askingforafrien
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Hi, I'm interested in applying to Sheffield and SOAS to study Korean. I am having some doubts as to whether it is a smart decision. I am very academic and do well in school, I have a keen interest in Korea, the language and culture. However, in the past I have frequently had sudden changes of heart in terms of what I want to do. (From Zoology to Linguistics to Korean etc. ) Since I have always been equally good at all subjects, I have never really had one specific career goal in mind. (I hope i'm not sounding big headed i'm just trying to paint the picture)
Anyway, I am wondering whether it would be a good choice to choose to study Korean in terms of getting a job later on. I know Korea has strict rules in terms of working in the field the person has a degree in. I don't really know how that would relate to me if I had a degree in Korean. What kind of limitations would that bring?
If I chose to stay in the UK what kind of jobs would be available. I am really unfit to work from home therefore I'm not sure working as a freelance translator would be the route for me.
I am just asking for some general advice from people who have or are studying Korean at Sheffield (or elsewhere). I'm just worried I will waste away going through with this.
Thank you in advance to anyone giving up their time to answer my questions.
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Toscana
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Yeah, if you want to work in South Korea then its pretty damn useful. It would go well with some other degree too
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DoNotMove
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
Hi, I'm interested in applying to Sheffield and SOAS to study Korean. I am having some doubts as to whether it is a smart decision. I am very academic and do well in school, I have a keen interest in Korea, the language and culture. However, in the past I have frequently had sudden changes of heart in terms of what I want to do. (From Zoology to Linguistics to Korean etc. ) Since I have always been equally good at all subjects, I have never really had one specific career goal in mind. (I hope i'm not sounding big headed i'm just trying to paint the picture)
Anyway, I am wondering whether it would be a good choice to choose to study Korean in terms of getting a job later on. I know Korea has strict rules in terms of working in the field the person has a degree in. I don't really know how that would relate to me if I had a degree in Korean. What kind of limitations would that bring?
If I chose to stay in the UK what kind of jobs would be available. I am really unfit to work from home therefore I'm not sure working as a freelance translator would be the route for me.
I am just asking for some general advice from people who have or are studying Korean at Sheffield (or elsewhere). I'm just worried I will waste away going through with this.
Thank you in advance to anyone giving up their time to answer my questions.
Having a degree in Korean does not mean you will be able to work in Korea, unless you train as a translator or similar - after all, everyone else in Korea also speaks Korean. A joint honours may be good so that you have more options.
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Toscana
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(Original post by DoNotMove)
Having a degree in Korean does not mean you will be able to work in Korea, unless you train as a translator or similar - after all, everyone else in Korea also speaks Korean. A joint honours may be good so that you have more options.
She could become an English teacher
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DoNotMove
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(Original post by Toscana)
She could become an English teacher
Yes but in general, the only jobs you could get in Korea with a Korean degree would be related to teaching English, translating between English and Korean etc. I knew someone who took French at degree level and then just expected to be able to go to France, and pick whatever job took her fancy.
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askingforafrien
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(Original post by DoNotMove)
Having a degree in Korean does not mean you will be able to work in Korea, unless you train as a translator or similar - after all, everyone else in Korea also speaks Korean. A joint honours may be good so that you have more options.
So do you suggest that having a degree in Korean ONLY would be useless?
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askingforafrien
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(Original post by Toscana)
Yeah, if you want to work in South Korea then its pretty damn useful. It would go well with some other degree too
See this is my struggle as there is a very limited choice in Dual degrees. In Sheffield, I could only do a joint with Japanese or with music. Neither of these interests me in any way. There is more of a choice in SOAS but there are many reasons for which I wouldn't want to study there- it's expensive, less safe than Sheffield, very political etc. So in your opinion would it be best for me to do an undergrad in Korean followed by a postgrad in something else? What do you think?
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Toscana
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
See this is my struggle as there is a very limited choice in Dual degrees. In Sheffield, I could only do a joint with Japanese or with music. Neither of these interests me in any way. There is more of a choice in SOAS but there are many reasons for which I wouldn't want to study there- it's expensive, less safe than Sheffield, very political etc. So in your opinion would it be best for me to do an undergrad in Korean followed by a postgrad in something else? What do you think?
Honestly, you’re better off asking the others lol. You could do linguistics with korean if that’s a choice and then become a speech therapist like I’m planning to. I’m studying italian and linguistics in September so I can become a speech therapist in italy
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DoNotMove
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
So do you suggest that having a degree in Korean ONLY would be useless?
Unless you want to be a translator or teacher (and even then you'd need a PGCE).
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umbrellala
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
Hi, I'm interested in applying to Sheffield and SOAS to study Korean. I am having some doubts as to whether it is a smart decision. I am very academic and do well in school, I have a keen interest in Korea, the language and culture. However, in the past I have frequently had sudden changes of heart in terms of what I want to do. (From Zoology to Linguistics to Korean etc. ) Since I have always been equally good at all subjects, I have never really had one specific career goal in mind. (I hope i'm not sounding big headed i'm just trying to paint the picture)
Anyway, I am wondering whether it would be a good choice to choose to study Korean in terms of getting a job later on. I know Korea has strict rules in terms of working in the field the person has a degree in. I don't really know how that would relate to me if I had a degree in Korean. What kind of limitations would that bring?
If I chose to stay in the UK what kind of jobs would be available. I am really unfit to work from home therefore I'm not sure working as a freelance translator would be the route for me.
I am just asking for some general advice from people who have or are studying Korean at Sheffield (or elsewhere). I'm just worried I will waste away going through with this.
Thank you in advance to anyone giving up their time to answer my questions.
Korean student at SOAS here, I would say that if you were otherwise going to do a humanities degree, it doesn't make a whole world of difference to your options. The main pathways you're cutting off are those in the sciences, law, finance and arts (even in the arts there may be some opportunities though). Many graduate jobs just require a degree rather than a specific degree so your options will still be relatively open in the UK. As for Korea, as your suggested there are big visa restrictions to working in Korea unless you are an English teacher which doesn't really have any opportunities for promotion so is often a short-term job rather than a life long career. The other way foreign workers get into Korea is by already being experts in their field, usually having expertise in something that is rarely found within the Korean population. You either have to have a very specific skillset (people in creative subjects like design often get into Korean companies) or you're already very advanced in your career and a company is looking for your specific expertise.

Personally I'm transferring to dual honours with international relations this year not necessarily because of job prospects but because I'm considering a masters in East Asian IR so it just makes sense. Also, it's very difficult to find internships with a Korean degree and is miles easier with a humanities one. That being said, you don't really need to do internships, I'm just keen on doing one or two since I'm looking to go into politics or potentially political journalism where that kind of thing is more sought after. But my biggest aspiration at the moment is to go into the civil service fast stream and be a government advisor of some sort! Anyway, if you have any other questions I'd be more than happy to answer
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askingforafrien
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(Original post by umbrellala)
Korean student at SOAS here, I would say that if you were otherwise going to do a humanities degree, it doesn't make a whole world of difference to your options. The main pathways you're cutting off are those in the sciences, law, finance and arts (even in the arts there may be some opportunities though). Many graduate jobs just require a degree rather than a specific degree so your options will still be relatively open in the UK. As for Korea, as your suggested there are big visa restrictions to working in Korea unless you are an English teacher which doesn't really have any opportunities for promotion so is often a short-term job rather than a life long career. The other way foreign workers get into Korea is by already being experts in their field, usually having expertise in something that is rarely found within the Korean population. You either have to have a very specific skillset (people in creative subjects like design often get into Korean companies) or you're already very advanced in your career and a company is looking for your specific expertise.

Personally I'm transferring to dual honours with international relations this year not necessarily because of job prospects but because I'm considering a masters in East Asian IR so it just makes sense. Also, it's very difficult to find internships with a Korean degree and is miles easier with a humanities one. That being said, you don't really need to do internships, I'm just keen on doing one or two since I'm looking to go into politics or potentially political journalism where that kind of thing is more sought after. But my biggest aspiration at the moment is to go into the civil service fast stream and be a government advisor of some sort! Anyway, if you have any other questions I'd be more than happy to answer
Thank you so much! I am very grateful to have the opportunity to ask you some questions, I hope you won't mind my list:

1) Why did you choose SOAS? Did you consider other universities or did you always want to go there?

2) To what extent do you feel your degree is preparing you for fluency? Do you feel that by the end of your degree you will be at fluent/ translator level?

3) What is your honest opinion on SOAS? Please give both pros and cons. I am interested in the amount of help/ support you get from your teachers. I am aware than in any uni the main part of the learning will be independent but it is still important to have decent teachers.

4)Do you feel safe studying there? One of my concerns is the fact that if I have a choice between Sheffield (the safest city in the UK) and London then of course in terms of safety, Sheffield is the place to be.

5) Does it bother you that SOAS isn't a Russell Group uni? Do you feel that it sets you at a disadvantage to those going to Russel Group unis?

6) Do you know anyone who will be going into Korean film translation or anything related? What kind of route do they need to go down to achieve that?

7) Do you feel that by the end of the degree it is likely I would be able to live a comfortable and financially stable life? (I don't mean will I be rich, I just want to know if I will be able to survive on my own)

8) How much choice do you get in terms of the Korean uni you go to for the year abroad? (I know SOAS has contracts with 2 unis so how do they decide which one you go to)

9) When transitioning to do dual honours what part of your original degree are you sacrificing?

10) How confident are you that after completing this degree you could get a job related to the Korean half of it? So if I didn't do dual honours and just stuck with Korean how achievable is a job in the field?

11) Is it true that SOAS is extremely political and filled with propaganda? Do you ever feel oppressed or uncomfortable due to this?

12) Do you regret your choice or do you think studying the language at degree level is useless when others learn languages at home?

13) What is your opinion about the 'open modules/ options' so taking credits in other fields? I have really struggled to find out whether or not Sheffield offer these credits from other fields. If you know anything about this please share, if not don't worry about it.

I have asked a lot so please do not feel pressured to reply. The reason why I have so many questions is that I wasn't able to go to the open day this year due to quarantine. If you do choose to answer then thank you a million times over. You are a lifesaver and, at present, my only source of help/ answers.
I hope you have a fantastic day.
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umbrellala
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
Thank you so much! I am very grateful to have the opportunity to ask you some questions, I hope you won't mind my list:

1) Why did you choose SOAS? Did you consider other universities or did you always want to go there?

2) To what extent do you feel your degree is preparing you for fluency? Do you feel that by the end of your degree you will be at fluent/ translator level?

3) What is your honest opinion on SOAS? Please give both pros and cons. I am interested in the amount of help/ support you get from your teachers. I am aware than in any uni the main part of the learning will be independent but it is still important to have decent teachers.

4)Do you feel safe studying there? One of my concerns is the fact that if I have a choice between Sheffield (the safest city in the UK) and London then of course in terms of safety, Sheffield is the place to be.

5) Does it bother you that SOAS isn't a Russell Group uni? Do you feel that it sets you at a disadvantage to those going to Russel Group unis?

6) Do you know anyone who will be going into Korean film translation or anything related? What kind of route do they need to go down to achieve that?

7) Do you feel that by the end of the degree it is likely I would be able to live a comfortable and financially stable life? (I don't mean will I be rich, I just want to know if I will be able to survive on my own)

8) How much choice do you get in terms of the Korean uni you go to for the year abroad? (I know SOAS has contracts with 2 unis so how do they decide which one you go to)

9) When transitioning to do dual honours what part of your original degree are you sacrificing?

10) How confident are you that after completing this degree you could get a job related to the Korean half of it? So if I didn't do dual honours and just stuck with Korean how achievable is a job in the field?

11) Is it true that SOAS is extremely political and filled with propaganda? Do you ever feel oppressed or uncomfortable due to this?

12) Do you regret your choice or do you think studying the language at degree level is useless when others learn languages at home?

13) What is your opinion about the 'open modules/ options' so taking credits in other fields? I have really struggled to find out whether or not Sheffield offer these credits from other fields. If you know anything about this please share, if not don't worry about it.

I have asked a lot so please do not feel pressured to reply. The reason why I have so many questions is that I wasn't able to go to the open day this year due to quarantine. If you do choose to answer then thank you a million times over. You are a lifesaver and, at present, my only source of help/ answers.
I hope you have a fantastic day.
1) Why did you choose SOAS? Did you consider other universities or did you always want to go there?
I strongly considered Sheffield and visited both more than once. I was really torn but without sounding too cringey Sheffield just didn't have the right vibe for me. There was nothing in theory I could fault it on but the feeling just wasn't right. I think what drew me to SOAS was that it had a very academic feeling without being overly serious and their department has the best experts in the UK and most likely Europe (if you're to believe their website). The Korean & Japanese department felt like such a core part of the uni whereas at Sheffield it felt like some small add-on and not particularly important. SOAS were up-front about the workload, clear that they wouldn't spoon-feed or baby us, and were obviously looking for people who were going to throw themselves into it. I also chose it for the career prospects, particularly the prospects abroad, and for the modules they offered.

2) To what extent do you feel your degree is preparing you for fluency? Do you feel that by the end of your degree you will be at fluent/ translator level?
Having spoken to third and fourth years, their level totally blew me away. I would say you'll definitely be fluent conversationally by the end of the degree and have a strong grasp of a good range of subjects. You're definitely well prepared to go into the field of translation, although usually you are required to do some sort of post-grad training before you become a full-time translator

3) What is your honest opinion on SOAS? Please give both pros and cons. I am interested in the amount of help/ support you get from your teachers. I am aware than in any uni the main part of the learning will be independent but it is still important to have decent teachers.
I actually have some threads on my experience at SOAS if you're interested! The teachers, especially for Korean, were incredible and I really can't fault them. They'll give you any support you need and really push you to do the best they know you can do. I personally loved the SOAS environment and everything about it academically. I suppose the main cons would be that having a vibrant social life requires a bit more effort and input than at other unis, but it's totally possible to have the kind of social life you want. The biggest con in my mind is the cost. London is expensive and whilst I got by just fine in first year that's because I rarely drank alcohol or ate out or had much of a life outside uni to be totally honest. It can get difficult and the rent is crazy!

4)Do you feel safe studying there? One of my concerns is the fact that if I have a choice between Sheffield (the safest city in the UK) and London then of course in terms of safety, Sheffield is the place to be.
To be totally honest safety was never a big consideration for me. I grew up in a commuter city to London which, whilst not dangerous, was by no means an idyllic little village where not much happened - there were many moments growing up where I'd feel unsafe, especially in the dark. So going into London wasn't a massive adjustment. My parents have both worked there for most of my life and I'd been there multiple times by myself or with friends throughout my teenage years so it really didn't cross my mind much. Studying at the university itself I never felt unsafe, but of course when you're out and about you have to be a bit wary of pickpockets and things like that. I didn't go around late at night and there were occasionally incidents nearby but I wouldn't say I felt unsafe on a regular basis by any means.

5) Does it bother you that SOAS isn't a Russell Group uni? Do you feel that it sets you at a disadvantage to those going to Russel Group unis?
Nope, not at all. Actually, since it's such an usual subject it's quite nice to know I'm at a university that specialises in these things and is probably the best equipped to teach it

6) Do you know anyone who will be going into Korean film translation or anything related? What kind of route do they need to go down to achieve that?
Not that I know of sorry! I'm not aiming to go into translation so I can't offer you much in that regard

7) Do you feel that by the end of the degree it is likely I would be able to live a comfortable and financially stable life? (I don't mean will I be rich, I just want to know if I will be able to survive on my own)
Yes, of course it depends what field you go into but if you choose a path which will lead to that then you'll be absolutely fine

8) How much choice do you get in terms of the Korean uni you go to for the year abroad? (I know SOAS has contracts with 2 unis so how do they decide which one you go to)
We could choose between SNU, Korea University, Sogang and Hankuk. You submit a form with a ranking of where you want to go and then you're allocated your place by the teachers. If your grades are good you'll almost certainly get first choice. If they're not, other people will get priority over you. The only exception is SNU where they're stricter about who they let apply

9) When transitioning to do dual honours what part of your original degree are you sacrificing?
Only my optional modules

10) How confident are you that after completing this degree you could get a job related to the Korean half of it? So if I didn't do dual honours and just stuck with Korean how achievable is a job in the field?
Doing a job directly related to Korean has never been what I've planned to do so I'm fairly confident that I won't. If you do just Korean (or a dual honours for that matter) you'll be in a great position to go into a Korea-related job

11) Is it true that SOAS is extremely political and filled with propaganda? Do you ever feel oppressed or uncomfortable due to this?
I would say propaganda is a bit strong, the university doesn't actually promote any of the strong political views, but a lot of the students are very political and often involved in activism. I wouldn't say I've felt oppressed or uncomfortable. There's nothing particularly oppressing about it, I've never had anyone force any of their views upon me but then again I'm pretty left wing anyway so I rarely totally disagree with the position of a lot of the political stuff and I don't tend to get involved in the political scene. I think right-wing students will feel uncomfortable at any university, it just so happens that SOAS students are more vocal about their views

12) Do you regret your choice or do you think studying the language at degree level is useless when others learn languages at home?
Nope, not at all. I personally thrive in academic environments and have failed to stick to self-teaching so many times that I know I wouldn't be able to do this by myself. And, degrees are way more than just the raw content that you learn, there's so much that goes into getting a degree and the experiences that come with it so I wouldn't change it for the world

13) What is your opinion about the 'open modules/ options' so taking credits in other fields? I have really struggled to find out whether or not Sheffield offer these credits from other fields. If you know anything about this please share, if not don't worry about it.
Very highly recommend it! It helps to broaden your knowledge since Korean by itself in quite specific and sometimes it's nice to be able to do something a bit different. It helps keep other passions going or can open you up to something totally new. Even in first year all of my 30 open option credits were spent on International Relations and I loved it so much that I'm now doing my dual honours with it, so if you choose wisely it can be great If there's not much info about it on the Sheffield website then definitely get in contact with the programme convenor to ask about it!
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askingforafrien
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(Original post by umbrellala)
1) Why did you choose SOAS? Did you consider other universities or did you always want to go there?
I strongly considered Sheffield and visited both more than once. I was really torn but without sounding too cringey Sheffield just didn't have the right vibe for me. There was nothing in theory I could fault it on but the feeling just wasn't right. I think what drew me to SOAS was that it had a very academic feeling without being overly serious and their department has the best experts in the UK and most likely Europe (if you're to believe their website). The Korean & Japanese department felt like such a core part of the uni whereas at Sheffield it felt like some small add-on and not particularly important. SOAS were up-front about the workload, clear that they wouldn't spoon-feed or baby us, and were obviously looking for people who were going to throw themselves into it. I also chose it for the career prospects, particularly the prospects abroad, and for the modules they offered.

2) To what extent do you feel your degree is preparing you for fluency? Do you feel that by the end of your degree you will be at fluent/ translator level?
Having spoken to third and fourth years, their level totally blew me away. I would say you'll definitely be fluent conversationally by the end of the degree and have a strong grasp of a good range of subjects. You're definitely well prepared to go into the field of translation, although usually you are required to do some sort of post-grad training before you become a full-time translator

3) What is your honest opinion on SOAS? Please give both pros and cons. I am interested in the amount of help/ support you get from your teachers. I am aware than in any uni the main part of the learning will be independent but it is still important to have decent teachers.
I actually have some threads on my experience at SOAS if you're interested! The teachers, especially for Korean, were incredible and I really can't fault them. They'll give you any support you need and really push you to do the best they know you can do. I personally loved the SOAS environment and everything about it academically. I suppose the main cons would be that having a vibrant social life requires a bit more effort and input than at other unis, but it's totally possible to have the kind of social life you want. The biggest con in my mind is the cost. London is expensive and whilst I got by just fine in first year that's because I rarely drank alcohol or ate out or had much of a life outside uni to be totally honest. It can get difficult and the rent is crazy!

4)Do you feel safe studying there? One of my concerns is the fact that if I have a choice between Sheffield (the safest city in the UK) and London then of course in terms of safety, Sheffield is the place to be.
To be totally honest safety was never a big consideration for me. I grew up in a commuter city to London which, whilst not dangerous, was by no means an idyllic little village where not much happened - there were many moments growing up where I'd feel unsafe, especially in the dark. So going into London wasn't a massive adjustment. My parents have both worked there for most of my life and I'd been there multiple times by myself or with friends throughout my teenage years so it really didn't cross my mind much. Studying at the university itself I never felt unsafe, but of course when you're out and about you have to be a bit wary of pickpockets and things like that. I didn't go around late at night and there were occasionally incidents nearby but I wouldn't say I felt unsafe on a regular basis by any means.

5) Does it bother you that SOAS isn't a Russell Group uni? Do you feel that it sets you at a disadvantage to those going to Russel Group unis?
Nope, not at all. Actually, since it's such an usual subject it's quite nice to know I'm at a university that specialises in these things and is probably the best equipped to teach it

6) Do you know anyone who will be going into Korean film translation or anything related? What kind of route do they need to go down to achieve that?
Not that I know of sorry! I'm not aiming to go into translation so I can't offer you much in that regard

7) Do you feel that by the end of the degree it is likely I would be able to live a comfortable and financially stable life? (I don't mean will I be rich, I just want to know if I will be able to survive on my own)
Yes, of course it depends what field you go into but if you choose a path which will lead to that then you'll be absolutely fine

8) How much choice do you get in terms of the Korean uni you go to for the year abroad? (I know SOAS has contracts with 2 unis so how do they decide which one you go to)
We could choose between SNU, Korea University, Sogang and Hankuk. You submit a form with a ranking of where you want to go and then you're allocated your place by the teachers. If your grades are good you'll almost certainly get first choice. If they're not, other people will get priority over you. The only exception is SNU where they're stricter about who they let apply

9) When transitioning to do dual honours what part of your original degree are you sacrificing?
Only my optional modules

10) How confident are you that after completing this degree you could get a job related to the Korean half of it? So if I didn't do dual honours and just stuck with Korean how achievable is a job in the field?
Doing a job directly related to Korean has never been what I've planned to do so I'm fairly confident that I won't. If you do just Korean (or a dual honours for that matter) you'll be in a great position to go into a Korea-related job

11) Is it true that SOAS is extremely political and filled with propaganda? Do you ever feel oppressed or uncomfortable due to this?
I would say propaganda is a bit strong, the university doesn't actually promote any of the strong political views, but a lot of the students are very political and often involved in activism. I wouldn't say I've felt oppressed or uncomfortable. There's nothing particularly oppressing about it, I've never had anyone force any of their views upon me but then again I'm pretty left wing anyway so I rarely totally disagree with the position of a lot of the political stuff and I don't tend to get involved in the political scene. I think right-wing students will feel uncomfortable at any university, it just so happens that SOAS students are more vocal about their views

12) Do you regret your choice or do you think studying the language at degree level is useless when others learn languages at home?
Nope, not at all. I personally thrive in academic environments and have failed to stick to self-teaching so many times that I know I wouldn't be able to do this by myself. And, degrees are way more than just the raw content that you learn, there's so much that goes into getting a degree and the experiences that come with it so I wouldn't change it for the world

13) What is your opinion about the 'open modules/ options' so taking credits in other fields? I have really struggled to find out whether or not Sheffield offer these credits from other fields. If you know anything about this please share, if not don't worry about it.
Very highly recommend it! It helps to broaden your knowledge since Korean by itself in quite specific and sometimes it's nice to be able to do something a bit different. It helps keep other passions going or can open you up to something totally new. Even in first year all of my 30 open option credits were spent on International Relations and I loved it so much that I'm now doing my dual honours with it, so if you choose wisely it can be great If there's not much info about it on the Sheffield website then definitely get in contact with the programme convenor to ask about it!
I am so unbelievably grateful for your help. You are a lifesaver, thank you so much. I haven't been able to get help from anywhere else so honestly thank you.
I agree with what you said about not getting a good vibe from Sheffield. I went to their open day at the start of the year (when I had just started year 12) and I was so sad because I went there convinced that it would be my uni. When I got there, so many things just didn't seem right. The staff weren't very nice to me and I just didn't feel at home there. I am still strongly considering it because of the other plus sides such as the greenery, how cheap it is, the student union, the location of the uni. I am someone who greatly struggles in crowds. Although I'm very confident and outgoing, crowds give me huge anxiety and for that reason, I haven't put as much thought into SOAS as I feel London will always be significantly more crowded. But at the end of the day, it's uni- of course, there will be loads of people wherever I go.
I also didn't realise that SOAS has contracts with SN, I thought of the top three, they only had contracts with Korea Uni. That changes a lot as Sheffield also has contracts with two out of the three.
You have given me a lot to think about. Thank you. You're a star.
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umbrellala
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
I am so unbelievably grateful for your help. You are a lifesaver, thank you so much. I haven't been able to get help from anywhere else so honestly thank you.
I agree with what you said about not getting a good vibe from Sheffield. I went to their open day at the start of the year (when I had just started year 12) and I was so sad because I went there convinced that it would be my uni. When I got there, so many things just didn't seem right. The staff weren't very nice to me and I just didn't feel at home there. I am still strongly considering it because of the other plus sides such as the greenery, how cheap it is, the student union, the location of the uni. I am someone who greatly struggles in crowds. Although I'm very confident and outgoing, crowds give me huge anxiety and for that reason, I haven't put as much thought into SOAS as I feel London will always be significantly more crowded. But at the end of the day, it's uni- of course, there will be loads of people wherever I go.
I also didn't realise that SOAS has contracts with SN, I thought of the top three, they only had contracts with Korea Uni. That changes a lot as Sheffield also has contracts with two out of the three.
You have given me a lot to think about. Thank you. You're a star.
Honestly I did struggle with the lack of greenery in London at the start which sounds weird but I realised that living in the 'concrete jungle' for so long and always being around busy-ness and rushing people made me quite anxious. I ended up changing the route I walked to uni so I could go through a park and see dogs running around every morning and it helped so much haha I think as long as you develop some good coping strategies it's not too bad! I know what you mean though, and I (as well as most people who live in London) actively avoid the busy spots at all costs.
Yep, SOAS has really great ties with SNU as one of our Korean lecturers and the current convenor for the year abroad graduated from there and has done a lot of research in partnership with its professors. I'm at SNU at the moment and whenever you mention you're from SOAS they're very impressed and always ask about our professors!
Also if you're looking for an opinion from the perspective of a Sheffield student then maybe send a message to mollypew, she's a current Korean student there
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askingforafrien
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(Original post by umbrellala)
Honestly I did struggle with the lack of greenery in London at the start which sounds weird but I realised that living in the 'concrete jungle' for so long and always being around busy-ness and rushing people made me quite anxious. I ended up changing the route I walked to uni so I could go through a park and see dogs running around every morning and it helped so much haha I think as long as you develop some good coping strategies it's not too bad! I know what you mean though, and I (as well as most people who live in London) actively avoid the busy spots at all costs.
Yep, SOAS has really great ties with SNU as one of our Korean lecturers and the current convenor for the year abroad graduated from there and has done a lot of research in partnership with its professors. I'm at SNU at the moment and whenever you mention you're from SOAS they're very impressed and always ask about our professors!
Also if you're looking for an opinion from the perspective of a Sheffield student then maybe send a message to mollypew, she's a current Korean student there
I am sending you a massive virtual hug for your help <3 I will definitely contact the student from Sheffield. Thank you so much.
Last question- would you say SOAS is more respected/ well-known in Korea than Sheffield is?
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umbrellala
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
I am sending you a massive virtual hug for your help <3 I will definitely contact the student from Sheffield. Thank you so much.
Last question- would you say SOAS is more respected/ well-known in Korea than Sheffield is?
No problem! This is an excerpt from my thread about the year abroad addressing SOAS v Sheffield at Korean unis:

"On the last Sunday before semester started I met up with one of my good friends from SOAS who goes to Korea University and had a good catch-up... There are quite a few Sheffield students at KU so it was interesting talking about the difference too. Most Korean students in the UK have heard the rumour that Sheffield students are not as well treated as SOAS students, but I was surprised when she said it was true. Well, not that Sheffield students are badly treated but just that SOAS students are preferred over others. The Korean teachers’ reactions when a student says they’re from SOAS vs Sheffield are supposedly quite different. I’ve also noticed that SNU professors are impressed when I say I go to SOAS, and I think that’s because SOAS professors have done a lot of well-regarded research at SNU and KU so they have really strong connections here. Almost every Korean professor I’ve spoken to knows Yeon Seonsaengnim [SOAS professor and year abroad convenor] by name. She also told me that all but one Sheffield student was put in level 1 after the placement test [taken at the start of the year abroad] so their teachers had to ask the university to move them which is a little confusing because I’d heard Sheffield’s speaking teaching was good… All in all it was a little sad to hear how Sheffield students aren’t as appreciated as SOAS students but it did confirm a lot of rumours I’d heard. It seems reputation really is everything here unfortunately."
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umbrellala
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(Original post by umbrellala)
No problem! This is an excerpt from my thread about the year abroad addressing SOAS v Sheffield at Korean unis:

"On the last Sunday before semester started I met up with one of my good friends from SOAS who goes to Korea University and had a good catch-up... There are quite a few Sheffield students at KU so it was interesting talking about the difference too. Most Korean students in the UK have heard the rumour that Sheffield students are not as well treated as SOAS students, but I was surprised when she said it was true. Well, not that Sheffield students are badly treated but just that SOAS students are preferred over others. The Korean teachers’ reactions when a student says they’re from SOAS vs Sheffield are supposedly quite different. I’ve also noticed that SNU professors are impressed when I say I go to SOAS, and I think that’s because SOAS professors have done a lot of well-regarded research at SNU and KU so they have really strong connections here. Almost every Korean professor I’ve spoken to knows Yeon Seonsaengnim [SOAS professor and year abroad convenor] by name. She also told me that all but one Sheffield student was put in level 1 after the placement test [taken at the start of the year abroad] so their teachers had to ask the university to move them which is a little confusing because I’d heard Sheffield’s speaking teaching was good… All in all it was a little sad to hear how Sheffield students aren’t as appreciated as SOAS students but it did confirm a lot of rumours I’d heard. It seems reputation really is everything here unfortunately."
Just to add to that, I realise it sounds quite dramatic. I wouldn't let it put you off too much in terms of how much it'll impact your year abroad. Ultimately those students went into the level they needed and I assume they've passed the level required and will continue as usual. At the end of the day it's only a minimal difference, but I'm not sure how those differences would play out in the workplace so that might be something to think about
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askingforafrien
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(Original post by umbrellala)
Just to add to that, I realise it sounds quite dramatic. I wouldn't let it put you off too much in terms of how much it'll impact your year abroad. Ultimately those students went into the level they needed and I assume they've passed the level required and will continue as usual. At the end of the day it's only a minimal difference, but I'm not sure how those differences would play out in the workplace so that might be something to think about
Yes, of course, I understand. That has given me a lot to think about though. I always assumed that Sheffield students would be preferred because it is a Russel Group uni. I have discussed all of the information you gave me with my mum and it has given us a lot of food for thought. She is quite worried about the financial aspect as coming from a family that is neither rich or poor, we feel that it may be a little difficult to afford life in London (we live in Cambridgeshire which I think is relatively cheap or at least cheaper than London). It will be especially hard on year 3 and 4 when not living in uni provided accommodation. (Because I presume that during the year abroad the accommodation will be the uni provided one right? of course, I know you still pay for it but it will be cheaper than independent accommodation)
I was also a little worried about the sense of community because although I'm not one to get all soft about friends, I feel like uni is quite a sensitive time when you just don't really want to feel alone or left out. I have just had a look at the societies on the student union website and they seem alright. I am especially interested in the Polish community as although I have been an immigrant for almost my entire life, I have grown up in a city HEAVILY populated in Polish people so this aspect is quite important for me for the first few independent years if my life.
I will speak to the other girl you linked me with and try to get just as educated on both unis to get a good grasp and try to come to a fair decision.
Once again, you have been incredibly helpful and I'm wishing you nothing but success and happiness.
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artful_lounger
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Is there any point in studying anything at university?

If you have a genuine and sustained interest in the subject material, then it's a worthwhile endeavour, be it in Korean or anything else. Any degree will broadly provide a similar set of transferable skills and be potentially as employable as any other - which is to say, not enormously. Degrees for job hunting are just a tick box exercise; if you have one at the right classification level, your application will move on to be assessed further. If not, it gets stopped then and there. What matters for finding a job as a graduate is what, if any, relevant work experience you have undertaken, and how well you can express the transferable skills you gained from your degree and how your work experiences will be an asset to a potential employer, on your CV, covering letter, and in interview.

Degree subjects don't make you employable, work experience and what you do with it are what make you employable.

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unless you're studying medicine in which case congrats! You have a guaranteed job at the end of the degree if you pass everything...then you have another 5-10 years of training while you are working that job
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umbrellala
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(Original post by askingforafrien)
Yes, of course, I understand. That has given me a lot to think about though. I always assumed that Sheffield students would be preferred because it is a Russel Group uni. I have discussed all of the information you gave me with my mum and it has given us a lot of food for thought. She is quite worried about the financial aspect as coming from a family that is neither rich or poor, we feel that it may be a little difficult to afford life in London (we live in Cambridgeshire which I think is relatively cheap or at least cheaper than London). It will be especially hard on year 3 and 4 when not living in uni provided accommodation. (Because I presume that during the year abroad the accommodation will be the uni provided one right? of course, I know you still pay for it but it will be cheaper than independent accommodation)
I was also a little worried about the sense of community because although I'm not one to get all soft about friends, I feel like uni is quite a sensitive time when you just don't really want to feel alone or left out. I have just had a look at the societies on the student union website and they seem alright. I am especially interested in the Polish community as although I have been an immigrant for almost my entire life, I have grown up in a city HEAVILY populated in Polish people so this aspect is quite important for me for the first few independent years if my life.
I will speak to the other girl you linked me with and try to get just as educated on both unis to get a good grasp and try to come to a fair decision.
Once again, you have been incredibly helpful and I'm wishing you nothing but success and happiness.
Not a problem at all! I will just add that you can stay in uni accommodation for third and fourth year at SOAS (like most unis in London) which is what I plan to do for next year. And I'm sure you won't have any issues finding a Polish community in London, it's about as diverse as you can get To be totally honest I feel like my experience of first year friends-wise was a little different just because I reverted to my more introverted habits from when I was younger and didn't branch out until later in the year. I know plenty of people with big friendship groups so if you have the right attitude you should be fine friends-wise, and once I put the effort in towards the end of first year I was much happier. Especially if you involve yourself in societies (which I didn't) you certainly won't feel left out
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