Is it bad that I don't care about VE Day?

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CalFin
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Hi,
I was just wondering if it's bad that I really don't care about VE Day? I'm British through and through and I don't know if I had any family that fought in the war but still, I just don't care. I don't mean to be disrespectful in anyway so please don't be offended but is it bad at all? Like it's a war that's in the past and the soldiers that died get celebrated all the time. Why can't we just leave it in the past?
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ecolier
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(Original post by redblackwhite)
Hi,
I was just wondering if it's bad that I really don't care about VE Day? I'm British through and through and I don't know if I had any family that fought in the war but still, I just don't care. I don't mean to be disrespectful in anyway so please don't be offended but is it bad at all? Like it's a war that's in the past and the soldiers that died get celebrated all the time. Why can't we just leave it in the past?
It's not bad but it doesn't mean it's good.

I mean people have died defending this country so it's just a mark of respect.

Of course you are allowed to feel indifferent, that's what your right because you live in a free country.
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TheMandalorian
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You are entitled to your opinion though it is not a very well thought out one. If we had the attitude of let’s just leave things in the past there would be no reason to study history.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by redblackwhite)
Hi,
I was just wondering if it's bad that I really don't care about VE Day? I'm British through and through and I don't know if I had any family that fought in the war but still, I just don't care. I don't mean to be disrespectful in anyway so please don't be offended but is it bad at all? Like it's a war that's in the past and the soldiers that died get celebrated all the time. Why can't we just leave it in the past?
It's just a sign of immaturity and lack of life experience. You haven't seen enough of life to realise what a terrible impact it had on people's lives. It knocks our current situation into a cocked hat and reflects pretty badly on modern society that we are flaking about the changes that have happened over recent months, and the state of the economy etc. compared with the years before VE Day.

Put yourself in the position you'd have been in back in the war - presumably you're about GCSE level? So, no GCSEs, given a few days notice and evacuated to some other part of the country and/or you are expected to work on a farm if not full time. No prospect of any further education, and in 2-3 years time you'll be called up and go to war. You'll spend two years stomping across Europe, being shelled, shot at and seeing some terrible sights. What do you think VE Day would mean to you then?

And where would we be now if hundreds and thousands of kids your age hadn't gone through a similar experience? It's a matter of understanding and empathy and gratitude for the strength and resilience of the people that did go through all that and enabled the UK and Europe to develop the way it has ever since - because the other option would be very different. It's fine if you don't get that now, but hopefully you will by the 80th anniversary!
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CoolCavy
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I'm very into military history and my personal preference is more silent remembrance. I understand completely why people had such a big party when the war ended and even generations after as the effects of the war were felt for decades after. The big celebrations now kind of seem redundant in my opinion, very few people who served in WWII are still alive. People celebrating something they had no involvement in doesn't make much sense to me personally, with WWII especially I oftentimes think there is a sense of glorification and rose tinted glasses. Life in the 1940s was very difficult and the blitz was horrific. It wasnt all street parties, vera Lynn, home baking and patriotism as some people seem to think.
WWII was the last real decisive victory British forces experienced with regards to defence. Similar patriotism and excitement was seen with the Falklands but its legacy has differed due to some people sympathising with Argentina's viewpoint even if the Falklands themselves are highly in favour of british occupation.
WWII is nice and simple to reduce down, people like to hark back to it and celebrate it because unlike many modern conflicts it was a simple case of we were the good guys and the axis were the bad guys. Obviously fascism is an abhorrent ideology and the brave men and women who were involved in its defeat should always be remembered and honoured but it's not quite as simple as people like to make out. Not every single person in the German army was a nazi, the average private was just doing what they saw as their duty. The commanding nazi officers were one thing but the vast majority of the German military forces were ordinary boys simply naive enough to believe in the Hitler myth. These people died too.
If people want to celebrate that's their prerogative and I dont think anyone would begrudge them for it, especially in these current times when the nation could do with a bit of unity. There is also nothing wrong with quietly remembering.
Last edited by CoolCavy; 1 year ago
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Toscana
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In my opinion, yes it is bad. I don’t speak for everyone but I think it’s quite disrespectful
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gjd800
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
I'm very into military history and my personal preference is more silent remembrance. I understand completely why people had such a big party when the war ended and even generations after as the effects of the war were felt for decades after. The big celebrations now kind of seem redundant in my opinion, very few people who served in WWII are still alive. People celebrating something they had no involvement in doesn't make much sense to me personally, with WWII especially I oftentimes think there is a sense of glorification and rose tinted glasses. Life in the 1940s was very difficult and the blitz was horrific. It wasnt all street parties, vera Lynn, home baking and patriotism as some people seem to think.
WWII was the last real decisive victory British forces experienced with regards to defence. Similar patriotism and excitement was seen with the Falklands but its legacy has differed due to some people sympathising with Argentina's viewpoint even if the Falklands themselves are highly in favour of british occupation.
WWII is nice and simple to reduce down, people like to hark back to it and celebrate it because unlike many modern conflicts it was a simple case of we were the good guys and the axis were the bad guys. Obviously fascism is an abhorrent ideology and the brave men and women who were involved in its defeat should always be remembered and honoured but it's not quite as simple as people like to make out. Not every single person in the German army was a nazi, the average private was just doing what they saw as their duty. The commanding nazi officers were one thing but the vast majority of the German military forces were ordinary boys simply naive enough to believe in the Hitler myth. These people died too.
If people want to celebrate that's their prerogative and I dont think anyone would begrudge them for it, especially in these current times when the nation could do with a bit of unity. There is also nothing wrong with quietly remembering.
My aul fella said his Dad would have cringed watching young people do a conga 75 years later in 'memory' of the ****e he had to do and live through. I think it should be marked, and I think it should be seen as a pan-European liberation day. We aren't at war now, and the anti-German sentiment I saw on my Twitter feed yesterday was really disappointing.

My Mum's Dad fought on in the Pacific until the last combat missions flew from his ship in September '45, so another thing that annoys me is the 'end of the war' rhetoric. In Europe. Not everywhere.

:Like you, I have a nuanced stance on it
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by gjd800)
My aul fella said his Dad would have cringed watching young people do a conga 75 years later in 'memory' of the ****e he had to do and live through. I think it should be marked, and I think it should be seen as a pan-European liberation day. We aren't at war now, and the anti-German sentiment I saw on my Twitter feed yesterday was really disappointing.

My Mum's Dad fought on in the Pacific until the last combat missions flew from his ship in September '45, so another thing that annoys me is the 'end of the war' rhetoric. In Europe. Not everywhere.

:Like you, I have a nuanced stance on it
Perfectly said :hugs:
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