GDL vs Accelerated Graduate Entry LLB

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fb24
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#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hi everybody,

My background:
I have a B.Tech undergrad degree in IT & I have 4 years of work experience as a Software Engineer at Amazon, India.

I want to pursue a career in Law and I chose UK as it has more flexibility in the courses offered in Law unlike in my home country.

I hold offers for a 2 year accelerated Graduate Entry LLB with the following universities :
Uni of Edinburgh (Scots Law)
Uni of Leeds (English/NL Law)
Uni of York(English/NL Law)
Uni of Dundee(English/NL Law)
Uni of Aberdeen (English/NL Law)

Given the current covid situation and the job market scenarios,
- would it be wise to pursue an academic degree in Law ?
- is the GDL a good alternative to consider?
- Scots Law vs English Law ? (only reason im even considering Scots Law is because it's the uni of Edinbugh! )

Also, please share any insights on the university choices!

Many thanks in advance guys!
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harrysbar
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#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by fb24)
Hi everybody,

My background:
I have a B.Tech undergrad degree in IT & I have 4 years of work experience as a Software Engineer at Amazon, India.

I want to pursue a career in Law and I chose UK as it has more flexibility in the courses offered in Law unlike in my home country.

I hold offers for a 2 year accelerated Graduate Entry LLB with the following universities :
Uni of Edinburgh (Scots Law)
Uni of Leeds (English/NL Law)
Uni of York(English/NL Law)
Uni of Dundee(English/NL Law)
Uni of Aberdeen (English/NL Law)

Given the current covid situation and the job market scenarios,
- would it be wise to pursue an academic degree in Law ?
- is the GDL a good alternative to consider?
- Scots Law vs English Law ? (only reason im even considering Scots Law is because it's the uni of Edinbugh! )

Also, please share any insights on the university choices!

Many thanks in advance guys!
If you want to work as a solicitor in England, the fastest route to doing so is currently the GDL. There is no need to do an LLB unless you really want to because you have an interest in academic law (the GDL is more of a crammer course as it distils the main elements of a 3 year law degree into 1 year)
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The University of Law Students
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#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by fb24)
Hi everybody,

My background:
I have a B.Tech undergrad degree in IT & I have 4 years of work experience as a Software Engineer at Amazon, India.

I want to pursue a career in Law and I chose UK as it has more flexibility in the courses offered in Law unlike in my home country.

I hold offers for a 2 year accelerated Graduate Entry LLB with the following universities :
Uni of Edinburgh (Scots Law)
Uni of Leeds (English/NL Law)
Uni of York(English/NL Law)
Uni of Dundee(English/NL Law)
Uni of Aberdeen (English/NL Law)

Given the current covid situation and the job market scenarios,
- would it be wise to pursue an academic degree in Law ?
- is the GDL a good alternative to consider?
- Scots Law vs English Law ? (only reason im even considering Scots Law is because it's the uni of Edinbugh! )

Also, please share any insights on the university choices!

Many thanks in advance guys!
Hi,

I think your choice probably depends on what you want to get out of your degree! The GDL is a more intensive course, but that also means it is more time effective. You get one step closer to professional qualification over the course of one year (full time), rather than over two years. I completed the GDL last year at ULaw and I would say it is the preferred route for those applying for training contracts who are eager to start work as soon as possible. Law firms won't expect you to have an LLB when applying to them - I personally had no trouble applying for training contracts without an LLB (my undergraduate degree is in English and French).

You don't get quite the same depth on the GDL as on an LLB, as mentioned above the GDL teaches you the essential elements that you will need going forward to study either the LPC or BPTC.

If you have an academic interest in the law, and are possibly considering even further study (eg LLM) then the LLB would probably be the wiser choice.

Hope this helps!

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds Campus)
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fb24
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#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by The University of Law Students)
Hi,

I think your choice probably depends on what you want to get out of your degree! The GDL is a more intensive course, but that also means it is more time effective. You get one step closer to professional qualification over the course of one year (full time), rather than over two years. I completed the GDL last year at ULaw and I would say it is the preferred route for those applying for training contracts who are eager to start work as soon as possible. Law firms won't expect you to have an LLB when applying to them - I personally had no trouble applying for training contracts without an LLB (my undergraduate degree is in English and French).

You don't get quite the same depth on the GDL as on an LLB, as mentioned above the GDL teaches you the essential elements that you will need going forward to study either the LPC or BPTC.

If you have an academic interest in the law, and are possibly considering even further study (eg LLM) then the LLB would probably be the wiser choice.

Hope this helps!

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds Campus)
Thanks for these insights, this was very helpful.

I have a few more questions :
- Since GDL allows rolling admissions, when would be the appropriate time to apply ?
- There would be good competition from the LLB graduates too right?
- Does GDL affect employability?
- When do you start applying for Training Contracts if you choose the GDL path?
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The University of Law Students
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#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by fb24)
Thanks for these insights, this was very helpful.

I have a few more questions :
- Since GDL allows rolling admissions, when would be the appropriate time to apply ?
- There would be good competition from the LLB graduates too right?
- Does GDL affect employability?
- When do you start applying for Training Contracts if you choose the GDL path?
Glad you found it helpful!

In response to your first question, I think the best time to apply for the GDL is as soon as possible if you're sure you want to do it. You will be able to apply now for courses starting in September 2020. I actually only applied for the GDL in August before starting the following September.

I'm unsure what you mean about competition from LLB graduates, do you mean competition for those applying for TCs who are studying the GDL? To be honest, job applications are competitive in any event, amongst those still completing their undergraduate studies, those studying GDL or other qualifying law degrees. The GDL is accepted by law firms as a traditional route into a career in law, so I don't think you should worry about having to compete based on whichever law degree you choose. Many firms will pay for your GDL (and later LPC) fees if you secure a training contract with them before starting the course.

In response to your third question, as mentioned above the GDL is a traditional and accepted route into law. It used to be the case that more lawyers came from law rather than non-law backgrounds however it is now about 50/50. So the GDL won't negatively impact on your employability at all. Your employability depends on academics as well as experience, so one really important thing to be thinking about if you're going to be applying for training contracts is your work experience to date, both legal and non-legal.

As for your final question, seeing as you are a graduate you can apply for training contracts anytime from now. Each firm will have on its website the deadlines for its vacation scheme and training contract applications. A lot of firms have winter deadlines so you could start working on your applications now, with a mind to applying from September. You don't have to have a GDL to start applying, as most firms hire 2 years in advance which gives you time to complete your conversion and professional qualification into law.

Let me know if you need any of this clarifying further!

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds Campus)
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Cristiano22
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#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by The University of Law Students)
Glad you found it helpful!

In response to your first question, I think the best time to apply for the GDL is as soon as possible if you're sure you want to do it. You will be able to apply now for courses starting in September 2020. I actually only applied for the GDL in August before starting the following September.

I'm unsure what you mean about competition from LLB graduates, do you mean competition for those applying for TCs who are studying the GDL? To be honest, job applications are competitive in any event, amongst those still completing their undergraduate studies, those studying GDL or other qualifying law degrees. The GDL is accepted by law firms as a traditional route into a career in law, so I don't think you should worry about having to compete based on whichever law degree you choose. Many firms will pay for your GDL (and later LPC) fees if you secure a training contract with them before starting the course.

In response to your third question, as mentioned above the GDL is a traditional and accepted route into law. It used to be the case that more lawyers came from law rather than non-law backgrounds however it is now about 50/50. So the GDL won't negatively impact on your employability at all. Your employability depends on academics as well as experience, so one really important thing to be thinking about if you're going to be applying for training contracts is your work experience to date, both legal and non-legal.

As for your final question, seeing as you are a graduate you can apply for training contracts anytime from now. Each firm will have on its website the deadlines for its vacation scheme and training contract applications. A lot of firms have winter deadlines so you could start working on your applications now, with a mind to applying from September. You don't have to have a GDL to start applying, as most firms hire 2 years in advance which gives you time to complete your conversion and professional qualification into law.

Let me know if you need any of this clarifying further!

Jess
Student Ambassador at ULaw (Leeds Campus)
Hello. Sorry to interfere with your topic.
I have a similar question.
I received an offer from The Uni of Law - GDL, MA Law (SQE1) and MA Law (conversion). I also have offers from other universities for Accelerated LLBs.
To be honest, I am looking for the fastest way to become a solicitor in England. I am a foreign lawyer, I have a law degree, but I am not familiar with common law. I need a course that will quickly teach me English law and prepare me for the SQE.
I would like to choose GDL as it is fast. But I'm not sure if this course will prepare me for SQE.
What would you recommend to choose?
Thank you.
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The University of Law Students
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#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Cristiano22)
Hello. Sorry to interfere with your topic.
I have a similar question.
I received an offer from The Uni of Law - GDL, MA Law (SQE1) and MA Law (conversion). I also have offers from other universities for Accelerated LLBs.
To be honest, I am looking for the fastest way to become a solicitor in England. I am a foreign lawyer, I have a law degree, but I am not familiar with common law. I need a course that will quickly teach me English law and prepare me for the SQE.
I would like to choose GDL as it is fast. But I'm not sure if this course will prepare me for SQE.
What would you recommend to choose?
Thank you.
Hi Cristiano22

Here is a link that explains the different routes. Please see the text for the key dates about the different routes. There are several options open to you. Have a look and if it doesn't answer your questions, feel free to message us (or reply here): https://www.law.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/sqe/

Hope that helps.
Nic
Student Ambassador
University of Law
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17Student17
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#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
I think this a one year course for SQE1 and 2 https://www.law.ac.uk/study/postgrad...m-sqe-1-and-2/
It says "Attendance requirements•The course isdeliveredover a period of 42 weeksincluding two revision booster courses." https://www.law.ac.uk/globalassets/1...ce-sqe-1-2.pdf
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