aw03
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so i’m holding a place for biomedical science at Lancaster University and my aims for the future are to become a toxicologist either in industry, PHD or the NHS.

my question is: am i at a disadvantage studying biomedical science for my undergraduate? and would it be better to switch to biochemistry?

i worry that i’ll be missing a lot of the chemistry required to become a toxicologist if i continue with my biomed degree rather than doing one in biochemistry.

thank you so much!
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Cookie0799
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Biomedical Science is accredited at the university of Lancaster this means you will be able to work for the NHS when you graduate and is a huge advantage when applying to the NHS scientist training program, as you already have the understanding they expect. When I looked at applying for the program they noted that competition is with people who have NHS accredited degrees so I don't think you would be disadvantaged. In terms of academia or industry these positions are much more determined by your experience than your degree content, so I think it would be wise to stick with Biomed
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aw03
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(Original post by Cookie0799)
Biomedical Science is accredited at the university of Lancaster this means you will be able to work for the NHS when you graduate and is a huge advantage when applying to the NHS scientist training program, as you already have the understanding they expect. When I looked at applying for the program they noted that competition is with people who have NHS accredited degrees so I don't think you would be disadvantaged. In terms of academia or industry these positions are much more determined by your experience than your degree content, so I think it would be wise to stick with Biomed
thank you so much for replying! i am leaning more towards staying with biomed due to what you said & also i’ll have a chance to explore other disciplines like microbiology & immunology that i could potentially like more and decide to go into.

thanks again i really appreciate it 💖!
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Cookie0799)
Biomedical Science is accredited at the university of Lancaster this means you will be able to work for the NHS when you graduate and is a huge advantage when applying to the NHS scientist training program, as you already have the understanding they expect. When I looked at applying for the program they noted that competition is with people who have NHS accredited degrees so I don't think you would be disadvantaged. In terms of academia or industry these positions are much more determined by your experience than your degree content, so I think it would be wise to stick with Biomed
The NHS don't accredit degrees.

The IBMS accredit degrees, and it lacks any value unless you're wanting to become a Biomedical Scientist. I knew a Consultant Clinical Scientist who is on the interview panels for the STP. She was insistent that once you meet the initial entry requirement then your qualifications are shelved. They don't come into it.
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Cookie0799
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
The NHS don't accredit degrees.

The IBMS accredit degrees, and it lacks any value unless you're wanting to become a Biomedical Scientist. I knew a Consultant Clinical Scientist who is on the interview panels for the STP. She was insistent that once you meet the initial entry requirement then your qualifications are shelved. They don't come into it.
I know they dont accredit degrees, but IBMS qualifies to work in an NHS lab right? Providing qualifications are shelved surely the degree qualifying to work in an nhs lab is the more sensible option for the OP as if they decided to pursue NHS STP later in life they’d have experience of working within the NHS?
Last edited by Cookie0799; 6 months ago
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Cookie0799)
I know they dont accredit degrees, but IBMS qualifies to work in an NHS lab right? Providing qualifications are shelved surely the degree qualifying to work in an nhs lab is the more sensible option for the OP as if they decided to pursue NHS STP later in life they’d have experience of working within the NHS?
Doing an IBMS accredited degree doesn't mean you've worked in the NHS
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aw03
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
The NHS don't accredit degrees.

The IBMS accredit degrees, and it lacks any value unless you're wanting to become a Biomedical Scientist. I knew a Consultant Clinical Scientist who is on the interview panels for the STP. She was insistent that once you meet the initial entry requirement then your qualifications are shelved. They don't come into it.
in your opinion, do you think biomedical science or biochemistry is better for toxicology? or do they hold the same weight?
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RegisteredBMS
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Most of what the other guy said is pretty irrelevant as the discussion isn't about working in the NHS so IBMS accreditation doesn't matter.

I'm not a toxicologist but I'd trust my own research rather than asking other people if I was you.
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aw03
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
Most of what the other guy said is pretty irrelevant as the discussion isn't about working in the NHS so IBMS accreditation doesn't matter.

I'm not a toxicologist but I'd trust my own research rather than asking other people if I was you.
damn bro i’m just asking 💀
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MarshallOs
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Toxicology involves chemistry. But i really don't know much about this topic, but have you looked at masters in toxicology and their bacherlors requirements?
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davidthomasjnr
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(Original post by aw03)
in your opinion, do you think biomedical science or biochemistry is better for toxicology? or do they hold the same weight?
I would argue there is little difference at undergraduate level, in terms of exposure or relevant knowledge. I think the most important factor is achieving a good undergrad degree in either biochemistry or biomedical science (1st/ 2:1), and then to improve your chances if you are really interested in the toxicology STP by that point, a masters in toxicology and/ or relevant work experience.

Accredited biomedical science degrees generally have less flexibility in module choice throughout the programme, due to the requirement of several compulsory modules for students to enter a biomedical scientist training programme. Moreover, biomedical science programmes vary by university due to the expertise of the lecturers and general requirements of any biomedical science programme. Therefore, most biomedical science degrees have limited toxicology exposure. The vast majority of universities offering biomedical science have at least 1 toxicology module as an option in third year, normally requiring the student to have taken pharmacology as an option in second year, but most undergraduate students don't get more exposure than that.

In comparison, biochemistry students have larger flexibility in module choice, as they have less compulsory modules compared to biomedical students. Hence, the main variable determining toxicology exposure in biochemistry is the differences between each university's programme content. Having said this, you would be unlikely to have much more experience in toxicology by doing biochemistry compared to biomedical science anyway, as it is more of a specialist subject covered at masters level than undergrad, unless you do a placement in industry during undergrad.

I would suggest prioritising your search to try and find either a biochemistry or biomedical programme which suites your broader interests, offers optional modules in toxicology or related topics so you could have a taster, and gives you the option to do a year in industry/ placement. This would set you up nicely to apply to the STP directly, or do a masters if you want extra experience/ want to be more competitive/ do a PhD. I am a biomedical science graduate with an accredited degree, and I loved every moment of my degree. However, I am sure biochemistry would equally be fulfilling if you keep your options open.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by aw03)
damn bro i’m just asking 💀
It's a valid point. Invest in your own career. Had I sought advice and acted on it I'd have delayed my career by at least 18 months.
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Zuko98
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(Original post by aw03)
in your opinion, do you think biomedical science or biochemistry is better for toxicology? or do they hold the same weight?
You can pick toxicology as an optional module when studying Biomedical Science. Biochemistry isn't an IBMS accredited. Only certain universities are accredited for Biomedical science. So this can hinder you when applying for a job for the NHS. But there are top up modules that can be taken after your degree to compensate but this does cost and can add extra years.
Last edited by Zuko98; 4 months ago
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