, Australia, had suffered a drought that caused the loss of 40% of agriculture and therefore farmers had to move in order to survive. With the lack of food production, Australia had to import foods from other countries.

On the other hand, economic developments can allow countries to plan and protect themselves from this natural event and reduce the outcome of the primary and secondary effects and to make people less vulnerable to these events, through the mitigation and monitoring. An example is in India, 600 cyclone shelters have been built in the aid for 11,000 people to stay and in Chile buildings are being built with concrete and steel frames to withstand the tectonic hazards, protecting families.

In conclusion, higher economic developments can help reduce the number of people being killed by weather events through modern hi-tech equipment and stronger infrastructure, however, I disagree they reduce the chances of a natural event as human activity has caused an impact on the environment for example cars, can contribute to global warming.
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MBa16.
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(Original post by mohona1827)
Hi guys can someone check this as it is due in tomorrow at midnight?











With the development of the world increasing at a rapid rate, this increases the risk of natural events, for example through urbanisation. Increasing the economic development means many countries are building cities and suburbs, such as Tokyo and Istanbul. However, densely populated areas can increase the impacts of a natural events. This is because the residents are less sparsely spread out unlike in the countryside and therefore if the city is close to the epicentre of the earthquake, more damage can be caused such as buildings collapsing on people, causing a higher number of casualties to be treated. In 2010, the Haiti earthquake killed 230,000 in the capital city, Port-ou-Prince and 200,000 people were injured. The cause of these natural events was due to the mass deforestation occurring in Haiti, mainly for cattle ranches and land use for infrastructure. This would mean less trees to absorb the c02 in the air, and contribute to the greenhouse effect, contributing to climate change. This can cause parts of the world to be wetter and at a higher risk of flooding, while others may suffer droughts due to rising temperatures. Therefore, higher levels of economic development do not always provide.

Moreover, another is agriculture. Many farmers choose to live near prominent zones of a natural event as they are benefited for their crops, such as minerals form the volcanoes caused by the weathering of igneous rocks, provide good crop yields. In addition, with urbanisation, many are forced to live in areas of risk of a natural hazard, such as on a tectonic plate (e.g. Lima) because they are unable to afford a place to live in the city. This means with the shortage of housing they are vulnerable to droughts and famine. In 2002-2009 Murray-Basin, Australia, had suffered a drought that caused the loss of 40% of agriculture and therefore farmers had to move in order to survive. With the lack of food production, Australia had to import foods from other countries.

On the other hand, economic developments can allow countries to plan and protect themselves from this natural event and reduce the outcome of the primary and secondary effects and to make people less vulnerable to these events, through the mitigation and monitoring. An example is in India, 600 cyclone shelters have been built in the aid for 11,000 people to stay and in Chile buildings are being built with concrete and steel frames to withstand the tectonic hazards, protecting families.

In conclusion, higher economic developments can help reduce the number of people being killed by weather events through modern hi-tech equipment and stronger infrastructure, however, I disagree they reduce the chances of a natural event as human activity has caused an impact on the environment for example cars, can contribute to global warming.
What mark is it out of and what's the question
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mohona1827
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(Original post by MBa16.)
What mark is it out of and what's the question
it's out of 15 and the question is “As more countries in the world reach higher levels of economic development, fewer people will be killed or injured by extreme weather events.” - How far do you agree with this statement?

I have a max word of 400 and this is GCSE geography (aqa)

thank you!
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MBa16.
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(Original post by mohona1827)
it's out of 15 and the question is “As more countries in the world reach higher levels of economic development, fewer people will be killed or injured by extreme weather events.” - How far do you agree with this statement?

I have a max word of 400 and this is GCSE geography (aqa)

thank you!
Ok, I think you’ve used evidence really well. Lots of good references to back up your statements.
Be careful with clarity, the opening statement I find is a little confusing. I get what you’re saying about how development leads to further impact on people but it doesn’t necessarily increase the danger of the disaster happening itself.
After every paragraph link it back to the topic of questions so it’s clear and easy for you to stay on topic.

I think context is really good. Be careful with how you put it all together. Follow PEEL for each paragraph. Point Example Explain Linkback.

The essay structure should include:
-Intro
-for paragraph
-against paragraph
-conclusion
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mohona1827
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i'm not sure how i would link back to the question
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MBa16.
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(Original post by mohona1827)
i'm not sure how i would link back to the question
Okay so linking back to the question is basically like a mini conclusion. Look back at the paragraph you’ve written and conclude what the dominant view is based on the question.
For example here’s a mini conclusion:
For instance, in Densly populated areas the risk of impact from natrual disasters is more significant, as mentioned above, because more people have settlement in a compact radius therefore more people will be affected.
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