are clinical psycologists not really in demand?

Watch this thread
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
like I know that nurses these days and have always been in demand and therefore there are lots of jobs available but is it like that with clinical psychologists too, because I want to go into this but im scared that after I have done soo much education and degrees later , it will be hard to find a job. and also are these jobs really competitive
0
reply
moso2203
Badges: 17
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
quoting from the clinical psychology workforce report 2015: https://www.bps.org.uk/sites/www.bps...%282015%29.pdf

A recent collaborative piece of work between the Information Services Division (ISD) of
NHS National Services Scotland (NSS) and NHS Education for Scotland (NES)32 noted
"recent years have seen an unparalleled demand for increased access to Applied
Psychologists and Psychological Therapies. A demand from both patients and
professionals has arisen due to the ever increasing evidence base for psychological
interventions".


Neuropsychology services linked to the assessment and neuro-rehabilitation are areas

of growth in demand for clinical psychologists.

In addition to more traditional roles for psychologists in Child and Adolescent Mental
Health Services, there are increasing opportunities in child physical health, special
needs children and neuropsychology services and a growth in demand for clinical
psychologists is noted in these areas


There has been a steady growth in demand for psychologists to work in forensic
settings including low, medium and high secure mental health services but also within
prisons and community criminal justice services such as liaison and diversion
services41



If you're interested in educational psychology - like me - then it is also in demand according to this report from 2016 https://assets.publishing.service.go...nts_report.pdf
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
A lot of people are doing psychology at uni recently so honestly not sure. It can open different prospects though in future.
0
reply
Anonymous #3
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
Just offering a different perspective:
Both my parents are clinical psychologists. They both worked for the NHS for most of their careers and turned private when they were older (my dad to cut down time travelling and my mum spent a year our caring for my ill sister and just wanted a change after that).
My dad recently retired and still gets calls asking for him to take on patients.
My mum also sees quite a lot of patients, she had to build up good relationships with insurance companies who pay for treatment for people with private health insurance, and also had to build relationships with GP's.
She also tops up her work by taking on legal clients. This work isn't for everyone, she sometimes has to assess people in prison, or speak to people who are being threatened with having their children removed from their care.
She also works very long hours - like she starts at around 5.30am writing court reports and sometimes will see patients at our house until 8pm (but I think earns decently from it).
So I think it is an industry that relies on how you get good contacts, you have to do good work for a solicitor and then they want you to do another report for them etc.
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
My impression was that while there is a demand for it, the qualification/training process is very long, remuneration somewhat average by comparison to other professions with similar training periods, and I believe spaces are limited on the DClinPsy courses, so there is something of a (possibly artificial, although I imagine it's due to limitations in provision of clinical experiences) bottleneck there. Also I would not be surprised if the areas with highest demand are in regions people would consider less desirable to live and work in (i.e. not the south, not London, smaller regional cities rather than major metropolitan cities, etc).

Noodlzzz might be able to offer some more advice - although not in clinical psychology, they are in academic psychology and might know some clinicians?
Last edited by artful_lounger; 2 years ago
0
reply
Anonymous #4
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
Clinical psychologists are very much in demand.
FUNDING for DClinPsy places to enable them to get their doctorate and become fully fledged clin psychs are not.
You'd think there will be a big push for mental health relating to COVID and I reckon there will, but it will be in social work and IAPT services (i.e. low intensity PWPs/HI Trainees). There won't be a push for more funded places on BPS accredited courses because universities are going to get shafted as it is.

Look into Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner, you do a PGDip rather than a DClin and can progress to a High Intensity diploma after two years. The money is on par if not above what newly graduated clin psychs make.
0
reply
Noodlzzz
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Anonymous)
like I know that nurses these days and have always been in demand and therefore there are lots of jobs available but is it like that with clinical psychologists too, because I want to go into this but im scared that after I have done soo much education and degrees later , it will be hard to find a job. and also are these jobs really competitive
(Original post by artful_lounger)
My impression was that while there is a demand for it, the qualification/training process is very long, remuneration somewhat average by comparison to other professions with similar training periods, and spaces are limited on the DClinPsy courses, so there is something of an artificial bottleneck there. Also I would not be surprised if the areas with highest demand are in regions people would consider less desirable to live and work in (i.e. not the south, not London, smaller regional cities rather than major metropolitan cities, etc).


Noodlzzz might be able to offer some more advice - although not in clinical psychology, they are in academic psychology and might know some clinicians?
Thanks for the tag artful_lounger (you can call me she btw ), most of my studies and career were dedicated to doing the DClinPsych so may be able to offer some advice:

There is some demand, but to get on to the graduate course is incredibly, incredibly hard. I think the stats is something like 12% acceptance rate - and many will have first class psych degrees and years of relevant and paid full-time work

What education do you have?
Last edited by Noodlzzz; 2 years ago
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Y13's - If you haven't confirmed your firm and insurance choices yet, why is that?

I am waiting until the deadline in case anything in my life changes (19)
21.11%
I am waiting until the deadline in case something else changes (e.g. exams/pandemic related concerns) (11)
12.22%
I am waiting until I can see the unis in person (5)
5.56%
I still have more questions before I make my decision (15)
16.67%
No reason, just haven't entered it yet (21)
23.33%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (19)
21.11%

Watched Threads

View All