ddivya
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#1
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If I were to do a degree in Chemical engineering, would i be able to go into more science/lab based research later on?
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Smack
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(Original post by ddivya)
If I were to do a degree in Chemical engineering, would i be able to go into more science/lab based research later on?
Potentially yes, although keep in mind as it's an engineering degree it's going to be more geared towards getting you an engineering job, which will likely be office or site based, rather than in a laboratory.
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University of Bath
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(Original post by ddivya)
If I were to do a degree in Chemical engineering, would i be able to go into more science/lab based research later on?
Hi there - I am a 3rd year chemical engineering student at the University of Bath.

The answer to your question is yes! As another poster said, whilst an engineering degree is designed to set you up for an industrial career in engineering, you also develop a range of skills which are applicable to other sectors.

For example, during the MEng Chemical Engineering degree at Bath, there is an opportunity to undertake a research project in the lab. This lab based work provides an insight into a more scientific rather than engineering based approach, depending on the project you are undertaking. If you take a look at the research areas of the chemical engineering department's of the Universities you are interested in, you can see the areas covered are wide and there is a huge overlap between areas of science and engineering. For example, I have recently completed my research project in the design of drug delivery devices.

As an undergraduate, I am no expert in how you would pursue a career in research. However, from my understanding, the best route in would be by doing a PhD. PhD's, depending on your project area, can be more lab and science based compared to the engineering in your degree, with an emphasis on designing a technology for scale up. This is something I am considering as I really enjoyed the research aspect of my project, so rest assurred it is definitely a pathway if you choose to follow it.

One thing I would say is that if you are really interested in science and research, I would have a detailed look at the modules in a chemical engineering degree compared to a science degree. Not a lot of pure science is taught as the emphasis is on the application of science to often large scale, engineeringconcepts. If you have your heart set on research / science, an engineering degree may not be the best route.

If you have any questions do let me know

Leah
3rd Year Chemical Engineering
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ddivya
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#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there - I am a 3rd year chemical engineering student at the University of Bath.

The answer to your question is yes! As another poster said, whilst an engineering degree is designed to set you up for an industrial career in engineering, you also develop a range of skills which are applicable to other sectors.

For example, during the MEng Chemical Engineering degree at Bath, there is an opportunity to undertake a research project in the lab. This lab based work provides an insight into a more scientific rather than engineering based approach, depending on the project you are undertaking. If you take a look at the research areas of the chemical engineering department's of the Universities you are interested in, you can see the areas covered are wide and there is a huge overlap between areas of science and engineering. For example, I have recently completed my research project in the design of drug delivery devices.

As an undergraduate, I am no expert in how you would pursue a career in research. However, from my understanding, the best route in would be by doing a PhD. PhD's, depending on your project area, can be more lab and science based compared to the engineering in your degree, with an emphasis on designing a technology for scale up. This is something I am considering as I really enjoyed the research aspect of my project, so rest assurred it is definitely a pathway if you choose to follow it.

One thing I would say is that if you are really interested in science and research, I would have a detailed look at the modules in a chemical engineering degree compared to a science degree. Not a lot of pure science is taught as the emphasis is on the application of science to often large scale, engineeringconcepts. If you have your heart set on research / science, an engineering degree may not be the best route.

If you have any questions do let me know

Leah
3rd Year Chemical Engineering
sorry for the late reply, but thank you so much! im definitely set on doing science/ science based research etc as an end goal but decided to do it via a chem eng degree, just in case i change my mind and go into the industry.
im about to start my chem eng degree this september and i hope u dont mind if i ask a few questions. since im free now, is there anything i can study prior to my degree? or anything i can self learn or prepare ahead of time? some maths or courses i can cover on my own, stuff like that so the load is a bit light when i start. also any advice or info u hv to offer abt chem eng would be very valuable.
thanks again.
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Justageezer
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#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by ddivya)
sorry for the late reply, but thank you so much! im definitely set on doing science/ science based research etc as an end goal but decided to do it via a chem eng degree, just in case i change my mind and go into the industry.
im about to start my chem eng degree this september and i hope u dont mind if i ask a few questions. since im free now, is there anything i can study prior to my degree? or anything i can self learn or prepare ahead of time? some maths or courses i can cover on my own, stuff like that so the load is a bit light when i start. also any advice or info u hv to offer abt chem eng would be very valuable.
thanks again.
I wouldn't bother doing anything prior to the degree. After the first week everything is new and first year is basically to put everyone on the same level. Enjoy your first year, live the life and don't bother about putting so much work in, you'll be doing that for the other years. First year grades don't count towards your degree. I got a 2:2 in first year but I'm now graduating with a first so don't get to drawn up with that.

If you want to get a head start definitely look at mass and energy balances because these are used so much and can be confusing when first looking at them. One this to point out is the chemistry on the course is way easier than alevel and most of what you'll be taught on chemistry is alevel standard.
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ddivya
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#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by Justageezer)
I wouldn't bother doing anything prior to the degree. After the first week everything is new and first year is basically to put everyone on the same level. Enjoy your first year, live the life and don't bother about putting so much work in, you'll be doing that for the other years. First year grades don't count towards your degree. I got a 2:2 in first year but I'm now graduating with a first so don't get to drawn up with that.

If you want to get a head start definitely look at mass and energy balances because these are used so much and can be confusing when first looking at them. One this to point out is the chemistry on the course is way easier than alevel and most of what you'll be taught on chemistry is alevel standard.
thank you! ill check that out
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University of Bath
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#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by ddivya)
sorry for the late reply, but thank you so much! im definitely set on doing science/ science based research etc as an end goal but decided to do it via a chem eng degree, just in case i change my mind and go into the industry.
im about to start my chem eng degree this september and i hope u dont mind if i ask a few questions. since im free now, is there anything i can study prior to my degree? or anything i can self learn or prepare ahead of time? some maths or courses i can cover on my own, stuff like that so the load is a bit light when i start. also any advice or info u hv to offer abt chem eng would be very valuable.
thanks again.
Hi there! Congrats for getting offers for chem eng in September

As someone else said, I wouldn't worry about doing any studying before you come to uni (I sure didn't!). Mass and energy balances form the basic principles of chemcial engineering and it can be a little confusing in the first year so that could be useful, but it will be taught from scratch so try not to worry

Everything will be taught with the aim to get everyone up to the same speed. Science and maths principles you've learnt in school will covered again. If you have not done further maths A-level or equivalent in school, looking over some maths principles can be useful. Most importantly for engineering is calculus, differential equations (first order, second order and importantly numerical methods used to solve them comes up A LOT), matrices and imaginary numbers. Having a good grasp on these topics will make the application to engineering much easier. A good grasp of mechanics from either maths or physics modules is also very useful (force balances etc.)

Try not to worry about it too much! Good luck

Leah
3rd Year Chemical Engineering
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