Strengths of dypraxisia

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anon5252
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I was diagnosed late with dyspraxia at the age of 18. I had a feeling during my childhood that I struggled with a disorder, but I did not realise what the disorder was. I am good at spelling and reading. I used to engage in public speaking a lot in Primary School and during my A levels. However, I struggled with Maths GCSE exams. In English, I had excellent ideas, but I used to struggle with organising my writing logically. I feel that dyspraxia has a lot of negative connotations and it can cause me to have anxiety or doubt my capabilities. I wish that there was more awareness of dyspraxia as there is for ADHD and dyslexia. Currently, I struggle with short-term memory problems and organising my thoughts logically in essays at University. I am a law undergraduate student studying at a Russel group university. I have some strengths for example, an excellent long - term memory, good set of skills, good problem -solver, good at creating strategies in place, determined, hardworking, good at communicating with others and work under pressure whistl dealing with dyspraxia and issues in my personal life. Does anyone have any dyspraxia success stories or recognise their own strengths of dyspraxia? I listed my strengths so that someone who is recently diagnosed would be able to see the strengths that I feel that I have. I feel that it would be great to see other people coping well with dyspraxia as the information on the internet can be quite negative. Not everyone struggles with the disorder as intensely as websites like dyspraxia foundation claim. Don't get me wrong though, there are some days where it is really tiring when my brain is always thinking at 100mph and I struggle with anxiety with dyspraxia.

Sorry for the post, I just feel annoyed about the lack of awareness of the strengths of dyspraxia.
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CharlotteSCT
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(Original post by anon5252)
I was diagnosed late with dyspraxia at the age of 18. I had a feeling during my childhood that I struggled with a disorder, but I did not realise what the disorder was. I have always had good spelling and been a good reader. I used to engage in problem speaking a lot in Primary School and during my A levels. However, I struggled with Maths GCSE exams. In English, I had excellent ideas, but I used to struggle with organising my writing logically. I feel that dyspraxia has a lot of negative connotations and it can cause me to have anxiety or doubt my capabilities. I wish that there was more awareness of dyspraxia as there is for ADHD and dyslexia. Currently, I struggle with short-term memory problems and organising my thoughts logically in essays at University. I am a law undergraduate student studying at a Russel group university. I have some strengths for example, an excellent long - term memory, good set of skills, good problem -solver, good at creating strategies in place, determined, hardworking, good at communicating with others and work under pressure whistl dealing with dyspraxia and issues in my personal life. Does anyone have any dyspraxia success stories or recognise their own strengths of dyspraxia? I listed my strengths so that someone who is recently diagnosed would be able to see the strengths that I feel that I have. I feel that it would be great to see other people coping well with dyspraxia as the information on the internet can be quite negative. Not everyone struggles with the disorder as intensely as websites like dyspraxia foundation claim. Don't get me wrong though, there are some days where it is really tiring when my brain is always thinking at 100mph and I struggle with anxiety with dyspraxia.

Sorry for the post, I just feel annoyed about the lack of awareness of the strengths of dyspraxia.
Wow. You have so many strengths and will find a rewarding career I am sure. I don’t know much but if you like sport then Ellis Genge, the England. Leicester prop also known as the baby rhino, seems a good role model!! Good luck with your course and have a good life.
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anon5252
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(Original post by CharlotteSCT)
Wow. You have so many strengths and will find a rewarding career I am sure. I don’t know much but if you like sport then Ellis Genge, the England. Leicester prop also known as the baby rhino, seems a good role model!! Good luck with your course and have a good life.
Thank you so much for that, I appreciate it. Hope you have a good life too.
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CharlotteSCT
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(Original post by anon5252)
Thank you so much for that, I appreciate it. Hope you have a good life too.
You are so right. It is sort of a "hidden" issue- people think you are clumsy or disorganised or a not clever and not enough people know about it at all. Have you had help from occupational therapy? I think there is help out there for Short term memory issues and lots of programs to help you organise your writing. Once things are in short term memory it isn't a problem for you so finding a non tiring way of doing that would give you more intellectual and emotional energy. Once you leave Uni you may know most of what you need to know OR only need to learn smaller amounts at a time maybe? Best wishes C
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anon5252
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(Original post by CharlotteSCT)
You are so right. It is sort of a "hidden" issue- people think you are clumsy or disorganised or a not clever and not enough people know about it at all. Have you had help from occupational therapy? I think there is help out there for Short term memory issues and lots of programs to help you organise your writing. Once things are in short term memory it isn't a problem for you so finding a non tiring way of doing that would give you more intellectual and emotional energy. Once you leave Uni you may know most of what you need to know OR only need to learn smaller amounts at a time maybe? Best wishes C
Yes it is and one of my main goals is to create a lot more awareness of dyspraxia and acknowledge the strengths of dyspraxia. I remember searching about it on the internet and I noticed a lot more negative connotations rather than strengths, so I hope someone sees this post and can maybe resonate with some of the strengths I listed above.
I was extremely anxious before going to university because a few teachers teachers in my college were being mean to me after I told them about the diagnosis. These are the same teachers who recognised my academic ability and used to see me as a high achiever, but they ended up being mean to me and offering no support. My tutor teacher refused to check my personal statement.I was predicted to obtain AAB in my second year of A levels and my tutor teacher said "Are you sure you can get that?" Some people in my class noticed that he was acting differently towards me and pointed it out to me. But I did not say anything. I had to deal with learning coping strategies by myself. I have not received any additional help, in fact the specialist support teacher for those with "special needs" at my college was quite mean to me too and changed. My assessor (who was dyspraxic) advised me against going into law because I have dyspraxia. I ended up having so many misconceptions about myself in my second year and suffered from depression and severe anxiety as a result of this.
Thank you for your advice, I appreciate it.
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CharlotteSCT
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(Original post by anon5252)
Yes it is and one of my main goals is to create a lot more awareness of dyspraxia and acknowledge the strengths of dyspraxia. I remember searching about it on the internet and I noticed a lot more negative connotations rather than strengths, so I hope someone sees this post and can maybe resonate with some of the strengths I listed above.
I was extremely anxious before going to university because a few teachers teachers in my college were being mean to me after I told them about the diagnosis. These are the same teachers who recognised my academic ability and used to see me as a high achiever, but they ended up being mean to me and offering no support. My tutor teacher refused to check my personal statement.I was predicted to obtain AAB in my second year of A levels and my tutor teacher said "Are you sure you can get that?" Some people in my class noticed that he was acting differently towards me and pointed it out to me. But I did not say anything. I had to deal with learning coping strategies by myself. I have not received any additional help, in fact the specialist support teacher for those with "special needs" at my college was quite mean to me too and changed. My assessor (who was dyspraxic) advised me against going into law because I have dyspraxia. I ended up having so many misconceptions about myself in my second year and suffered from depression and severe anxiety as a result of this.
Thank you for your advice, I appreciate it.
Wow that is all so negative! To get to where you are, without a diagnosis or support shows how able you are! Stay strong, value your brilliant abilities and remember the academic world is made for people with a narrow subset of skills and you obviously have others that they won't have which will be more useful when you are working or whatever you want to do! I think people with dyspraxia have poor working memories rather than truly poor short term memories - so the short term memories don't get in the information into them to remember, and that can definitely be helped quite easily! It is similar in dyslexia which I do know about! I found this in an online search if it is any help? https://www.geniuswithin.co.uk/blog/...-going-to-say/
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anon5252
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(Original post by CharlotteSCT)
Wow that is all so negative! To get to where you are, without a diagnosis or support shows how able you are! Stay strong, value your brilliant abilities and remember the academic world is made for people with a narrow subset of skills and you obviously have others that they won't have which will be more useful when you are working or whatever you want to do! I think people with dyspraxia have poor working memories rather than truly poor short term memories - so the short term memories don't get in the information into them to remember, and that can definitely be helped quite easily! It is similar in dyslexia which I do know about! I found this in an online search if it is any help? https://www.geniuswithin.co.uk/blog/...-going-to-say/
Thank you so much for your kind words, I really appreciate it. I will also check out the blog too.
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