Preparing for university study, tips?

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chloemh97
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So i have been accepted into university for September 2020 start, i have been out of education for nearly 5 years. I am starting with a foundation degree to start with in Health and Social Care so its not too overwhelming. Has anyone got any tips for me to prepare for the work load e.g. reading materials? or how to prepare for assignment writing.
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Firstly, congrats on getting accepted.

I have 5 years' experience studying in higher education - not something to be gloat about.

Having drafted a guide for my classmates thinking of going to uni, these would be my main pointers:
1) Learn touch typing - it takes 10 hours to learn and you can do this online
2) Read up academic writing. I recommend reading How to Write Great Essays by Peter Levin
3) Brush up on how to use Microsoft Word, and possibly Excel and PowerPoint. If you need me to point out a list of topics to look into, let me know.
4) Most of the study in your first year would not be as intensive as your second and third. The degrees tend to be designed in a way where it teaches you the ropes of the course before it starts challenging you. I recommend briefly read some of the material from the recommended text they have in your unit outlines. You don't need to buy the textbooks unless you feel you need to - when I did my degrees, I spent a lot of time in the university library to get use to the swing of things.
Unfortunately, I did not do Health and Social care at uni, so I don't know any books I can specifically recommend you in this regard.
5) There is a method to academic reading, and it doesn't involve you reading everything - you learn to pick up the necessary and relevant material from the passages you read.
6) Learn to read academic journals, as you will need to use them in your studies in your second and third year. I don't recommend reading anything random as you will need to have some foundational knowledge in the field before you can fully understand the material. If you go to specific chapters in the recommended text books, you will see references and recommended readings for the material they have covered. Read the chapter before looking at the journal articles.
Most journal articles would be available at the university library, but if you need to, use Google Scholar - do not pay for the articles.
Failing this, you can read up Wikipedia articles on topics you will be covering. Never quote Wikipedia or use it in your references. Most of the material on the Wikipedia pages will be well beyond what you need in your Bachelor's, but they offer key journal references you could read up.
7) Learn how to do academic referencing. In all likelihood, you will learn Harvard Referencing Style. Read up on this and look at how some of your textbooks have used the style. Learn to paraphase where possible.
8) Learn how to write critically in academia. This is key if you want the high marks. Typical issues you would come across would be addressing assumptions, how to improve on certain things, what are the drawbacks of certain theories.
9) Learn how to speed read. Your first year won't include a lot of reading material e.g. 30 pages per module per week. If you learn to read quickly, this will make life in Year 2 and 3 easier. There's a technique to reading quickly, and I can't recommend specific courses due to the community guidelines.

Let me know if you need any further pointers.
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UniofGreenwich
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(Original post by chloemh97)
So i have been accepted into university for September 2020 start, i have been out of education for nearly 5 years. I am starting with a foundation degree to start with in Health and Social Care so its not too overwhelming. Has anyone got any tips for me to prepare for the work load e.g. reading materials? or how to prepare for assignment writing.
Hi,
You've been given amazing suggestions already so I'll just add on from that. I study law so I’m just going to give general university tips.

The best way I’ve found to manage workload before it gets overwhelming is to stay on top of the work from the beginning. So it’s a good idea to go to every lecture and seminar and try and do all the work set.

Most times loads of tips that will help you with things like assignment structure will be given in seminars so make sure you fully engage with seminars.

I’ve also found that the best way to revise is to have a really good textbook that you actually enjoy reading somewhat. So I think it’s a good idea to try and have a look at all your recommended textbook options (in person if you can) before deciding on one.

I’m sure when you get into the swing of things at uni you’ll be fine because a lot of guidance is given when you first start.

Good luck!

Hope this helps

Devina
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