HollyAJb
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Hi, I am doing my EPQ on zoonotic diseases.
I am thinking about basing it on cat scratch disease, the bovine tuberculosis outbreak, the avian influenza outbreak and on One Health.
I was thinking about the question being:
'How can One Health reduce the spread of zoonotic diseases, and how could they have helped in past outbreaks'
However, I am not sure if this would be an engaging enough question, even though I am quite interested in this topic.
I have been trying to find help on google on this type of EPQ for better question ideas, however, as it turns out there are not many places that can give aid on an EPQ on zoonotic diseases.
Could you please give me some good ideas for questions and perhaps some more engaging topics that I could build up to have an A* EPQ
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turkeydinosaur16
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(Original post by HollyAJb)
Hi, I am doing my EPQ on zoonotic diseases.
I am thinking about basing it on cat scratch disease, the bovine tuberculosis outbreak, the avian influenza outbreak and on One Health.
I was thinking about the question being:
'How can One Health reduce the spread of zoonotic diseases, and how could they have helped in past outbreaks'
However, I am not sure if this would be an engaging enough question, even though I am quite interested in this topic.
I have been trying to find help on google on this type of EPQ for better question ideas, however, as it turns out there are not many places that can give aid on an EPQ on zoonotic diseases.
Could you please give me some good ideas for questions and perhaps some more engaging topics that I could build up to have an A* EPQ
If you're looking for further topics in this area, have a look at mad cow disease and scrapie in sheep. The jump from sheep to cow is perhaps more interesting than cow to human but it is a good example of a rather significant zoonotic disease.
Hope this helps
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trust.the.dirt
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(Original post by HollyAJb)
Hi, I am doing my EPQ on zoonotic diseases.
I am thinking about basing it on cat scratch disease, the bovine tuberculosis outbreak, the avian influenza outbreak and on One Health.
I was thinking about the question being:
'How can One Health reduce the spread of zoonotic diseases, and how could they have helped in past outbreaks'
However, I am not sure if this would be an engaging enough question, even though I am quite interested in this topic.
I have been trying to find help on google on this type of EPQ for better question ideas, however, as it turns out there are not many places that can give aid on an EPQ on zoonotic diseases.
Could you please give me some good ideas for questions and perhaps some more engaging topics that I could build up to have an A* EPQ
One health sounds interesting, but I think you'd have to dive in talking about the social and political aspects of it, which I think (especially a science teacher) an assessor might confuse with less detailed biology content, although maybe not.

I think the most interesting Zoonotic disease class is prion disease. It causes vCJD which had it's epicentre in England, and was a big scare for the country, affecting blood banks, farms, operating room sterilisation etc... Its basically a pathogen entirely separate from viruses, parasites, bacteria and amoeba. It's just a single misfolded protein which can induce proteins with the same primary structure in our brains to misfold, causing buildup of plaques which causes some really scary symptoms including dementia, psychosis and in one prion type, (Fatal familial insomnia) severe insomnia to the point where the patient essentially dies from lack of sleep. You could ask "What would the impact of a prion epidemic be on the population". You could also look at Kuru which was cause by (I think) cannibalistic practices within tribes.

Another thing about EPQ that I never really got is that you're not actually required to ask a question in your title. In fact, many academic articles (papers particularly) do not ask a question in the title because it's a little over simplifying of the purpose of the article. Most good pieces of writing are much more complex than - here's a question, lets look at some points about it, here's some other people's opinions, now here's my opinion and why it's right.

I dropped out of it, but I wrote a foreword which explained that I was not going to ask a question, because I wanted to explore various aspects of a subject and use it to inform and build a picture of it for the reader, whilst still exhibiting criticism and evaluation skills, by arguing my viewpoint and opinions within different sections of the article. This makes you much more free to develop your project as you discover new ideas when developing it. You do need to be careful to still be explicit about what you are trying to achieve in the article. To give an example, mine was Sexual health knowledge in KS4 students and the quality of sexual education in Leicester. I think to change this to a question would just make it sound less mature, but it's still obvious that I'm asking if KS4 students in Leicester have a good understanding of sexual health, and gives me the oportunity to explore surrounding topics in a way that's still justified in the title.

Also, one super helpful thing that no-one told us, is that microsoft word has a really easy references option which makes your bibliography for you, and updates it and your citations as you go along. You can also choose any style you want, Havard, APA etc...

Sorry for the long post, really ***ng bored
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HollyAJb
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(Original post by trust.the.dirt)
One health sounds interesting, but I think you'd have to dive in talking about the social and political aspects of it, which I think (especially a science teacher) an assessor might confuse with less detailed biology content, although maybe not.

I think the most interesting Zoonotic disease class is prion disease. It causes vCJD which had it's epicentre in England, and was a big scare for the country, affecting blood banks, farms, operating room sterilisation etc... Its basically a pathogen entirely separate from viruses, parasites, bacteria and amoeba. It's just a single misfolded protein which can induce proteins with the same primary structure in our brains to misfold, causing buildup of plaques which causes some really scary symptoms including dementia, psychosis and in one prion type, (Fatal familial insomnia) severe insomnia to the point where the patient essentially dies from lack of sleep. You could ask "What would the impact of a prion epidemic be on the population". You could also look at Kuru which was cause by (I think) cannibalistic practices within tribes.

Another thing about EPQ that I never really got is that you're not actually required to ask a question in your title. In fact, many academic articles (papers particularly) do not ask a question in the title because it's a little over simplifying of the purpose of the article. Most good pieces of writing are much more complex than - here's a question, lets look at some points about it, here's some other people's opinions, now here's my opinion and why it's right.

I dropped out of it, but I wrote a foreword which explained that I was not going to ask a question, because I wanted to explore various aspects of a subject and use it to inform and build a picture of it for the reader, whilst still exhibiting criticism and evaluation skills, by arguing my viewpoint and opinions within different sections of the article. This makes you much more free to develop your project as you discover new ideas when developing it. You do need to be careful to still be explicit about what you are trying to achieve in the article. To give an example, mine was Sexual health knowledge in KS4 students and the quality of sexual education in Leicester. I think to change this to a question would just make it sound less mature, but it's still obvious that I'm asking if KS4 students in Leicester have a good understanding of sexual health, and gives me the oportunity to explore surrounding topics in a way that's still justified in the title.

Also, one super helpful thing that no-one told us, is that microsoft word has a really easy references option which makes your bibliography for you, and updates it and your citations as you go along. You can also choose any style you want, Havard, APA etc...

Sorry for the long post, really ***ng bored
Thank you so much. I am definitely going to take these into account.
I didn't know that we don't actually need a question as a title, so I am definitely going to come up with a title now, otherwise by having a question it shrink the range of things that I can talk about down.
And thank you for the word pointer, didn't know that that option was there, I wanted to write mine more like an academic article as well, which this would be amazing for.
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Bookworm_88
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Perhaps, something related to COVID-19, however others might hitch onto the COVID-19 Bandwagon
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