Which Greek/Roman heroes were stoics and which were epicureans?

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Cat.killeen
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Are all classical heroes stoics? Which heroes, like Oddesyus or Aeneas, show the traits of an epicurean or a stoic?
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becausethenight
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It may well depend on who's writing them, and the context of the work. Typically Roman heroes will be stoic, as stoicism was a very popular Roman belief system, unless you're reading Lucretius.
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MindMax2000
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Stoics, as far as I know, describes a person who works hard now to the fruits of labour later in life.
An epicurian, by contrast, describes a person who is about pleasure here and now.

Most hero epics I've came across in Greek literature tend to focus on the hero overcoming a challenge through hardship. So in that context, very much stoic. That's not to say they did not have their follies and went through periods of acting like epicurians. e.g. Odysseus had to go through a number of trials in order to get back home, but there was a time when he and his crew stayed on an island longer than they should have due to the nymph Calypso. In the 5th of the 12 labours of Hercules/Heracles, Eurystheus extended his labours because Hercules was paid for cleaning the stables and that he directed the river to clean them instead of doing them himself - although arguably not epicurian by any account.
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becausethenight
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Stoics, as far as I know, describes a person who works hard now to the fruits of labour later in life.
An epicurian, by contrast, describes a person who is about pleasure here and now.
It can be a tad more complicated than that as they're both complex Classical belief systems with differing views on what it means to live a meaningful life.

For Stoics, a good life is a virtuous one, where you're focused solely on virtue and accept the present, not controlled by your desires and ambitions. No situation or circumstance is good or bad, they're just opportunities to develop virtue (these are Plato's virtues of wisdom, courage, justice and temperance). As such, Aeneas might be viewed as a failed stoic, who tries to achieve virtue/pietas in going about the founding of Rome despite his personal tragedies, but is instead overcome by his emotions, such as when he kills Turnus as revenge for Pallas in rage (all literary opinions my own, etc) Agammenon, in killing Iphigenia, could be seen as embodying stoic virtue - he kills his own daughter in his role as the virtuous leader, despite his fatherly feelings. I believe Aeschylus describes him as "putting on the yoke of necessity" around l200 of the Agamemnon? Make of that what you will.

Epicureans, in contrast, see good as pleasure which is both natural and necessary and advocate for a quiet life with simple pleasures, not tormenting the mind with ambition. As you point out, the narrative of the Greek Homeric hero (a somewhat dubious classification) with the emphasis on glory in battle, is pretty opposed to Epicureanism. We could see Aeneas as perhaps tending towards Epicureanism in what he wants - to stay with Dido, to protect his family and traditions. Virgil is often seen as influenced by Lucretius, a major Roman Epicurean (and bad poet)

This is of course a bit of a simplification and both schools of thought also have opinions on politics and science as well as ethics.

It's also a very long rant This is why I shouldn't be allowed on the internet...
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