agrimakaph
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any tips/advice from a level english lit students? idk if i want to take it or not so just looking to know more about the subject
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absolutelysprout
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take it if you think you'd enjoy it. i found it a LOT of work texts weren't difficult to understand but exam technique for me was a pain in the ass so i had to be constantly practising essays. if you have a natural talent for the subject you'd probably find it less work!! there's always work you could be doing for the subject whether that'd be a practice essay or annotating and rereading your texts. make sure you keep on top of your work from day 1- organisation will help you a lot when it comes to revising for the subject!! don't leave your nea to the last minute either- i started planning mine in the year 12 summer and found it much less stressful when it came to writing up my drafts :yes:
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chloenix
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Honestly I hate English Lit. I got a 9 in GCSE and I've always loved English so much, but A Level is barely English Lit anymore, it's all about structure and irrelevant aspects that have nothing to do with the subject. I've been getting Ds and Cs all year!
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absolutelysprout
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hm idk, i guess your essays are expected to be more sophisticated etc but i feel like exam technique is still emphasised a lot more at a level which kinda ruined my enjoyment of the subject i had at gcse,
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chloenix
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I literally don't understand the structure and I've been studying it for a year now. It's very very confusing and it's completely different to GCSE in a way I find hard to describe. In GCSE you analysed a text and looked at different themes, or characters or whatever. In A Level, you only look at the text in relation with the topic. For example I study tragedy and crime texts, so I ONLY look at how the text portrays tragic and criminal elements.
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agrimakaph
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
take it if you think you'd enjoy it. i found it a LOT of work texts weren't difficult to understand but exam technique for me was a pain in the ass so i had to be constantly practising essays. if you have a natural talent for the subject you'd probably find it less work!! there's always work you could be doing for the subject whether that'd be a practice essay or annotating and rereading your texts. make sure you keep on top of your work from day 1- organisation will help you a lot when it comes to revising for the subject!! don't leave your nea to the last minute either- i started planning mine in the year 12 summer and found it much less stressful when it came to writing up my drafts :yes:
thanks! what’s the NEA like? also does it take up a lot of time to read texts? because i’ve been thinking about doing 3 essay subjects but i’m kinda worried that by taking english as one of them it will take up a lot of time rereading texts and stuff
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absolutelysprout
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non examined assessment- coursework

(Original post by agrimakaph)
thanks! what’s the NEA like? also does it take up a lot of time to read texts? because i’ve been thinking about doing 3 essay subjects but i’m kinda worried that by taking english as one of them it will take up a lot of time rereading texts and stuff
people do 3 essay based subjects and manage to come out fine- you just have to be well organised with your time and ensure you don't forget about any of your subjects!! if you read a bit of your texts each day, you'll be fine :yep: some texts you'll likely mostly cover in class- shakespeare was one that was all read at school for me.
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absolutelysprout
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whilst it wouldn't hurt you can do the research when you've actually started studying the poets. a lot of the context you learn might be useless.
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neko no basu
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(Original post by agrimakaph)
thanks! what’s the NEA like? also does it take up a lot of time to read texts? because i’ve been thinking about doing 3 essay subjects but i’m kinda worried that by taking english as one of them it will take up a lot of time rereading texts and stuff
Hi, I'm in Year 13 so I just finished and English lit A level was great, I really loved it. I know someone above mentioned that the structure was very different to GCSE but I don't personally think that it was that different. I didn't really find the jump between GCSE and A level English that demanding. Yeah, there were definitely differences. More context, the need to include critical interpretations but nothing that's not manageable. Plus your teachers will guide you through it.

I did 3 essay subjects too. English lit, geography, history and I did an EPQ which was essentially coursework. Honestly, it's fine. People always said to me, "oh I feel so sorry for you because you've got all these essays to write and you've got coursework in all your subjects!". The deadline for each subject is different and you get some lesson time to complete it. As long as you have some time management skills you will be fine. Just don't leave stuff until the last minute.

For the NEA in particular, I'm sure it varies between exam boards so you'll have to check with your school. I did OCR so you do 3 texts - 1 poetry, 1 play and 1 novel. All post 1900 and one must be post 2000. We read the play and the poetry in class and you choose your own novel. You do 2 tasks. The first is 1000 words and can be a recreative piece (writing a poem inspired by that poet and their poetry) or an analytical piece where you analyse 1 specific poem. Task 2 is 2000 words and you choose a theme that is present in your play and your novel and compare. Include some context and some critical interpretations.

In terms of re-reading texts, apart from my NEA texts, I did 6 texts. Although I didn't end up sitting my exams, I wasn't planning to re-read any of them. You don't really need to tbh. You just need to know what happens in the text (you can read through a chapter summary but by the time you've studied the text in so much depth, you pretty much remember what happens) and you need quotes. You can make a quote bank as you go along or go through the text and pick out quotes you need which is definitely less time consuming than re-reading the whole book.

Sorry for such a long post, I wanted to be as detailed as I could
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