LearudyBE
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what is an invitation to treat? In the simplest of terms
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Ashahwe7
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An ITT is an invitation for consumers to make an offer, but it is not in itself an offer. The seller is merely inviting offers and is therefore not bound in contract to sell. Seller at this point has the right to freely accept or decline offers at their own discretion. Whereas if a seller made an “offer” he would be bound in a contract to sell, as long as the buyer met the terms.
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LearudyBE
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Do you know any case law with that on the top of your head?

Because The case I can think of but Just having trouble understanding is Fisher v Bell 1961.

In the shop window, there was a flip knife with a price tag on it. A police offer saw the display and wanted to purchase the flip knife. To accept the contract.

In this case, is the knife being with the price tag the Invitation to treat?

are displays and adverts invitations to treat?
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ROTL94
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(Original post by albertft9)
Do you know any case law with that on the top of your head?

Because The case I can think of but Just having trouble understanding is Fisher v Bell 1961.

In the shop window, there was a flip knife with a price tag on it. A police offer saw the display and wanted to purchase the flip knife. To accept the contract.

In this case, is the knife being with the price tag the Invitation to treat?

are displays and adverts invitations to treat?
Generally the adverts are invitiations to treat Partridge v Crittenden, Lefkowitz v Great Minneapolis Surplus Store relate to adverts. Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain v Boots Cash Chemists relates to shop displays. There's a good bit of information about Fisher v. Bell on Lawteacher that explains it all
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LearudyBE
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You wouldn't happen to know any case law that can help discuss the key elements required to form a contract by chance?

Like legal offer and acceptance.
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ROTL94
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Did you not attend the lectures or tutorials?
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LearudyBE
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All our lectures on law started at the end of the year and surprise surprise COVID appears so really put a damper on learning materials
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ROTL94
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(Original post by albertft9)
All our lectures on law started at the end of the year and surprise surprise COVID appears so really put a damper on learning materials
Ok. Well to return to your original question. Carlill v Carbolic Smoke Ball Company, Harvey v Facey, Blue v Ashley, and MacInnes v Gross are the cases you'll need for formation of contract.
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