British nationality HELP!!!!

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Anonymous #1
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So I was born in the UK and have lived here all my life. My dad has British citizenship but my mum didn't and they weren't married (I was born in 1998). As I'm now coming up to graduation I was looking at jobs in the FCO, Ministry of Defence, etc and I've realised I don't qualify unless I buy British citizenship at the cost of over £1k. Can anyone help with what this entails and whether I'd actually be accepted to work for the British government? Thanks (anonymous because this is private for me)
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Anonymous #1
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Please answer if you can help
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Anonymous #2
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I thought the UK has birthright citizenship like in the US? If your father is a British citizen/is considered "Settled" in the UK (aka permanent residency) and you were born in the UK, you qualify for birthright citizenship. The only time it would be contested is if either of your parents is a foreign diplomat.

This happened to my cousin, as she was born in the US but her mother was a diplomat, and the home country could claim my cousin as their citizen (in the case of diplomats).
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mnot
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I believe some people need to apply & others just need to register for citizenship (check if you can do this).

I would have thought you were entitled to citizenship but you'll need to check and if so just register.

Would have thought your parents would have registered your nationality at birth.

EDIT: whether you need to apply or register may well depend on if you are a citizen of another country
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I thought the UK has birthright citizenship like in the US? If your father is a British citizen/is considered "Settled" in the UK (aka permanent residency) and you were born in the UK, you qualify for birthright citizenship. The only time it would be contested is if either of your parents is a foreign diplomat.

This happened to my cousin, as she was born in the US but her mother was a diplomat, and the home country could claim my cousin as their citizen (in the case of diplomats).
Unfortunately, the UK doesn't have birthright citizenship as stated on the Home Office website. It's very draconian and something I find extremely degrading. https://www.gov.uk/british-citizenship
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by mnot)
I believe some people need to apply & others just need to register for citizenship (check if you can do this).

I would have thought you were entitled to citizenship but you'll need to check and if so just register.

Would have thought your parents would have registered your nationality at birth.

EDIT: whether you need to apply or register may well depend on if you are a citizen of another country
I have to apply for nationality as my parents weren't married. I have nationality of an EU country but there was no option for me to get British nationality when I was born as it simply isn't a birthright
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I have to apply for nationality as my parents weren't married. I have nationality of an EU country but there was no option for me to get British nationality when I was born as it simply isn't a birthright
Well it sounds like you know the situation better then what I can say, good luck.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I have to apply for nationality as my parents weren't married. I have nationality of an EU country but there was no option for me to get British nationality when I was born as it simply isn't a birthright
According to this and the Immigration Act of 2014, provisions were inserted to the British Nationality Act 1981 to provide those a right to register as a British citizen to people who either would have been born British or would have been entitled to register as British had their British father been married to their mother at the time of their birth. According to these, there is no fee for someone to register as British under sections 4E to 4J – save that someone who is an adult at the time of the decision to register them will have to pay the ceremony fee (currently £80).

Could you tell us why you have to pay to £1k+ and whether the 2014 provisions apply to you?
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Napp
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Why would you need to buy it? If you father is a subject and you were born here you should automatically be one?
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Napp)
Why would you need to buy it? If you father is a subject and you were born here you should automatically be one?
Unfortunately, the British Nationality Act of 1981 limited jus solis (birthright citizenship) until 2006 when new legislation was introduced and provisions made in 2014.

To my understanding, citizenship was not granted if the child, even though they were born on British soil, was born out of wedlock.
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Napp)
Why would you need to buy it? If you father is a subject and you were born here you should automatically be one?
My parents are both subjects but they got the citizenship after I was born. The law state that you need to have it and then pass it on to the child.
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ThiagoBrigido
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(Original post by Anonymous)
My parents are both subjects but they got the citizenship after I was born. The law state that you need to have it and then pass it on to the child.
It is appalling! They always find a way to screw people up. That is the Great Britain for you...
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
According to this and the Immigration Act of 2014, provisions were inserted to the British Nationality Act 1981 to provide those a right to register as a British citizen to people who either would have been born British or would have been entitled to register as British had their British father been married to their mother at the time of their birth. According to these, there is no fee for someone to register as British under sections 4E to 4J – save that someone who is an adult at the time of the decision to register them will have to pay the ceremony fee (currently £80).

Could you tell us why you have to pay to £1k+ and whether the 2014 provisions apply to you?
Wow I literally never knew about this and I’ve called up the home office three times asking if I’m eligible for British citizenship and explained my circumstances clearly. Because of my country’s laws in dual citizenship (Germany) I’m going to have to apply before the brexit transition period ends as they passed a law in the Bundestag that allows dual citizenship for German and British nationals if they apply before the transition ends - Germany only allows dual citizenship with other EU states
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Napp)
Why would you need to buy it? If you father is a subject and you were born here you should automatically be one?
I was born out of wedlock before 2006 and my mum is not British so I did not automatically get it - I’ve replied to the anon 2’s post but it’s being moderated
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Wow I literally never knew about this and I’ve called up the home office three times asking if I’m eligible for British citizenship and explained my circumstances clearly. Because of my country’s laws in dual citizenship (Germany) I’m going to have to apply before the brexit transition period ends as they passed a law in the Bundestag that allows dual citizenship for German and British nationals if they apply before the transition ends - Germany only allows dual citizenship with other EU states
Ahh I see. Did you get your German citizenship from your mother?

I suggest you try calling the Home Office again and cite the Immigration Act of 2014, tell them your circumstance falls under 4E (child born out of wedlock but on UK soil) and see what they say.
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honeybuns2k5
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Unfortunately, the UK doesn't have birthright citizenship as stated on the Home Office website. It's very draconian and something I find extremely degrading. https://www.gov.uk/british-citizenship
omg are you kidding? my father is British and mother is Kuwaiti, they were married? am I British or not? I'm terrified now??wtf
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by honeybuns2k5)
omg are you kidding? my father is British and mother is Kuwaiti, they were married? am I British or not? I'm terrified now??wtf
do you have a british passport? because if you do, then you're fine as british passports are only issued to british citizens (both jus soli and naturalized
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honeybuns2k5
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(Original post by Anonymous)
do you have a british passport? because if you do, then you're fine as british passports are only issued to british citizens (both jus soli and naturalized
I do ah ok tysm lmao thank god
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Orange s0da
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Before you can apply you will need to have passed the life in the uk test. Despite being born in the UK unless you have an extensive knowledge of british history it will take some revision. Second you need to prove proficiency in the english language. This can either be in the form of a degree certificate or you can sit and pass one of the accredited English tests. Then you need to complete the application form. Make sure you are a person of "Good Character" (read up on the requierements). Then you need to book an appointment to submit your finger prints. Once approved you need to attend a citizenship ceremony. After that, you can apply for your passport. If you're lucky the whole process can take 2 months. If not you could be waiting for years. The following forum can answer any further questions you may have https://www.immigrationboards.com/british-citizenship/

Good Luck
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