G protein coupled receptor

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Josive
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How does the GPCR Bind extracellular stimulus to itself
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bits.of.bio
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GPCR's have 7 sections that go in and out of the cell membrane (transmembrane), stimuli which are specific for that GPCR will be able to bind because their structure matches that of the GPCR and they can fit together to bind. This triggers a conformational change in the GPCR allowing it to interact with a G protein on the intracellular side of the membrane. This begins a signalling cascade
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Josive)
How does the GPCR Bind extracellular stimulus to itself
You really need to have a look at a diagram of this.
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HarisMalik98
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The non-active conformation is the GDP-bound G-protein associated with the GPCR. The GDP is bound to the G-Protein alpha-subunit.

Binding of a ligand causes a conformational change in the GPCR - a.k.a the signal is transduced through the membrane.

The conformational change activates the G-protein.

The activates G-protein acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), exchanging GDP for GTP on the alpha-subunit.

The alpha-subunit-GTP complex dissociates from the GPCR and propagates downstream signals.

G-Proteins have intrinsic GTP→GDP hydrolysis capability, so the signal eventually gets terminated naturally.
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Josive
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(Original post by bits.of.bio)
GPCR's have 7 sections that go in and out of the cell membrane (transmembrane), stimuli which are specific for that GPCR will be able to bind because their structure matches that of the GPCR and they can fit together to bind. This triggers a conformational change in the GPCR allowing it to interact with a G protein on the intracellular side of the membrane. This begins a signalling cascade
Wow cheers! You explained it way more clearly than alot of books I've read!
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