Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi everybody,Once this situation blows over, I'll be entering my final year (:crossedf:)I haven't given much thought into what specialty route to go down during the first 4 years of medical school. However, I have gathered so much:I want to be a surgeon.
I want to make as much money as possible.
I want to have a good balance between time off work and earning.I spent some time in neurosurgery. I loved it but am really discouraged by the competitiveness just to get in, the extreme nature of their work, the high risk of litigation that comes with neurosurgery and the fact that a neurosurgeon has no choice but to work in a busy central hospital throughout their entire career and I'm not sure whether I'd like to be in a busy city into my 50s and 60s (neurosurgical centres are not placed in district hospitals).I don't know much about which specialties earn the most. I do however know that consultants in the NHS get paid the same across specialties, so I assume that in the UK the real difference in earnings amongst consultants comes down to work in the private sector.If anybody could spare a few minutes by shedding some light on this matter, that'd be great

Thanks.
0
reply
cwhite0949
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Hi everybody,


Once this situation blows over, I'll be entering my final year (Image)


I haven't given much thought into what specialty route to go down during the first 4 years of medical school. However, I have gathered so much:


I want to be a surgeon.
I want to make as much money as possible.
I want to have a good balance between time off work and earning.


I spent some time in neurosurgery. I loved it but am really discourage
d by the competitiveness just to get in, the extreme nature of their work, the high risk of litigation that comes with neurosurgery and the fact that a neurosurgeon has no choice but to work in a busy central hospital throughout their entire career and I'm not sure whether I'd like to be in a busy city into my 50s and 60s (neurosurgical centres are not placed in district hospitals).I don't know much about which specialties earn the most. I do however know that consultants in the NHS get paid the same across specialties, so I assume that in the UK the real difference in earnings amongst consultants comes down to work in the private sector.

If anybody could spare a few minutes by shedding some light on this matter, that'd be great

Thanks
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
A surgical field that pays well, offers good lifestyle and not competitive to get into does not exist.
3
reply
alice456
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
I guess it depends what you enjoy. From what I have seen working in the NHS ophthalmology seems to provide a reasonable work life balance as most of the work is based around outpatient clinics rather than ward based work. There is also some scope to provide private services such as laser eye surgery. Other specialities which are based around outpatient clinics could potentially be similar and provide scope to provide these clinics on a private basis. However any medical speciality has its challenges and doing something that does not interest you will make working in a tough job like medicine even tougher. I hope this helps.
0
reply
Anonymous #3
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
What surgical specialties provide a good work life balance?
0
reply
Nearlyamedic
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Don’t forget you don’t have to make your decision which speciality to choose as soon as you graduate. You still have a few placements ahead of you both in final year and foundation.

It might be a good idea to use your final year to try and spend some time in different specialities. Med schools sometimes allow small experiences in different specialties, if you haven’t already been exposed, you are keen and keeping up with course demands

Also it’s far better to enjoy your job rather than do it just for money, that just seems a sure fire path to burnout imo.
1
reply
Anonymous #4
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
Well based on your three criteria, plastics is the way to go. Plastic by name, plastic by nature.
0
reply
Es0phagus
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Anonymous)
What surgical specialties provide a good work life balance?
ENT isn't the worst from what I hear. Anecdotally, I've seen a few general surgeons retrain in ENT due to lower workload.
Last edited by Es0phagus; 1 year ago
0
reply
asif007
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
If you’re determined to do surgery then I suggest you consider other types of surgical specialty, not just Neurosurgery. Other surgeons won’t be confined to tertiary care centres and some specialties have better scope for private sector work than others. Plastics and orthopaedics have some of the best opportunities in this respect.

Having said that, there’s no such thing as a good work life balance in surgery. In fact it’s pretty well known for having a poor work life balance, at least more than other specialties. Run through and CST applications are very competitive and you’ll probably have to spend time out of training getting extra experience in surgery and/or doing a degree to make your application more competitive. On the job you can expect to do a lot of unsocial hours, night shifts, long days etc and maybe even having to come in on your days off to get more time in theatre. You’ll be spending 7-8 years post FY2 training towards a salary which is really good at face value, but IMO not worth all the years of training it takes to get there. Surely as someone who wants to make money, you should be looking at ways you can make the highest amount of money in the shortest possible time.

Hence why I always recommend GP to anyone in Medicine who’s looking to make money. It’s the shortest training pathway, after which you can earn only marginally less than a full time surgeon who also does private work, but in less than half the number of years it takes for surgery. Locum demand for GP’s is huge, rates are high all across the country whereas locum consultant roles in one particular specialty may be spread out fewer and further between, in less areas as hospitals cut back on locum spending. You also have LTFT work and freedom to choose your own hours in GP, giving you time to work on other money-making ventures, whereas you don’t get this in surgery until you’re already a consultant.

Best way to making good money is to diversify your streams of income. Businesses, properties and learning extra skills which you can then charge for, such as non-surgical cosmetic procedures. Surgery is too inflexible to allow you to work on other things outside the hospital which means you’re pretty much restricted to only earning an income from surgery, and trading time for money. That’s counter-productive long term and won’t help you maximise your earnings Something like GP or even another specialty with shorter hours and more flexibility like Dermatology: IMO these are well paid enough to make good capital for investments, but also allow you enough time off to go out and manage those investments. I would suggest you only become a surgeon if surgery is the only thing you can see yourself doing as a career. Many many better opportunities for making money are non-medical.
1
reply
Anonymous #5
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by asif007)
If you’re determined to do surgery then I suggest you consider other types of surgical specialty, not just Neurosurgery. Other surgeons won’t be confined to tertiary care centres and some specialties have better scope for private sector work than others. Plastics and orthopaedics have some of the best opportunities in this respect.

Having said that, there’s no such thing as a good work life balance in surgery. In fact it’s pretty well known for having a poor work life balance, at least more than other specialties. Run through and CST applications are very competitive and you’ll probably have to spend time out of training getting extra experience in surgery and/or doing a degree to make your application more competitive. On the job you can expect to do a lot of unsocial hours, night shifts, long days etc and maybe even having to come in on your days off to get more time in theatre. You’ll be spending 7-8 years post FY2 training towards a salary which is really good at face value, but IMO not worth all the years of training it takes to get there. Surely as someone who wants to make money, you should be looking at ways you can make the highest amount of money in the shortest possible time.

Hence why I always recommend GP to anyone in Medicine who’s looking to make money. It’s the shortest training pathway, after which you can earn only marginally less than a full time surgeon who also does private work, but in less than half the number of years it takes for surgery. Locum demand for GP’s is huge, rates are high all across the country whereas locum consultant roles in one particular specialty may be spread out fewer and further between, in less areas as hospitals cut back on locum spending. You also have LTFT work and freedom to choose your own hours in GP, giving you time to work on other money-making ventures, whereas you don’t get this in surgery until you’re already a consultant.

Best way to making good money is to diversify your streams of income. Businesses, properties and learning extra skills which you can then charge for, such as non-surgical cosmetic procedures. Surgery is too inflexible to allow you to work on other things outside the hospital which means you’re pretty much restricted to only earning an income from surgery, and trading time for money. That’s counter-productive long term and won’t help you maximise your earnings Something like GP or even another specialty with shorter hours and more flexibility like Dermatology: IMO these are well paid enough to make good capital for investments, but also allow you enough time off to go out and manage those investments. I would suggest you only become a surgeon if surgery is the only thing you can see yourself doing as a career. Many many better opportunities for making money are non-medical.
GP kind of sounds like an absolute dream! I don’t understand why it’s so undersubscribed.
0
reply
Anonymous #4
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Anonymous)
GP kind of sounds like an absolute dream! I don’t understand why it’s so undersubscribed.
It's just not what it used to be - being a partner in the past meant great security and high earnings. Many of those benefits have been eroded over time so that the effort is still the same, but the reward is lower. That said you can argue the same of most specialties. It's also an immensely stressful job contrary to the public opinion - on my previous placements I'd say the GPs are the busiest and most stressed on average. Rarely get a break, rarely get the resources needed to investigate patients properly etc.

Personally I think the pros outweigh the cons. I like that I could do GP work 4 days a week and then work in A&E for another day, and I could get paid more than a consultant in hospital to do that.
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by Anonymous)
GP kind of sounds like an absolute dream! I don’t understand why it’s so undersubscribed.
Its size mainly. GP gets by far the most applicants of any speciality, but that's still not enough.

Constant government bashing also really doesn't help.
0
reply
fishfacesimpson
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Anonymous)
It's just not what it used to be - being a partner in the past meant great security and high earnings. Many of those benefits have been eroded over time so that the effort is still the same, but the reward is lower. That said you can argue the same of most specialties. It's also an immensely stressful job contrary to the public opinion - on my previous placements I'd say the GPs are the busiest and most stressed on average. Rarely get a break, rarely get the resources needed to investigate patients properly etc.

Personally I think the pros outweigh the cons. I like that I could do GP work 4 days a week and then work in A&E for another day, and I could get paid more than a consultant in hospital to do that.
The latter is what all my gp friends mention. Not necessarily the money but the flexibility. The working days are undoubtedly intense but you can add in diversity and LTFT more easily into your job plan than most hospital jobs
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How would you feel if uni students needed to be double vaccinated to start in Autumn?

I'd feel reassured about my own health (33)
15%
I'd feel reassured my learning may be less disrupted by isolations/lockdowns (68)
30.91%
I'd feel less anxious about being around large groups (26)
11.82%
I don't mind if others are vaccinated or not (18)
8.18%
I'm concerned it may disadvantage some students (12)
5.45%
I think it's an unfair expectation (60)
27.27%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (3)
1.36%

Watched Threads

View All