Academically smart meaning

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anon5252
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#1
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How would you measure whether you are academically smart? Would you base it on your GCSE/A level/degree results or how much knowledge you have?
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Broque_
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Academically smart is also often what we call book smart. GCSEs and A levels would be an indication of that, however it is more generally someone who reflects the skills we use in general examinations of intelligence, things such as math reasoning, language, memorisation and presentation. Someone who thrives in academic settings, such as school would often be academically smart, however, while these people often also have reasonable intelligence, it's not set in stone. Academically smart is someone who is good at following the rules (whether they agree or not) and obtain most of their knowledge from studying or books, rather than practice. There is nothing wrong with being book smart or street smart, it's just that in school settings the former is preferred, and in practice and society the latter is just as valued or maybe even more useful.
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04MR17
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My question would be why would you need to measure how academically smart someone is?
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anon5252
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(Original post by 04MR17)
My question would be why would you need to measure how academically smart someone is?
I do not care to measure whether someone else is academically smart. I am interested in other people's views on this as intelligence is subjective. Also, I was trying to assess myself as a lot of people say that I am academically smart, but I do not believe that.
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04MR17
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(Original post by anon5252)
I do not care to measure whether someone else is academically smart. I am interested in other people's views on this as intelligence is subjective. Also, I was trying to assess myself as a lot of people say that I am academically smart, but I do not believe that.
I see, my view would be that intelligence is pertinent to its application. I don't quite go as far as Howard Gardner's multiple intelligence theory but I tend to not be a fan of the view that intelligence is this innate unitary phenomenon.
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_gcx
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I would say that you are "academically" smart in an academic subject if you can:

  • digest and understand new information in that subject well/quickly, see links and make generalisations
  • readily and creatively apply knowledge to new situations and problems
  • explain parts of the subject well - arguably if you struggle to explain something in your own words, your understanding is lacking.

I don't really believe that there's "street smarts" and "book smarts" - really they're just the same skills applied in different ways. I say "in an area" because people can have a knack for some things and not for others.

exams might not measure all of these. while someone smart will probably have high exam results - it can't be guaranteed that someone with a high grade has aptitude for the subject. they could've just got lucky, or the exam might have enabled them to just memorise information without having to understand it. (these exist throughout education) equally someone with lower results could have just had a bad day and might have a better understanding of the subject than the aforementioned student. if a-levels/GCSEs were infallible indicators of someone's academic ability - Oxbridge would just select the top x% of GCSE/A-level scores and be done with it rather than interviewing.

academically ability is something that can be hard to gauge on paper - but isn't too hard when you have a conversation with someone about their subject.
Last edited by _gcx; 2 years ago
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