Combined Pill effectiveness

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#1
I started the pill in January but took a month off during April. I just got a new prescription today. I was wondering when the pill would be considered effective. I got my period on Sunday so I started the pill on day 3/4 of my period. I've read differing advice saying it is immediately effective and others saying to wait 7 days.

Any advice would be great!
0
reply
Appirition
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 months ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
I started the pill in January but took a month off during April. I just got a new prescription today. I was wondering when the pill would be considered effective. I got my period on Sunday so I started the pill on day 3/4 of my period. I've read differing advice saying it is immediately effective and others saying to wait 7 days.

Any advice would be great!
If you start combination pills within 5 days after the first day of your period, you’ll be protected from pregnancy right away. For example, if you get your period Sunday morning, you can start the pill anytime until Friday morning and be protected from pregnancy that same day unless you have a short menstrual cycle (your period is every 23 days or less). If you have a short menstrual cycle, you will need additional contraception, such as condoms, until you have taken the pill for 7 days.
If you start combination pills any other time during your menstrual cycle, you need to take the pill for 7 days before you’ll be protected from pregnancy.

It's also worth remembering that the main thing that makes the pill not work is not taking it every day. But other things, like vomiting or having diarrhoea for more than 48 hours (2 days) may lower how well the pill prevents pregnancy. The pill may not work quite as well for people who are overweight.

These medicines or supplements can also make the pill not work as well:
• The antibiotic Rifampin (other antibiotics don’t make the pill less effective)
• The antifungal Griseofulvin (other antifungals don’t make the pill less effective)
• Certain HIV medicines
• Certain anti-seizure medicines (these are sometimes also used to treat psychiatric disorders like bipolar disorder)
• The herb St. John’s Wort
If you take any of these while you’re on the pill, use condoms as a backup method. Switch to a different method of birth control if you’ll be on them for a long time.

Your GP can help you decide if there’s any reason the birth control pill won’t work well for you.

I've taken extracts mostly from
https://www.plannedparenthood.org/le...h-control-pill
and added a bit from
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contra...aceptive-pill/
however, the information is similarly stated on numerous other sites.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#3
(Original post by Appirition)
If you start combination pills within 5 days after the first day of your period, you’ll be protected from pregnancy right away. For example, if you get your period Sunday morning, you can start the pill anytime until Friday morning and be protected from pregnancy that same day unless you have a short menstrual cycle (your period is every 23 days or less). If you have a short menstrual cycle, you will need additional contraception, such as condoms, until you have taken the pill for 7 days.
If you start combination pills any other time during your menstrual cycle, you need to take the pill for 7 days before you’ll be protected from pregnancy.

It's also worth remembering that the main thing that makes the pill not work is not taking it every day. But other things, like vomiting or having diarrhoea for more than 48 hours (2 days) may lower how well the pill prevents pregnancy. The pill may not work quite as well for people who are overweight.

These medicines or supplements can also make the pill not work as well:
• The antibiotic Rifampin (other antibiotics don’t make the pill less effective)
• The antifungal Griseofulvin (other antifungals don’t make the pill less effective)
• Certain HIV medicines
• Certain anti-seizure medicines (these are sometimes also used to treat psychiatric disorders like bipolar disorder)
• The herb St. John’s Wort
If you take any of these while you’re on the pill, use condoms as a backup method. Switch to a different method of birth control if you’ll be on them for a long time.

Your GP can help you decide if there’s any reason the birth control pill won’t work well for you.

I've taken extracts mostly from
https://www.plannedparenthood.org/le...h-control-pill
and added a bit from
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contra...aceptive-pill/
however, the information is similarly stated on numerous other sites.
So at the beginning of April I had a break through bleed that ended on the 3rd. Then I stopped taking the pill during April and my period came on Sunday (26th). Thats 23 days but my last bleed wasn't a period so does that make a difference?
0
reply
Appirition
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 months ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
So at the beginning of April I had a break through bleed that ended on the 3rd. Then I stopped taking the pill during April and my period came on Sunday (26th). Thats 23 days but my last bleed wasn't a period so does that make a difference?
I dont't think so. I think it's just the start of your period that's relevant, but I'm not a medical professional. The info I gave was just what I found by reading verious webpages.
If you need to be really sure, either use a condom or seek guidance from whoever prescribes your pills, or do both.
0
reply
LittleABC
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 11 months ago
#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
I started the pill in January but took a month off during April. I just got a new prescription today. I was wondering when the pill would be considered effective. I got my period on Sunday so I started the pill on day 3/4 of my period. I've read differing advice saying it is immediately effective and others saying to wait 7 days.

Any advice would be great!
I'm a professional. If in doubt, use condoms for 7 days after starting the packet. Easier than worrying about it. Bleeds on combined methods are not periods as such, but withdrawal bleeds from the hormone so you may notice a difference between these bleeds and your periods when you're not using a method.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now?

Anxiousness about lockdown easing (100)
5.12%
Uncertainty around my education (292)
14.95%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (206)
10.55%
Lack of purpose or motivation (273)
13.98%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (85)
4.35%
Impact of lockdown on physical health (111)
5.68%
Loneliness (170)
8.7%
Financial worries (70)
3.58%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (86)
4.4%
Exposure to negative news/social media (92)
4.71%
Lack of real life entertainment (108)
5.53%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (173)
8.86%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (187)
9.58%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise