bunnieboo
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Just wondered if people who are studying/have studied either adult or mental health could post the positive &/or negative for each, what they learnt/studied & if they enjoyed it?.

Thank you
0
reply
Ashahwe7
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
It’s hard to give non-biased advice because it’s so dependent on what suits you more. The best way to find out what you should pursue is to get experience in each setting. Most unis send students to adult, children and mental health placements in their first year so that students know they’ve made the right choice before specialising in 2nd year.
0
reply
bunnieboo
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
Thanks for the reply, uni here you pick when you apply, so dont get that opportunity.
0
reply
moosec
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
Which field you choose will depend on what area you wish to specialise in / where you want to head in your career really.

MH Nurses will work in fields including Acute Care, Low/Medium/High Secure units, Psychiatric Intensive Care, Forensic Mental Health, CAMHS (Children & Adolescents MH), Substance Abuse, specialised units such as Personality Disorders or Eating Disorders, Perinatal MH, Community Outpatients, Older Adults Mental Health, Crisis Intervention & Home Treatment Teams, Community Psychiatric Nursing etc etc.

Adult Nurses will work in fields including GP Practices, Community Nursing, Theatre/Scrubs Nursing, Emergency Department, Trauma & Orthopaedics, Women's Health/Gynaecology, Intensive Care, Coronary Care, Stroke Unit, Oncology, General Medical Wards, Surgical Wards etc etc. (I'm a Student MH Nurse hencewhy I know more roles within MH than I do in adult field, but Adult Nurses are EVERYWHERE lol.)

All fields of nursing will study the Common Foundation Program (CFP) in your first year where you will learn the values and theory that underpins every nursing practice. So regardless of whether you're studying Adult or Mental Health, you will learn things like Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology, basic life support, manual handling, drug calculations, healthcare ethics and law etc. You will likely have some field-specific modules too.
From second year onwards, you'll consolidate a lot of your field-specific knowledge. Your chosen uni will probably have modules listed on their websites so you can look at the differences in learning content between Adult & MH fields.

Your placements will typically be in the field you choose. (If it's different at other uni's please educate me otherwise but at my uni & all the uni's I know of, even on your CFP you'll have field-specific placements... It is rare for a Student Children's Nurse to end up on placement in a Geriatric Ward for example, or a Student Adult Nurse to end up on placement in a Psychiatric ICU.) Maybe consider the areas you would like to go to on placement and it may help you decide which field you're more interested in. More info on placements here: https://www.nursingtimesjobs.com/new...our-placements

Heres some more info on becoming a Registered Mental Health Nurse: https://www.nurses.co.uk/nursing/blo...alth-nurse-do/
And info on becoming a Registered Nurse (Adult): https://www.nurses.co.uk/nursing/blo...ered-nurse-do/
Last edited by moosec; 1 year ago
4
reply
Emily_B
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Just to add to what Moosec has said....
I qualified as an Adult nurse in September. Throughout my 3 years at uni, we studied:
- Professional development. This was generic all the way through, started with the NMC Code, ethics, law/legislation, evidence based practice and developed from there.
- Public Health. This started off generic and was field specific by 3rd year. I started off enthusiastic about this, but by 2nd year was fed up of it. Enthusiastic lecturers made it easier to bear.
- A&P/pharmacology. This also started off generic (exam at the end of the module), then went field specific from 2nd year. I quite enjoyed this all the way through.
- Skills sessions started off generic and then went field specific from 2nd year.
- Manual handling, basic life support and maths were always generic.
A&P and public health also meant looking at multidisciplinary team working and what services are available.

My adult nurse placements looked like this:
- school immunisations. Quite how this was an adult nurse placement I'm not sure, but it got my evidence of exposure to children in on my documents.
- elderly medicine. Learned loads about basic personal care.
- day surgery. Basics of pre/post op care learned.
- coronary care - still remember bits from basic cardiology
- A&E. Saw all sorts there.
- nursing home. Back to basics.
- stroke unit. Really interesting.
- Trauma & orthopaedics
- vascular
I enjoyed elderly medicine, coronary care, stroke unit, ortho. Not keen on school imms, day surgery, nursing home. Genuinely hated A&E (other people I trained with didn't like it, but loads of others loved it). Loved vascular, and ended up with a job there.
Other adult nurses I trained with had different placements and learned different things from: health visitors, district nurses, other areas of medicine eg respiratory/gastroenterology/haematology/diabetes, other surgical areas eg ENT/colorectal/gynaecology, theatres, ICU, respite, MAU, GP surgeries, hospice.
2
reply
Ashahwe7
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by moosec)
Which field you choose will depend on what area you wish to specialise in / where you want to head in your career really.

MH Nurses will work in fields including Acute Care, Low/Medium/High Secure units, Psychiatric Intensive Care, Forensic Mental Health, CAMHS (Children & Adolescents MH), Substance Abuse, specialised units such as Personality Disorders or Eating Disorders, Perinatal MH, Community Outpatients, Older Adults Mental Health, Crisis Intervention & Home Treatment Teams, Community Psychiatric Nursing etc etc.

Adult Nurses will work in fields including GP Practices, Community Nursing, Theatre/Scrubs Nursing, Emergency Department, Trauma & Orthopaedics, Women's Health/Gynaecology, Intensive Care, Coronary Care, Stroke Unit, Oncology, General Medical Wards, Surgical Wards etc etc. (I'm a Student MH Nurse hencewhy I know more roles within MH than I do in adult field, but Adult Nurses are EVERYWHERE lol.)

All fields of nursing will study the Common Foundation Program (CFP) in your first year where you will learn the values and theory that underpins every nursing practice. So regardless of whether you're studying Adult or Mental Health, you will learn things like Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology, basic life support, manual handling, drug calculations, healthcare ethics and law etc. You will likely have some field-specific modules too.
From second year onwards, you'll consolidate a lot of your field-specific knowledge. Your chosen uni will probably have modules listed on their websites so you can look at the differences in learning content between Adult & MH fields.

Your placements will typically be in the field you choose. (If it's different at other uni's please educate me otherwise but at my uni & all the uni's I know of, even on your CFP you'll have field-specific placements... It is rare for a Student Children's Nurse to end up on placement in a Geriatric Ward for example, or a Student Adult Nurse to end up on placement in a Psychiatric ICU.) Maybe consider the areas you would like to go to on placement and it may help you decide which field you're more interested in. More info on placements here: https://www.nursingtimesjobs.com/new...our-placements

Heres some more info on becoming a Registered Mental Health Nurse: https://www.nurses.co.uk/nursing/blo...alth-nurse-do/
And info on becoming a Registered Nurse (Adult): https://www.nurses.co.uk/nursing/blo...ered-nurse-do/
By the way I have definitely seen adult and child nurses on acute psychiatric wards. I am always so baffled as to why they send them if they know that they’re going to specialise in adult anyway. Should I name drop the guilty uni ?🤭🤭🤭
0
reply
moosec
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Ashahwe7)
By the way I have definitely seen adult and child nurses on acute psychiatric wards. I am always so baffled as to why they send them if they know that they’re going to specialise in adult anyway. Should I name drop the guilty uni ?🤭🤭🤭
I've seen child nurses in CAMHS environments very occasionally actually which i suppose is to be expected tbf as Childrens Nursing also covers children & young people's mental health, but i don't think i've ever seen an adult nurse in a mental health environment personally
I assume it differs depending on which uni you're at/ what trusts you work with & how many students each area is open to - uni placement coordinators probably prioritise mental health placements for MH students etc but if there's room after to allocate some nurses from other fields they might do so? Idk how it works hahaha, I'll just go where I'm told:cool: I dunno how I'd handle it if I was a student MH nurse on an adult nurse placement, i mean i've never been in that sort of environment but I'd imagine its very different. Interesting to broaden your skills though I suppose
0
reply
NDDLB
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
Certain universities do a dual course so you can study both! I'm due to start adult and mental health nursing in September, so might be worth a look into if you want to do both!
1
reply
bunnieboo
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
thank you everyone, really appreciate you replying.

no dual courses here.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (15)
6.7%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (34)
15.18%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (38)
16.96%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (34)
15.18%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (60)
26.79%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (43)
19.2%

Watched Threads

View All