SR09876
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Hey! I’m stuck between economics and business. I’m not the best at maths and I don’t really enjoy it. I feel like business however seems less interesting. I have chose economics however I’m still open to changing it if need be. If I chose economics and kept it and enjoyed it , will it be useless if I can’t take it as a degree since most unis look for maths a level( which I haven’t taken) with an economics degree? Any advice? Thanks
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chrismanning0711
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(Original post by SR09876)
Hey! I’m stuck between economics and business. I’m not the best at maths and I don’t really enjoy it. I feel like business however seems less interesting. I have chose economics however I’m still open to changing it if need be. Any advice? Thanks
Didn't do a level economics but did do GCSE, I really liked economics and at GCSE there was very little/no maths involved at all, I doubt there would be much at all at a level. The import thing with economics is to be able to read graphs well.
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Quick-use
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(Original post by SR09876)
Hey! I’m stuck between economics and business. I’m not the best at maths and I don’t really enjoy it. I feel like business however seems less interesting. I have chose economics however I’m still open to changing it if need be. If I chose economics and kept it and enjoyed it , will it be useless if I can’t take it as a degree since most unis look for maths a level with an economics degree? Any advice? Thanks
At its heart, Economics is a social science. If you find it interesting, go for it. I ended up studying some economics during my studies of Japanese/Chinese modern history. I even studied it during a course in American Victorian society (which was taught in Japanese)... :lol: Of course, in my instance, we never looked at the mathematical side of economics; but, rather, the socio-economic aspects.

Regarding Econ at degree level, most universities don't actually require A levels Maths; it's only universities like Oxbridge, Warwick and LSE etc. Dozens of other universities, including several prestigious ones, don't require a background in maths either. They'll happily teach you the maths that you need to know in your 1st year of university. :rambo:
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SR09876
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(Original post by chrismanning0711)
Didn't do a level economics but did do GCSE, I really liked economics and at GCSE there was very little/no maths involved at all, I doubt there would be much at all at a level. The import thing with economics is to be able to read graphs well.
Ok thank you so much!
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SR09876
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(Original post by Quick-use)
At its heart, Economics is a social science. If you find it interesting, go for it. I ended up studying some economics during my studies of Japanese/Chinese modern history. I even studied it during a course in American Victorian society (which was taught in Japanese)... :lol: Of course, in my instance, we never looked at the mathematical side of economics; but, rather, the socio-economic aspects.

Regarding Econ at degree level, most universities don't actually require A levels Maths; it's only universities like Oxbridge, Warwick and LSE etc. Dozens of other universities, including several prestigious ones, don't require a background in maths either. They'll happily teach you the maths that you need to know in your 1st year of university. :rambo:
Ok thank you so much! I appreciate it
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TheCapstan
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Do you want to do Economics at uni? If so you need maths. But other than that economics > business because the topics are just way more interesting
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SR09876
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(Original post by TheCapstan)
Do you want to do Economics at uni? If so you need maths. But other than that economics > business because the topics are just way more interesting
I don’t know yet. I didn’t take a level maths. However someone replied saying some unis don’t require a level maths so if I wanted to take economics at uni, it wouldn’t be a problem? Thanks for the reply!
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Zoqua
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(Original post by SR09876)
Hey! I’m stuck between economics and business. I’m not the best at maths and I don’t really enjoy it. I feel like business however seems less interesting. I have chose economics however I’m still open to changing it if need be. If I chose economics and kept it and enjoyed it , will it be useless if I can’t take it as a degree since most unis look for maths a level( which I haven’t taken) with an economics degree? Any advice? Thanks
I came at economics from a very maths based perspective (my dream was to do maths at Cambridge before I decided I wanted to do economics), and I take Maths and Further Maths as part of my A levels (my others are Physics and Economics), so do bear in mind my advice might be biased especially when regarding the maths aspect. I don't take A level Business, but I've generally got the impression that economics is a more reputable and difficult subject. I haven't studied business, so I cannot tell you whether this is true or not, however what I have heard from friends who take business and from careers advisors, is that business is generally viewed as a softer option. What I do know with certainty from looking at the A level Business specifications is that the mathematical component of business is significantly less rigorous, which does appear to suit your needs. However if you like economics go for it!

(Original post by Quick-use)
At its heart, Economics is a social science. If you find it interesting, go for it. I ended up studying some economics during my studies of Japanese/Chinese modern history. I even studied it during a course in American Victorian society (which was taught in Japanese)... :lol: Of course, in my instance, we never looked at the mathematical side of economics; but, rather, the socio-economic aspects.

Regarding Econ at degree level, most universities don't actually require A levels Maths; it's only universities like Oxbridge, Warwick and LSE etc. Dozens of other universities, including several prestigious ones, don't require a background in maths either. They'll happily teach you the maths that you need to know in your 1st year of university. :rambo:
I disagree with the section in bold. The majority of the universities that are worth going to for economics in terms having a competitive degree and strong career prospects do either require A level Maths, or favor applicants with A level Maths. To prove I'm not just advocating as someone who likes maths, I've made a small list of some (bear in mind this is not all) reputable universities that require economics;
-Cambridge (Maths required, Further Maths recommended)
-LSE (Maths required, Further Maths recommended)
-Oxford (Maths required)
-UCL (Maths required)
-Warwick (Maths required)
-Nottingham (Maths preferred)
-Durham (Maths required)
-York (Maths required)
-Bath (Maths required)
-Exeter (Maths required)
Notably there are some exceptions to this rule, with Nottingham only preferring applicants with maths but not having it as a requirement (I know someone who currently takes Economics at Nottingham but isn't particularly mathematical so there is hope). Also bear in mind that the many different types of economics degrees have different requirements. Almost all of the degrees I mentioned about are BScs, which usually require Maths, so I'd lookout for BA Economics if I were you. I do agree that most places will do a recap of the maths that you need to know in the first year, but I'm guessing that more picking out the parts from A level/GCSE Maths that you actually need. Here's an article talking about this very topic: https://www.superprof.co.uk/blog/eco...without-maths/. I'm not saying that you can't do economics or have a good career in it without maths, as discussed at the end of the article, it's just that if you want to do a pure economics degree then you will often need maths.

Furthermore it depends on what you want to do with economics - if you want to go do something very quantitative like being an economist, financial analytics, investment analytics, accounting or statistics then you will certainly want a BSc (which will most likely require A level Maths) whereas there are many careers that you can go into with economics that won't require too much maths and so won't mind a BA. Sorry this is so long, but your post combined the three things I'm passionate about; maths, economics and careers. Whatever you decide good luck

Quick-use how did you find studying economics as part of history? That sounds like a pretty interesting way to pick it up.
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physicsamor
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As has been said you don't need a level maths depending on where you wish to go, look at entry requirements for a few unis if you want to. I liked economics at a-level and now tomorrow makes my final exam until I graduate with a degree in it. I did do a - level maths but xyz circumstances meant I only got a C so I didn't get into my first choice who wanted a B> in maths. However, maths in a level economics easy and simple just percentages etc data analysis briefly. Most universities will teach the maths from scratch and i actually found maths to be one of the easiest things of my degree because the teaching style was far more enlightening than in school. Students without maths background did struggle but the lecturers are usually more than willing to help you learn if you put In the effort to do the work. Students without maths background have sometimes even done better than students with. I'm of course bias but it's up to you.
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SR09876
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(Original post by Zoqua)
I came at economics from a very maths based perspective (my dream was to do maths at Cambridge before I decided I wanted to do economics), and I take Maths and Further Maths as part of my A levels (my others are Physics and Economics), so do bear in mind my advice might be biased especially when regarding the maths aspect. I don't take A level Business, but I've generally got the impression that economics is a more reputable and difficult subject. I haven't studied business, so I cannot tell you whether this is true or not, however what I have heard from friends who take business and from careers advisors, is that business is generally viewed as a softer option. What I do know with certainty from looking at the A level Business specifications is that the mathematical component of business is significantly less rigorous, which does appear to suit your needs. However if you like economics go for it!



I disagree with the section in bold. The majority of the universities that are worth going to for economics in terms having a competitive degree and strong career prospects do either require A level Maths, or favor applicants with A level Maths. To prove I'm not just advocating as someone who likes maths, I've made a small list of some (bear in mind this is not all) reputable universities that require economics;
-Cambridge (Maths required, Further Maths recommended)
-LSE (Maths required, Further Maths recommended)
-Oxford (Maths required)
-UCL (Maths required)
-Warwick (Maths required)
-Nottingham (Maths preferred)
-Durham (Maths required)
-York (Maths required)
-Bath (Maths required)
-Exeter (Maths required)
Notably there are some exceptions to this rule, with Nottingham only preferring applicants with maths but not having it as a requirement (I know someone who currently takes Economics at Nottingham but isn't particularly mathematical so there is hope). Also bear in mind that the many different types of economics degrees have different requirements. Almost all of the degrees I mentioned about are BScs, which usually require Maths, so I'd lookout for BA Economics if I were you. I do agree that most places will do a recap of the maths that you need to know in the first year, but I'm guessing that more picking out the parts from A level/GCSE Maths that you actually need. Here's an article talking about this very topic: https://www.superprof.co.uk/blog/eco...without-maths/. I'm not saying that you can't do economics or have a good career in it without maths, as discussed at the end of the article, it's just that if you want to do a pure economics degree then you will often need maths.

Furthermore it depends on what you want to do with economics - if you want to go do something very quantitative like being an economist, financial analytics, investment analytics, accounting or statistics then you will certainly want a BSc (which will most likely require A level Maths) whereas there are many careers that you can go into with economics that won't require too much maths and so won't mind a BA. Sorry this is so long, but your post combined the three things I'm passionate about; maths, economics and careers. Whatever you decide good luck

Quick-use how did you find studying economics as part of history? That sounds like a pretty interesting way to pick it up.
Wow thank you so much!! I didn’t know about any of this so thank you for the info😊 could I do a degree in business with a level economics or would a business a level be better for a business degree? Is economics a level useless if I can’t do it as a degree?
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SR09876
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(Original post by physicsamor)
As has been said you don't need a level maths depending on where you wish to go, look at entry requirements for a few unis if you want to. I liked economics at a-level and now tomorrow makes my final exam until I graduate with a degree in it. I did do a - level maths but xyz circumstances meant I only got a C so I didn't get into my first choice who wanted a B> in maths. However, maths in a level economics easy and simple just percentages etc data analysis briefly. Most universities will teach the maths from scratch and i actually found maths to be one of the easiest things of my degree because the teaching style was far more enlightening than in school. Students without maths background did struggle but the lecturers are usually more than willing to help you learn if you put In the effort to do the work. Students without maths background have sometimes even done better than students with. I'm of course bias but it's up to you.
Ok thank you so much!!😊
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Zoqua
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(Original post by SR09876)
Wow thank you so much!! I didn’t know about any of this so thank you for the info😊 could I do a degree in business with a level economics or would a business a level be better for a business degree? Is economics a level useless if I can’t do it as a degree?
No. Economics A level is far from useless (although I may be slightly biased as someone who takes it). You would be in a better position for business with A level Economics than A level Business actually, although I'm sure either would work. Good luck
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SR09876
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(Original post by Zoqua)
No. Economics A level is far from useless (although I may be slightly biased as someone who takes it). You would be in a better position for business with A level Economics than A level Business actually, although I'm sure either would work. Good luck
Great to know! Thank you 😊
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Ahad67767
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(Original post by SR09876)
I don’t know yet. I didn’t take a level maths. However someone replied saying some unis don’t require a level maths so if I wanted to take economics at uni, it wouldn’t be a problem? Thanks for the reply!
Most UK Unis require maths Alevel...and UOL ones,Oxbridge but less rusell group ones but the thing is y do you wanna do pure economics...Do PPE or a combination of subjects like economics and business etc...US Unis none require maths Alevel for pure economics degree.
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