Advice on leaving a 40k job at 24 to go back to university and change career

Watch
lifeonacarousel
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
I'm currently working as a Network Engineer in London but I'm starting to feel like it's not the job for me. I turned 24 at the beginning of the year and I'm stuck in a mindset of whether I should leave my job to go back to uni and study mechanical/automotive engineering or stay in the current role im in.

If anyone has any advice on the uni courses themselves that'd be great but mainly Im wondering what life is like for a mature student at university, is there still a social setting that I wouldn't feel old in? Would I be placed in normal student accommodation? Is there different entry requirements for someone older going back to uni?
Is student finance different for a mature student?

Any advice or help would be appreciated.

*FYI I don't have kids or a mortgage, just a previous student loan & car finance.
0
reply
Rabbit2
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 months ago
#2
I hold a master's degree in electrical engineering [communications], and have spent about the last 30 years doing satellite communications engineering. I would think that either network or mechanical engineering should provide a lucrative and rewarding career. Perhaps the optimal 'fine tuning' of both would be the particular organization you are working for. I returned to graduate school after graduating with a bachelor's degree [BSEE] in 1969, and got my masters in 1987. Here in the states, most of the graduate students were ',mature' students, who were working full time 'day' jobs, whilest going to school one or two nights a week. Nearly all employers pay the students tuition for any degree course that is even loosely related to the employee's regular job - so costs are not an issue. Over my career, i worked for 10 or 12 different firms [including the US Federal Government]. While so employed, i worked on a variety of different projects. Some i really enjoyed, others not so much. I was motivated to change employers by a number of different factors: salary, perceived 'future' of the company i was employed by, opportunities for foreign travel... etc. Perhaps you might consider looking at potential jobs, and evaluating what you would have to do - course and degree-wise to qualify yourself for each of them, and what such qualification would 'cost' you in time, effort, and money. Best of luck!!
0
reply
Neilos
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 months ago
#3
(Original post by lifeonacarousel)
I'm currently working as a Network Engineer in London but I'm starting to feel like it's not the job for me. I turned 24 at the beginning of the year and I'm stuck in a mindset of whether I should leave my job to go back to uni and study mechanical/automotive engineering or stay in the current role im in.

If anyone has any advice on the uni courses themselves that'd be great but mainly Im wondering what life is like for a mature student at university, is there still a social setting that I wouldn't feel old in? Would I be placed in normal student accommodation? Is there different entry requirements for someone older going back to uni?
Is student finance different for a mature student?

Any advice or help would be appreciated.

*FYI I don't have kids or a mortgage, just a previous student loan & car finance.
I can't be of much use on the social stuff, courses, accomodation etc, but the finance for mature students is probably easier. Over 25s in FT are considered automatically indepedent, without the need for sending off lots of income data/proving no parental support.

But, if you've already used some/all of your entitlement (sounds like you have, if you hav a past student loan), that'll impact on whether they'll loan you the tuition fees.
0
reply
lifeonacarousel
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#4
So I spent one full term studying computer science before leaving for an apprenticeship where I was sent back to uni for an FdSc in Digital Media and IT. And have spent the past 4 years working for a 3rd line network support team.
My idea of going back to uni would be to do the mechanical/automotive engineering degree to pursue a career in motorsport (I'd hope).

I'm not sure how this affects my student finance etc and I dislike the word 'mature' student being only 24, I think I'm still young! I currently still live at home with parents also so not sure if that hold any weight anymore.

Thanks for the replies so far!
0
reply
trapking
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 months ago
#5
I want to quit mine as well how funny :laugh:

Honestly though don't go back to university that's a waste of time.

(Original post by lifeonacarousel)
So I spent one full term studying computer science before leaving for an apprenticeship where I was sent back to uni for an FdSc in Digital Media and IT. And have spent the past 4 years working for a 3rd line network support team.
My idea of going back to uni would be to do the mechanical/automotive engineering degree to pursue a career in motorsport (I'd hope).

I'm not sure how this affects my student finance etc and I dislike the word 'mature' student being only 24, I think I'm still young! I currently still live at home with parents also so not sure if that hold any weight anymore.

Thanks for the replies so far!
0
reply
alex282
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by lifeonacarousel)
I'm currently working as a Network Engineer in London but I'm starting to feel like it's not the job for me. I turned 24 at the beginning of the year and I'm stuck in a mindset of whether I should leave my job to go back to uni and study mechanical/automotive engineering or stay in the current role im in.

If anyone has any advice on the uni courses themselves that'd be great but mainly Im wondering what life is like for a mature student at university, is there still a social setting that I wouldn't feel old in? Would I be placed in normal student accommodation? Is there different entry requirements for someone older going back to uni?
Is student finance different for a mature student?

Any advice or help would be appreciated.

*FYI I don't have kids or a mortgage, just a previous student loan & car finance.
You don't think it's the job for you because you don't enjoy it, because it's hard or because it's not well paid enough?

In these days £40k at 24 is good even for London. I done MEng electrical engineering and people in my class were earning £27k in London upon graduation

Personally I wouldn't bother going back to university but if you are really passionate about mech eng and are prepared to lose out on money to go through that process then it's certainly not too late for you
0
reply
Rabbit2
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 months ago
#7
(Original post by alex282)
You don't think it's the job for you because you don't enjoy it, because it's hard or because it's not well paid enough?

In these days £40k at 24 is good even for London. I done MEng electrical engineering and people in my class were earning £27k in London upon graduation

Personally I wouldn't bother going back to university but if you are really passionate about mech eng and are prepared to lose out on money to go through that process then it's certainly not too late for you
I have some mates who have worked in the 'motorsport' business (as you put it), and they all found that the pay, and the way they were treated left a lot to be desired. I hold a masters degree in electrical engineering, and have worked about 20 years is satellite communications. In the states, someone with a bachelors in IT, with about 10 yrs experience, should be earning about $60,000 currently - roughly 40k quid. With a masters, you could add about 20 to 30k to that. Realistically, [on this side of the pond, and i suspect on your side], in order to run a reasonable sized project (say $1mill or more), and to have some say in what you are doing with it, you would need to have a master's degree. Without that, most people are going to figure that you don't really know what you are doing. This is true, when those making that judgement, don't have master's degrees in ANYTHING. They may be lucky to have even bachelor's degrees. Not fun, but there it is. I have [in my past life], been over-ruled on project management, had my decisions countermanded, by people who either had NO engineering degrees [one had - believe it or not - an ENGLISH bachelors], or no degree at all. On three separate occasions, this resulted in total disasters, one of which cost our employer [the US Federal Government], well over $1.5 million, and nearly 10 months of time. I objected to this change of course on the project, (perhaps too strenuously), and was over-ruled. The net result was that the person over-ruling me, was promoted for his error. I got nothing, and decided to leave the government, and go back and get my master's. That helped. I could have gone on and done a doctorate, but then, you tend to be considered "over-educated", and incapable of working with hardware - and i like hardware. With a master's in IT or engineering, i would think that someone with 10+ years of experience here, should be earning $70,000 to $80,000 at least. $100,000 would not be out of reach. I was earning nearly that when i semi-retired. Best of luck!!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you experienced financial difficulties as a student due to Covid-19?

Yes, I have really struggled financially (47)
18.01%
I have experienced some financial difficulties (73)
27.97%
I haven't experienced any financial difficulties and things have stayed the same (100)
38.31%
I have had better financial opportunities as a result of the pandemic (32)
12.26%
I've had another experience (let us know in the thread!) (9)
3.45%

Watched Threads

View All