BSc vs. MSci Hons - What's the difference? Watch

This discussion is closed.
jhomie
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
I've been looking at various chemistry courses and some are BSc and some are MSci Hons

I found this on wikipedia:

Undergraduate Master's Courses

[edit] With Dissertation

In the UK, many universities now have four-year undergraduate programmes mainly in the sciences or in engineering with a research project or Dissertation in the final year. The awards for these are named after the subject, so a course in mathematics would earn a Master in Mathematics degree, (abbreviated to MMath), or have a general title such as MSci (Master in Science at most universities but Master of Natural Sciences at Cambridge), MBiomed, MBiochem, MChem, MComp, MPharm, MEng, MMath, MPhys, MML, MDes, etc.

In content the first two years they are generally identical to those of the equivalent Bachelor's degree while the third and fourth years are a combination of higher-level taught courses and a research project.

An example of an undergraduate master's degree in the professions in the United Kingdom is Pharmacy. In order to become a pharmacist, the undergraduate MPharm must be completed, followed by one year of pre-registration experience. A similar situation exists as regards Engineering.

[edit] Without Dissertation

The Master of Arts (MA) is awarded by the universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Trinity College, Dublin —without further examination— to those entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. This is a different program than those above.

The ancient universities of Scotland (St Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Edinburgh) and Dundee award a Master of Arts (MA) as their normal undergraduate degree after four years of study in Arts, Humanities or Social Sciences.



What i don't get is the benefits of this? Is it a shorter duration? Financially cheaper?

Also.. if you do a MSci do you have a bachelors and a masters degree? so when you apply for a job you say you have both or something?

[edit] Postgraduate Master's degrees

Postgraduate Master's degrees in the United Kingdom can either be taught degrees involving lectures, examination and a short dissertation, or research degrees (though the latter have largely been replaced by MPhil and MRes programmes, see below). Taught Master's programmes involve 1 or 2 years of full-time study. The programmes are often very intensive and demanding, and concentrate on one very specialised area of knowledge. Some universities also offer a Master's by Learning Contract scheme, where a candidate can specify his or her own learning objectives; these are submitted to supervising academics for approval, and are assessed by means of written reports, practical demonstrations and presentations.
0
EvilSheep
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 years ago
#2
I'm no expert, and definitely not on chemistry courses, but I'd assume that the Msci is an undergraduate masters.. Eg. you do 4 years as opposed to 3..
0
andy_1989
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 11 years ago
#3
That's what I thought.
0
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 years ago
#4
The MSci is an undergraduate masters, taken over four years, and may be important if you wish to follow a research career.
0
jhomie
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#5
What is an undergraduate masters and how does it differ from a bachelors?
0
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 years ago
#6
It is a taught masters degree, one level over a bachelors degree, and one below a doctorate.
0
Toxic Tears
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report 11 years ago
#7
(Original post by Good bloke)
It is a taught masters degree, one level over a bachelors degree, and one below a doctorate.
If you do a MSci in Biology, can you still do a separate Masters in a specialism of Biology?

And is it better to do a separate Masters or do an integrated Masters (i.e. MSci)?

These questions are for anyone...
0
jhomie
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#8
yea good point toxic. which is better... BSc or MSci

i still dont really get the difference between the two
0
blahbloo
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 11 years ago
#9
(Original post by EierVonSatan)
MSc > MSci/MChem > BSc
MSc is better than MSci? Thought they were more or less the same? :eek: Clarify, please!
0
Ewan
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 years ago
#10
If you go to Cambrige, doesnt your BA age into an MA after a year anyway LOL?
0
jhomie
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#11
i still dont get what the difference is between them. like why there is a BSc and MSci for the same course

which would be better?

With BSc you go for masters then doctorate, but
with an MSci do you then go for a masters or can you do a doctorate
0
blahbloo
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report 11 years ago
#12
(Original post by EierVonSatan)
Since you asked nicely :p: Firstly the MSci is an undergraduate degree and so is done on an undergraduate timetable, the MSc is postgraduate course that covers an entire years worth of work. The grade you get for the MSci is a combination of all 'bachelor' and 'masters' years so the grade doesn't reflect your achievement in your final ('masters') year quite as much as a MSc does.

I understand. :o: Thanks for your detailed explanation!
0
Ronnie01
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 11 years ago
#13
There is an extra year in an MSci, where you study your chosen subject in more depth, and recieve a more respected degree accordingly.

Thats the simplest way i can put it!
0
Vjyrik
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 11 years ago
#14
What would be the benefits of going for a 4-year MSci (Hons) degree instead of going for a 3-year BSc (Hons) degree followed by 1-year MSc?
0
Rhys.
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 11 years ago
#15
(Original post by Vjyrik)
What would be the benefits of going for a 4-year MSci (Hons) degree instead of going for a 3-year BSc (Hons) degree followed by 1-year MSc?
Financially. Because it's technically an undergraduate degree, you continue to receive your student loan for your fourth year, rather than having to fund it yourself.
0
jhomie
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#16
I might be a bit daft but MSci is a degree in between that of a bachelors and masters?

i still don't really understand the benefits of a MSci over BSc. Financial benefits? do you learn more? work more? etc etc
0
JohnnyHouse
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 11 years ago
#17
what? u cant get a MSc funded???
0
.ACS.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 11 years ago
#18
A BSc is a Bachelors degree. A MSci is an undergraduate Masters degree, meaning in a sense it's equivalent to a MSc (a postgraduate Masters degree) though you're guaranteed government funding.

Personally I would always opt for the MSci as you can change in your second year as to whether or not you want to continue with the MSci or transfer to the BSc.

Funding for a MSc (postgraduate Masters) is difficult to get and must be sought out through research councils (though your MSc must then be linked to a PhD, forcing you to do a PhD; or at least this is the case with the ESRC).
0
JohnnyHouse
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 11 years ago
#19
(Original post by .ACS.)
A BSc is a Bachelors degree. A MSci is an undergraduate Masters degree, meaning in a sense it's equivalent to a MSc (a postgraduate Masters degree) though you're guaranteed government funding.

Personally I would always opt for the MSci as you can change in your second year as to whether or not you want to continue with the MSci or transfer to the BSc.

Funding for a MSc (postgraduate Masters) is difficult to get and must be sought out through research councils (though your MSc must then be linked to a PhD, forcing you to do a PhD; or at least this is the case with the ESRC).
I would want to do a PhD but only part time with a science related job.

Would the ESRC also fund the PhD?
1
.ACS.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#20
Report 11 years ago
#20
(Original post by JohnnyHouse)
I would want to do a PhD but only part time with a science related job.

Would the ESRC also fund the PhD?
The ESRC only fund Economics and Social Sciences degrees. You would have to enquire about that at one of the science research councils, depending on your field. My guess is though, in your case your employer would have to fund you - though don't quote me on that.

You may want to ask about this in the postgraduate forum.
0
X
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,169

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Aberdeen
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Tue, 27 Aug '19
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate (MA) Open Day Postgraduate
    Sat, 31 Aug '19
  • University of Lincoln
    Guardian Offices, Kings Cross, London Postgraduate
    Mon, 2 Sep '19

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (220)
12.46%
Excited (166)
9.4%
Worried (308)
17.44%
Terrified (389)
22.03%
Meh (183)
10.36%
Confused (39)
2.21%
Putting on a brave face (244)
13.82%
Impatient (217)
12.29%

Watched Threads

View All