Is anyone doing a neuroscience degree (UK) ???

Watch this thread
milliewolf
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Is anyone doing or going to do a neuroscience degree because there isn't much information about what it's like from a students perspective so I would be interested to know what its like or just any advice/information in general. Thank you!
0
reply
SweetSummerx
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by milliewolf)
Is anyone doing or going to do a neuroscience degree because there isn't much information about what it's like from a students perspective so I would be interested to know what its like or just any advice/information in general. Thank you!
I've just finished a masters degree in neuroscience so might be able to answer some questions for you
0
reply
milliewolf
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by SweetSummerx)
I've just finished a masters degree in neuroscience so might be able to answer some questions for you
How did you find it and did you do any placements or work experience and if so what did you do?
0
reply
SweetSummerx
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by milliewolf)
How did you find it and did you do any placements or work experience and if so what did you do?
As I did a 1 year masters I didn’t do a placement. Those who did an integrated masters (4 years) did summer placements at the uni to get lab experience.

I found the course really interesting and diverse. One of the units I took covered a range of experimental techniques. Others included stuff on immunology, biochemistry, synapses and neurodegenerative disease. It requires a lot of work and reading, I would say it’s probably one of the hardest degrees to do, possibly more so than medicine as it requires a great understanding of many processes, complicated anatomy and memorising even minute details. Whilst difficult it does lead to many research opportunities especially if you are willing to pursue a masters and/or PhD
Last edited by SweetSummerx; 2 years ago
0
reply
Keels25
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
Hey - I did a Neuroscience degree and graduated nearly two years ago now but happy to answer any questions.
0
reply
milliewolf
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by SweetSummerx)
As I did a 1 year masters I didn’t do a placement. Those who did an integrated masters (4 years) did summer placements at the uni to get lab experience.

I found the course really interesting and diverse. One of the units I took covered a range of experimental techniques. Others included stuff on immunology, biochemistry, synapses and neurodegenerative disease. It requires a lot of work and reading, I would say it’s probably one of the hardest degrees to do, possibly more so than medicine as it requires a great understanding of many processes, complicated anatomy and memorising even minute details. Whilst difficult it does lead to many research opportunities especially if you are willing to pursue a masters and/or PhD
Is there a lot of chemistry involved? Also where had the degree led you and what kind of job opportunities ate there
0
reply
Keels25
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by milliewolf)
Is there a lot of chemistry involved? Also where had the degree led you and what kind of job opportunities ate there
It depends what optional units you take - if you choose to take pharmacology and biochemistry units, there might be a bit of chemistry but you can pretty much avoid chemistry completely if you want to. I have a few friends who didn't study chemistry at A level and they found the course manageable.

So I've decided to apply for graduate entry medicine - and so I'm starting that in September.
But, there's lots you can do. Lots of people on my course went on to do Masters and some of them are doing PhDs. If you are interested in academic research you could do this - but I advise getting as much research experience that you can whilst doing your undergrad.
Some other people I know went straight into grad jobs e.g. companies like GSK - the roles you can do are pretty varied.
Others have done PGCSEs and are now science teachers.
Someone else I know is now working in banking.

There's lots you can do!
0
reply
milliewolf
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
Thank you so much!
0
reply
SweetSummerx
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by milliewolf)
Is there a lot of chemistry involved? Also where had the degree led you and what kind of job opportunities ate there
I agree with what @Keels25 has said. I didn't take chemistry A-Level and found it manageable (I only picked one chemistry unit which I found quite manageable so long as I kept up with the reading). There were a couple of pharmacology units, where chemistry would be useful but I know people who have done these units without a strong chemistry background and done well so it is not essential. The course is really diverse with many overlaps with different courses (pharmacology, medicine, biochemistry, biomedical just to name a few).

I am also looking at graduate entry medicine, but know people who have gone on to do a phd, research assistant and finance so careers are very diverse as well - pretty much anything maths or science related within reason you could end up doing.
0
reply
milliewolf
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by SweetSummerx)
I agree with what @Keels25 has said. I didn't take chemistry A-Level and found it manageable (I only picked one chemistry unit which I found quite manageable so long as I kept up with the reading). There were a couple of pharmacology units, where chemistry would be useful but I know people who have done these units without a strong chemistry background and done well so it is not essential. The course is really diverse with many overlaps with different courses (pharmacology, medicine, biochemistry, biomedical just to name a few).

I am also looking at graduate entry medicine, but know people who have gone on to do a phd, research assistant and finance so careers are very diverse as well - pretty much anything maths or science related within reason you could end up doing.
What were your favourite units/modules?
0
reply
SweetSummerx
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by milliewolf)
What were your favourite units/modules?
As I want to study medicine it’s probably no surprise I like the immunology and disease units (glial biology, cellular signalling in health and disease, neurodegenerative disease). I also like topics in neuroscience as it covered a range of experimental techniques
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

How did The Student Room help you with your university application?

Talking to current university students (8)
24.24%
Talking to peers going through the same thing (10)
30.3%
Speaking to student ambassadors from the universities (2)
6.06%
Speaking to staff members from universities (0)
0%
Using the personal statement builder, library or helper service (3)
9.09%
Reading articles about what steps to take (6)
18.18%
Learning about/speaking to Student Finance England (2)
6.06%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (2)
6.06%

Watched Threads

View All