General P
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Hi guys I would like to ask about having a games design degree. Are there any other fields a games design degree can get you? Because I like playing games and interested in technology in general but I myself after doing a lot of research don’t see myself working in the gaming industry I just don’t think it’s my field but I definitely want to get in the tech industry.

So basically what fields can a games design degree get you is it a versatile degree like others such as computer science or a computing course ? how far can a games design degree get you if you want to work in a different field ? Thank you
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LuigiMario
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Checkout Abertay University, they have good connx to games industry, as does the other Dundee university, (U o Dundee)

Computer science = Maths degree ( quite pure maths - generic future concepts of computing )

Do a bachelor degree in a subject that excites you, do great, then consider a Masters in something more nuanced (psychology of gaming, or role of gaming in surgical applications etc)

Sorted!

Enjoy!
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General P
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Checkout Abertay University, they have good connx to games industry, as does the other Dundee university, (U o Dundee)

Computer science = Maths degree ( quite pure maths - generic future concepts of computing )

Do a bachelor degree in a subject that excites you, do great, then consider a Masters in something more nuanced (psychology of gaming, or role of gaming in surgical applications etc)

Sorted!

Enjoy!
Thanks for the reply but that doesn’t answer my
question I’m basically saying how versatile is this degree because you could study CS and get into many fields but what about a games design degree ? Forget the gaming industry where else in the tech industry can a games design degree get me is the main question. sometimes you study a course you might like but find that later on maybe you don’t want to be in that field anymore (using games design as an example) so after getting that degree you want to look into a different field in the tech industry please tell what else this games design degree will get me if you know or someone else
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LuigiMario
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I’m working in a hard science research centre, nearly everyone has a doctorate in physics, some have PhD’s in energy or databases design, we do take students for a few months with just a bachelor in engineering.

You’d think therefore that Games Design would be fairly low on our list, but, one of our biggest communication successes (as doing science is one thing, but explaining to the rest of the world exactly, why, what are we doing, is perhaps more important) so my old department made a game, physical game, counters etc, board, and an online website and iOS & Android apps

So the communications, marketing industries should have a need for “people who have learned how to learn” - (LHTL) which is what any uni graduate should be, in any subject, such that you can solve any subsequent problem, whether in your narrow field of study or not...?

The old “traditional” answer to “what can I do with my ####### degree”, BC, before coronavirus pandemic, was that some big firms - e.g. British Airways, just need a graduate in ANYTHING,
and the same probably goes for Amazon-fodder.

AMZN is still recruiting, but BA is doing the opposite! So that’s a problem


I’ve said it before, that it doesn’t actually matter what you study for your first degree, nor where you study it. Provided you can actually apply yourself, enjoy the course and LHTL. It is critically important however that you very carefully choose which MSc to do, and where you study that, as that can be directly related to an employment opportunity. Plus, most undergrads by the time it comes to choosing a postgrad course, have matured a lot, experienced many things and are able to formulate a cunning plan....
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General P
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
I’m working in a hard science research centre, nearly everyone has a doctorate in physics, some have PhD’s in energy or databases design, we do take students for a few months with just a bachelor in engineering.

You’d think therefore that Games Design would be fairly low on our list, but, one of our biggest communication successes (as doing science is one thing, but explaining to the rest of the world exactly, why, what are we doing, is perhaps more important) so my old department made a game, physical game, counters etc, board, and an online website and iOS & Android apps

So the communications, marketing industries should have a need for “people who have learned how to learn” - (LHTL) which is what any uni graduate should be, in any subject, such that you can solve any subsequent problem, whether in your narrow field of study or not...?

The old “traditional” answer to “what can I do with my ####### degree”, BC, before coronavirus pandemic, was that some big firms - e.g. British Airways, just need a graduate in ANYTHING,
and the same probably goes for Amazon-fodder.

AMZN is still recruiting, but BA is doing the opposite! So that’s a problem


I’ve said it before, that it doesn’t actually matter what you study for your first degree, nor where you study it. Provided you can actually apply yourself, enjoy the course and LHTL. It is critically important however that you very carefully choose which MSc to do, and where you study that, as that can be directly related to an employment opportunity. Plus, most undergrads by the time it comes to choosing a postgrad course, have matured a lot, experienced many things and are able to formulate a cunning plan....
Ok just so you know a degree doesn’t guarantee you a job unless your degree is in the field which is instantly required and still relevant as well as high demand. most other fields employers don’t give a monkeys about your degree without experience especially in this day and age where ppl can get jobs in fields like computer science without degrees but they have experience and skills. A degree only improves your chances of getting a job it doesn’t guarantee it. Ppl without degrees but have experience and skill are just as likely to get jobs as to those with degrees at the end of the day it’s 50/50 some courses a masters degree is not needed.

As the years pass by degrees are only going to become irrelevant unless it’s a field that a degree is absolutely required like being a doctor or lawyer etc. It’s not worth being In £60k debt just to have a piece of Paper to your name on a degree that isn’t effective at all ppl go to uni just to then go back and work part time for 5 years.
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LuigiMario
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Except that “a degree”, any degree, is a good measure of an ability to concentrate on a problem {game design}, {law}, {geology} etc, that should impress a recruiter in any field.

Recently in Europe, I’ve noticed that many serious city based recruiters prefer those job candidates with at least a Master degree in the relevant area. UK market was (pre nCov-19) still looking for people with a degree. I can’t agree with future irrelevancy.

As a game developer, there will be many businesses who would simply use your knowledge of Scratch, python, html, C++, for business coding, web design etc. This could be simply learnt at home, from YouTube vids, but missing that ‘degree’ - means a difficulty in competing with those with a degree in sociology or religion. I suggest a degree is good, a Master will get you places.

Many foreign places (NZ, USA?) require a degree for immigration purposes, should one need to escape from the BoJos of the UK....
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General P
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Except that “a degree”, any degree, is a good measure of an ability to concentrate on a problem {game design}, {law}, {geology} etc, that should impress a recruiter in any field.

Recently in Europe, I’ve noticed that many serious city based recruiters prefer those job candidates with at least a Master degree in the relevant area. UK market was (pre nCov-19) still looking for people with a degree. I can’t agree with future irrelevancy.

As a game developer, there will be many businesses who would simply use your knowledge of Scratch, python, html, C++, for business coding, web design etc. This could be simply learnt at home, from YouTube vids, but missing that ‘degree’ - means a difficulty in competing with those with a degree in sociology or religion. I suggest a degree is good, a Master will get you places.

Many foreign places (NZ, USA?) require a degree for immigration purposes, should one need to escape from the BoJos of the UK....
I mean you are right you aren’t wrong but are you trying to tell me that let’s say someone who dropped out of uni or didn’t go to uni spent 2, 3 or 4 years being self taught on coding and even worked at real places to gain more experience is less likely to get a job than someone who went to uni for 5 years in a degree like sociology or even CS but no experience? so someone who did 3-4 years with a CS degree or any degree but literally no experience are u saying the employer is going to pick the person with the degree when they could easily pick someone who didn’t go to uni or dropped out but spent 2-4 years enhancing their skills and experience in coding? In case you didn’t know big big companies like Facebook and google and even twitter don’t actually care about degrees anymore they even dropped that requirement now because they realise that ppl who actually have experience and skill are worthy of the job more than someone who went to uni for 4 years with no experience or skill. some fields yes your right you still need a degree but at the same time you don’t,

In my opinion people who didn’t want to go to uni or dropped out but found a way to get very good jobs in fields like computer science, or web design etc should be just as respected as to those with degrees because I don’t think you understand how hard it is to be learning on your own everyday being self taught and landing a job both sides should be treated equally in my opinion. even for game development or design you literally need a fantastic portfolio and boom you have the job.
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LuigiMario
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(Original post by General P)
In my opinion people who didn’t want to go to uni or dropped out but found a way to get very good jobs in fields like computer science, or web design etc should be just as respected as to those with degrees
Yes, that’s definitely accurate!

However for some international visas, it helps to have “a degree”

Personally (this is a family account, so it’s multifaceted) I topped-out with an HNC, and a year of an OU science degree. It never harmed my career, but I accidentally made all the right choices.

For TSR youth, I think the best advice is to get a degree , if at all possible, in something/anything that you would enjoy doing for 3 or 4 years. But I do agree that there are other paths and serendipity exists
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