Why are there so many parents on here now?

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Emmerage
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I've just come back to this forum after awhile away (lost my old account info), and have noticed that there are a LOT of posts from parents of students. What gives? I thought this was the STUDENT room?

But seriously, why are there so many parents on here? Shouldn't students sort their own stuff out - otherwise how will they get through uni on their own? I've heard of some parents even contacting universities about their kid's grades... just seems weird.

So, parents who are on here - one question, why?
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justcallmejess1
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Probably just lowkey stalking their kids :biggrin:
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1secondsofvamps
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(Original post by justcallmejess1)
Probably just lowkey stalking their kids :biggrin:
The scary thing is that my mum actually did that with one of my social media accounts
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username5258262
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(Original post by 1secondsofvamps)
The scary thing is that my mum actually did that with one of my social media accounts
my mum has tsr :zomg:
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999tigger
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(Original post by Emmerage)
I've just come back to this forum after awhile away (lost my old account info), and have noticed that there are a LOT of posts from parents of students. What gives? I thought this was the STUDENT room?

But seriously, why are there so many parents on here? Shouldn't students sort their own stuff out - otherwise how will they get through uni on their own? I've heard of some parents even contacting universities about their kid's grades... just seems weird.

So, parents who are on here - one question, why?
Who were you before?
Perhaps they post here for advice or to give it?
I fear if only the students were left to answer their own issues, then many questions would go unanswered or be answered poorly.
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justcallmejess1
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(Original post by 1secondsofvamps)
The scary thing is that my mum actually did that with one of my social media accounts
Did you confront her about it?
:lol:
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stereotypeasian
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my parents don't have a TSR account but they do look on here for answers
Spoiler:
Show
they also don't know I have an account lol......
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ROTL94
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It's also entirely feasible they didn't have children when they first registered for an account, but now have kids
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1secondsofvamps
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(Original post by justcallmejess1)
Did you confront her about it?
:lol:
We both knew.

I deleted that account now, made a new one and put it on private
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Emmerage)
I've just come back to this forum after awhile away (lost my old account info), and have noticed that there are a LOT of posts from parents of students. What gives? I thought this was the STUDENT room?

But seriously, why are there so many parents on here? Shouldn't students sort their own stuff out - otherwise how will they get through uni on their own? I've heard of some parents even contacting universities about their kid's grades... just seems weird.

So, parents who are on here - one question, why?
I agree that there are lot of parents now, and some of them are a bit pushy, to be honest. The sharp-elbowed mums and dads who are looking for that 'secret' to push their child to the front of the queue, usually surrounding Oxbridge, law or medicine. They're not terribly welcome, to be honest, and are a bit toxic. The sort of parent who tries to come into their child's Oxbridge interview and talk for them...

However, there's also lots of parents confused by UCAS, Progress 8 and a whole host of terminology and acronyms who come to TSR to look for answers to help them understand the trials and tribulations their child is going through both at school and during applying to university. They're looking for support and guidance, so they can help their kid more, and some understanding of how other people (including other parents) are navigating it. This is all the more important since the schools have been closed. This is a good thing - and TSR is big enough to accommodate them with open arms.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I agree that there are lot of parents now, and some of them are a bit pushy, to be honest. The sharp-elbowed mums and dads who are looking for that 'secret' to push their child to the front of the queue, usually surrounding Oxbridge, law or medicine. They're not terribly welcome, to be honest, and are a bit toxic. The sort of parent who tries to come into their child's Oxbridge interview and talk for them...

However, there's also lots of parents confused by UCAS, Progress 8 and a whole host of terminology and acronyms who come to TSR to look for answers to help them understand the trials and tribulations their child is going through both at school and during applying to university. They're looking for support and guidance, so they can help their kid more, and some understanding of how other people (including other parents) are navigating it. This is all the more important since the schools have been closed. This is a good thing - and TSR is big enough to accommodate them with open arms.
Either that or they want to bang their kids and know if it's ok
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CaramelCamel
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I know right I'm fairly sure my parents have never heard of TSR. I suppose it's mostly just parents concerned about their child's education but it does seem like they can be quite pushy (generalising here). Personally, I find it unusual that a parent would be so involved in their child's education post-16 when the importance of independence is stressed at this stage. This might just be a culture shock though as maybe it's normal for people from different social classes or areas or backgrounds to me. It might be different if they're paying for the child's education and they feel like they should therefore have a greater role and get their money's worth. That's still no excuse for putting too much pressure on their children (who are actually almost adults).
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harrysbar
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I'm a parent and originally came on TSR to give UCAS advice (I was a Higher Education careers adviser in my previous job and I guess I miss aspects of it) but now I not only give UCAS advice but also join in general chats as I find them enjoyable and interesting.

I don't spy on my kids as they don't use TSR. I think that overall it is a good thing when parents use their life experience to give advice (although some seek it of course) and that the community benefits from having a wider range of views and perspectives. The vast majority of TSR members are obviously students but there is also a place for older people too. Most older people and parents seem to be very popular on TSR (judging by their above average rep count) and that is because lots of community members are appreciating the advice they are giving whether it be UCAS, relationships or whatever. The pushy parents are less popular for obvious reasons but they tend not to post much anyway as they are only seeking answers to specific questions to help their own children.
Last edited by harrysbar; 1 year ago
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Catherine1973
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Not a parent but a mature student. So I can post on lots of threads in say relationship advice or how to buy houses or just lend a sympathetic ear to a poster who seems lost at university and not sure what to do. Or a pregnancy worry.
Just trying to be a helpful member really.
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Admit-One
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Honestly I think it's just the fact this is going to be the most unusual admissions cycle in living memory. Everyone is confused and looking for guidance and info. Students can be vague when passing stuff on, so parents often like to hear things directly, especially given that most admissions phonelines are currently closed.

Working in UG admissions it is really not unusual at all to receive calls from parents on behalf of applicants.

I was always more alarmed when I received calls from the parents of postgraduate applicants...
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Admit-One)
Honestly I think it's just the fact this is going to be the most unusual admissions cycle in living memory. Everyone is confused and looking for guidance and info. Students can be vague when passing stuff on, so parents often like to hear things directly, especially given that most admissions phonelines are currently closed.

Working in UG admissions it is really not unusual at all to receive calls from parents on behalf of applicants.

I was always more alarmed when I received calls from the parents of postgraduate applicants...
Haha that alarming.... my son’s so vague about everything I can understand parents going straight to the Unis for general admissions info though
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girl_in_black
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Hovercraft parents
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Admit-One)
I was always more alarmed when I received calls from the parents of postgraduate applicants...
My supervisor used to tell me that they not uncommonly had the parents of postgraduate students attempting to come into departmental interviews to 'support' their child. All except it wasn't a child at all!

Terrifying, isn't it?
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