Angus10101
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Hi All, I just have a few questions regarding entry requirements and other general issues.

So I'm a student at a Scottish secondary school and I'm now in my 5th year of education studying towards my highers which are, Mathematics, English, History, Modern Studies, RMPS and Drama. I recently finished my Nat 5's and my expected grades are 4 A's and 2 B's. For my highers I am aiming for 6 A's which will require a lot of work. For my Advanced Highers I want to achieve 3 A's in English, History, Modern Studies. I have also applied for the reach program.

But so far I've seen a lot of people talking mainly about applying to law with A levels and GCSE's which are all achieved from English education and i was wandering if Scottish education puts me at a disadvantage.

I have a number of extra curricular activities and achievements but does this make a difference when applying to Uni's because I've heard that some Uni's such as Glasgow don't even read the personal statements.

I have choices for universities but I'm skeptical on what courses are needed for different types of specialisms but preferably I would want to practice law in England and get into in Corporate law and I've heard about the, "Magic circle firms", but I've honestly got no clue what they are if someone could explain it to me that would be great.
Also what course would be best suited for me with the chosen specialism. Sorry if my questions seem a bit vague I'm just really clueless.

I know that competition is high to get into these universities but here are my choices, Glasgow, Durham, Edinburugh. Given my circumstantial qualifications do you think my chances of getting into the universities are High or low. Once again sorry for such vague questions if anyone could reply with links to sites giving information or just general information that would be very helpful thank you.
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PetitePanda
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Ofc Scottish education wouldn't put you in a disadvantage. Most people study from an English education apply for English law while some people with Scottish education do apply for English some might want to do Scottish law or they want to go to a Scottish uni for free - it's a matter of choice tbh (unless I'm wrong). Ofc those make a difference as you still need to talk about your interest in law and the course and your suitability to that course so the personal statement is very important. However, you will see unis having more importance in other factors like LNAT for Glasgow, interview for Oxford and personal statement for LSE and etc. However, the personal statement is important for most unis as it shows you do a passion for that course and can differentiate you from other applicants if there are no interview or admissions tests that can show you are different. I'm a bit confused on your 4th paragraph tbh. If you want to practise law in England, are you looking to do an English law degree or any law degree and do a conversion if you choose to do Scottish law?
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Angus10101
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
Ofc Scottish education wouldn't put you in a disadvantage. Most people study from an English education apply for English law while some people with Scottish education do apply for English some might want to do Scottish law or they want to go to a Scottish uni for free - it's a matter of choice tbh (unless I'm wrong). Ofc those make a difference as you still need to talk about your interest in law and the course and your suitability to that course so the personal statement is very important. However, you will see unis having more importance in other factors like LNAT for Glasgow, interview for Oxford and personal statement for LSE and etc. However, the personal statement is important for most unis as it shows you do a passion for that course and can differentiate you from other applicants if there are no interview or admissions tests that can show you are different. I'm a bit confused on your 4th paragraph tbh. If you want to practise law in England, are you looking to do an English law degree or any law degree and do a conversion if you choose to do Scottish law?
Hi thank you for the insight solves my problems and with the fourth paragraph I would like to do an English law degree but im not sure if many Scottish Universitys will offer an English law degree, I was looking at the common law degrees as well which is offered at Glasgow but not sure its the path I want to take. That's quite interesting with the different universitys having different preferences about applicants, gives me a better idea. With the LNATS what does it entail is it something that I should start revising for now and will I take that before I apply to Uni?

Thank you.
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Angus10101)
Hi thank you for the insight solves my problems and with the fourth paragraph I would like to do an English law degree but im not sure if many Scottish Universitys will offer an English law degree, I was looking at the common law degrees as well which is offered at Glasgow but not sure its the path I want to take. That's quite interesting with the different universitys having different preferences about applicants, gives me a better idea. With the LNATS what does it entail is it something that I should start revising for now and will I take that before I apply to Uni?

Thank you.
I cant think of any thats decent for a Scottish uni except Glasgow. Edinburgh doesnt have a english law course bare in mind. LNAT (Law National Admission Test) is an external admission test that certain unis do, which has a multiple choice section and an essay question. When are you apply for uni like which entry? Depends on what unis you want to go for - What unis are you planning to go to like all of your options?
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Angus10101
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
I cant think of any thats decent for a Scottish uni except Glasgow. Edinburgh doesnt have a english law course bare in mind. LNAT (Law National Admission Test) is an external admission test that certain unis do, which has a multiple choice section and an essay question. When are you apply for uni like which entry? Depends on what unis you want to go for - What unis are you planning to go to like all of your options?
Okay thats good as Glasgow is one of my choices. Ill be applying for uni in 2022 as that is when I finish 6th year i'm not taking a gap year. My choices of unis at the moment are Glasgow, Durham, Oxford. Edinburgh was on the list but considering it doesn't have a English law degree offer that's off the table. I'm not really sure about what other University's to go for in Scotland especially as I don't know what other University's are good that offer an English law degree. Obviously tuition fees are also another matter with the English Uni's.
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Angus10101)
Okay thats good as Glasgow is one of my choices. Ill be applying for uni in 2022 as that is when I finish 6th year i'm not taking a gap year. My choices of unis at the moment are Glasgow, Durham, Oxford. Edinburgh was on the list but considering it doesn't have a English law degree offer that's off the table. I'm not really sure about what other University's to go for in Scotland especially as I don't know what other University's are good that offer an English law degree. Obviously tuition fees are also another matter with the English Uni's.
Oh then you dont need to take the LNAT now but in the summer before you apply. You need to register for the LNAT for all Glasgow, Durham and Oxford and you sit it by or on Oxford 15th. Ofc I suggest asking in a new post if there is an Scottish unis that offer decent english law degrees apart from Glasgow but I really cant think of any in my mind. Do you want to be a solicitor or barrister?
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Angus10101
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Oh right that's a relief thought I was going to have to start it soon or something aha. Okay I will do that at a later point i'm still new to this whole forum thing my brother suggested it to me and still finding out how to do a lot of things. I'm not really sure what the difference is between a solicitor and a barrister could you possibly tell me, sorry im really lacking on information about law tbh.
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Angus10101)
Oh right that's a relief thought I was going to have to start it soon or something aha. Okay I will do that at a later point i'm still new to this whole forum thing my brother suggested it to me and still finding out how to do a lot of things. I'm not really sure what the difference is between a solicitor and a barrister could you possibly tell me, sorry im really lacking on information about law tbh.
Nooo normally people do it in the summer. If you search it up, that will give you a better explanation that what I could describe tbh
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Angus10101
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
Nooo normally people do it in the summer. If you search it up, that will give you a better explanation that what I could describe tbh
Okay that's great ill take a look at it the now, thank you so much for your insight it has proved most helpful but that's all for now. Ill do some further research into university's as well
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Angus10101)
I'm not really sure what the difference is between a solicitor and a barrister could you possibly tell me, sorry im really lacking on information about law tbh.
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/solicitor

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/barrister
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Angus10101
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Thank you!
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