Tomh0003
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Hi everyone! I don’t really know what to take at college. I am thinking about taking :
A Level Law - How hard is it? Is it interesting? How much revision is needed for the content?
Level 3 Criminology - How hard is it? Is it interesting? How much revision is needed per module?
Business Technical Diploma/ IT (not sure which one) How hard is Business? Is it interesting?

I want to be a pilot but A levels are not needed for modular courses. I want qualifications related to law in case I cannot become a pilot.
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mnot
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(Original post by Tomh0003)
Hi everyone! I don’t really know what to take at college. I am thinking about taking :
A Level Law - How hard is it? Is it interesting? How much revision is needed for the content?
Level 3 Criminology - How hard is it? Is it interesting? How much revision is needed per module?
Business Technical Diploma/ IT (not sure which one) How hard is Business? Is it interesting?

I want to be a pilot but A levels are not needed for modular courses. I want qualifications related to law in case I cannot become a pilot.
So How hard & work required is all relative to apptitude, personal goals & motivation so its hard to answer these. The reality for anything post-GCSE is if you want to perform to the highest standards your going to have to work hard and commit a resonable amount of time on a regular basis.

But you want to be a pilot, the best qualifications for this would be maths, further maths, physics imo. My understanding of pilot training is your going to have to learn aircraft aerodynamics (which is very heavy maths mostly using calculus) and aircraft avioincs which is also very technical and aligns more to physcics.

For a law degree, they are normally very flexible on what A-level subjects you can have and dont require A-level law, the top school are competitive. I would suggest an essay subject for this.

Perhaps you could do something like: maths, physics, law or math, physics, another essay subject. This will lign up more with the pilot training & im pretty sure os fine for applying for an LLB (fyi some unis also require the LNAT).
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by mnot)
So How hard & work required is all relative to apptitude, personal goals & motivation so its hard to answer these. The reality for anything post-GCSE is if you want to perform to the highest standards your going to have to work hard and commit a resonable amount of time on a regular basis.

But you want to be a pilot, the best qualifications for this would be maths, further maths, physics imo. My understanding of pilot training is your going to have to learn aircraft aerodynamics (which is very heavy maths mostly using calculus) and aircraft avioincs which is also very technical and aligns more to physcics.

For a law degree, they are normally very flexible on what A-level subjects you can have and dont require A-level law, the top school are competitive. I would suggest an essay subject for this.

Perhaps you could do something like: maths, physics, law or math, physics, another essay subject. This will lign up more with the pilot training & im pretty sure os fine for applying for an LLB (fyi some unis also require the LNAT).
Defo flexible on what subjects you can take (tbh OP will be fine for any A levels it's the btecs they need to wary about, if they do take one) except Scottish law which requires an essay subject.
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hope1279
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Hi there,
I'm year 13 and just finished studying Law, Sociology and Criminology and going to uni for Criminology. For A level law each college can choose which main topics to study e.g. we did criminal law, law of tort and contact law but some other colleges can choose human rights law for example so try to find out which ones your college does. The revisions not that bad if you stay on top of it from the start but there's a lot of information to learn. I found the criminal law and the tort section very interesting but contracts known to be a bit boring and complicated. As for level 3 criminology I found it really interesting. The WJEC course is split up into 4 modules with 2 exams in the first year and 2 in the second which takes some pressure off you in the second year. First year looks at campaigns for change such as Sarah's Law and reasons for criminality e.g biological factors and psychological factors. Second year looks at what it takes to gain a conviction e.g. roles of personnel and their effectiveness, different investigative techniques, how evidence is processed, rights of offenders etc. The best thing about criminology is you know exactly what questions will be asked in the exam so you already know what you're going to write and makes revision way easier. I'd definitely recommend it. Hope this helps x
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Tomh0003
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Report Thread starter 10 months ago
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(Original post by hope1279)
Hi there,
I'm year 13 and just finished studying Law, Sociology and Criminology and going to uni for Criminology. For A level law each college can choose which main topics to study e.g. we did criminal law, law of tort and contact law but some other colleges can choose human rights law for example so try to find out which ones your college does. The revisions not that bad if you stay on top of it from the start but there's a lot of information to learn. I found the criminal law and the tort section very interesting but contracts known to be a bit boring and complicated. As for level 3 criminology I found it really interesting. The WJEC course is split up into 4 modules with 2 exams in the first year and 2 in the second which takes some pressure off you in the second year. First year looks at campaigns for change such as Sarah's Law and reasons for criminality e.g biological factors and psychological factors. Second year looks at what it takes to gain a conviction e.g. roles of personnel and their effectiveness, different investigative techniques, how evidence is processed, rights of offenders etc. The best thing about criminology is you know exactly what questions will be asked in the exam so you already know what you're going to write and makes revision way easier. I'd definitely recommend it. Hope this helps x
Thank you!
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