Why is it offensive to call someone overweight but it’s not offensive to say another

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Anon462654
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Person is anorexic or underweight? And why does not eating enough or being underweight automatically lead people to think you have an eating disorder/anorexia nervosa but people who are overweight don’t have a mental health problem to do with food? Both should be treated equally.
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StriderHort
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It's generally offensive to comment negatively on peoples weight full stop. If we thought morbidly obese people were mentally healthy we wouldn't batter stomach staples into them, there just isn't a catchy name.
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Anon462654
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(Original post by StriderHort)
It's generally offensive to comment negatively on peoples weight full stop. If we thought morbidly obese people were mentally healthy we wouldn't batter stomach staples into them, there just isn't a catchy name.
As far as I know, people who are underweight don’t tend to find it offensive, they see it as a good thing.
Last edited by Anon462654; 8 months ago
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Anon462654)
As far as I know, people who are underweight don’t tend to find it offensive, they see it as a good thing.

So what gives an eating disorder therapist the right to say you’re underweight but would take offence if the person said they didn’t want to look like her For example? In my opinion if you are going to be an eating disorder therapist at least make sure you’re a healthy weight and not overweight because patients may criticise/curse you.
I specified negative comments, most people like compliments, but generally people don't much like being told they're unhealthy, ill looking and not looking after themselves. Or conversely, a gross fat pig with a pack of sausages for a neck.

Talking about your ED therapist is pretty specific, not a lot I can really say there, she would likely argue do as i say, not as i do and I suspect her instructions are tailored toward a healthy weight rather than her own.
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fallen_acorns
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Both should be acceptable. Societal pressure is one of the biggest things that keeps the majority of people trying to be a healthy weight. It can have the reverse effect for a minority, for whom it hinders their ability to loose/gain weight, but the general rule should be what works for the mass, and that is a general societal pressure to stay a healthy weight. Its then up to us to make exceptions to that rule if we know a certain person is struggling or sensitive to those type of comments.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Anon462654)
Person is anorexic or underweight? And why does not eating enough or being underweight automatically lead people to think you have an eating disorder/anorexia nervosa but people who are overweight don’t have a mental health problem to do with food? Both should be treated equally.
It is rather rude to comment on someone's weight unless you are a medical professional giving that person medical advice. I wouldn't comment if I thought someone was too fat or too thin because where do personal comments end? You're a bit fat/thin - well you're a bit ugly/unintelligent? Best just to keep the negative comments to yourself
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mnot
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(Original post by Anon462654)
Person is anorexic or underweight? And why does not eating enough or being underweight automatically lead people to think you have an eating disorder/anorexia nervosa but people who are overweight don’t have a mental health problem to do with food? Both should be treated equally.
I am overweight, its not offensive to say so. It is a fact.

I dont have a problem with people talking about encouraging people to maintain a healthy weight, I think this should be encouraged and is something I am working to get back to; its not rocket science people who maintain a healthy weight are far less at risk from cancer, heart disease, diabetes etc.

If anyone wants to have a sensible honest conversation then thats fine.
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glassalice
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(Original post by Anon462654)
Person is anorexic or underweight? And why does not eating enough or being underweight automatically lead people to think you have an eating disorder/anorexia nervosa but people who are overweight don’t have a mental health problem to do with food? Both should be treated equally.
Not all people who are underweight have an eating disorder in the same way that not all people that are overweight/ obease have an eating disorder.
If you consider an eating disorder like bulimia, most sufferers don't loose a significant amount of weight overall. All bulimics (by definition) will have a normal BMI (or greater).
So there is no specific look. So if you where to meet 'a bulimic' in the street you would have no idea that they might be bulimic.
However someone diagnosed with anorexia (I am not including *some* cases of aytipical here) would have a likely have certain stereotyped 'look' in terms of their weight. (to add context, anorexia makes up a relatively small proportion of all cases of ED)

Point being that alot of people with eating disorders don't apear to have eating disorders.

That is a problem that doesn't just effect people socially, it also effects the treatment people get.
ED Community services will often only accept referrals to see people when they are significantly underweight (I don't know the exact BMI but I *think* it's less than at least 17.5). This is where alot of the news articles about 'not being sick enough' are about.
It's going to be the same OR worse for inpatient treatment, unless you are medically critical.
Last edited by glassalice; 8 months ago
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