S_Soor
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#1
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Im having a hard time choosing between studying A level law, or my 3 original subjects which is English lit, history and sociology. I want to study law in uni when I'm older, and doing A level law makes more sense to me, but I'm not very good with memorisation. I was thinking maybe if I do my 3 original subjects I can just read a law book on the side to get me prepared, but I'm not exactly sure what to choose and I don't know if a level law is going to help me to get started started in uni or not.
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999tigger
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(Original post by S_Soor)
Im having a hard time choosing between studying A level law, or my 3 original subjects which is English lit, history and sociology. I want to study law in uni when I'm older, and doing A level law makes more sense to me, but I'm not very good with memorisation. I was thinking maybe if I do my 3 original subjects I can just read a law book on the side to get me prepared, but I'm not exactly sure what to choose and I don't know if a level law is going to help me to get started started in uni or not.
Yes if you are interested, enthusiastic and can get a top grade with less effort than the others. Most undergrads will never have studied law before uni. Grades are what you need for A level.
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ohnojay
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(Original post by S_Soor)
Im having a hard time choosing between studying A level law, or my 3 original subjects which is English lit, history and sociology. I want to study law in uni when I'm older, and doing A level law makes more sense to me, but I'm not very good with memorisation. I was thinking maybe if I do my 3 original subjects I can just read a law book on the side to get me prepared, but I'm not exactly sure what to choose and I don't know if a level law is going to help me to get started started in uni or not.
Law A-level isn't required for a law at uni, neither is any A-level though an essay-writing subject is helpful (English lit and history is good).
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PetitePanda
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You dont need to do A level law. You can do any A levels you want; the most important things is to choose the A levels you enjoy so you can motivate yourself to get the high grades you want. Honestly, although a level law might give you an insight in law, wider reading gives you more freedom and flexibility to learn about law. I personally wouldnt want to do law as an A level as I would feel that would be too stressful for me so I like doing stuff for law in my free time and it's given me the freedom to choose what I want to know more about than a more controlled curriculum to law. For example, ofc I would learn the compulsory modules for a law degree but there's so much you could learn - for example, I was interested in teh role of IA in the legal sector, which you wouldnt learn in a level law. Honestly, it's your choice and I think sticking to your original option would be good since you already chose it but if you want to do A level law, totally go for it. However, you wont need to know anything for law at uni as it will get taught to you so dont worry about the preparation for law until the summer in yr 13.
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lawcalling
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You don't need to do A-Level law, however I did and it really helped me to grips with some core concepts which are used in the first year of most LLB's (if not, second year). My A-Levels actually covered around 50% of my LLB criminal and tort modules, so I definitely had a headstart. However, not taking law will not put you 'behind' considering most students don't have the option to do law at A-Level. Obviously you'll still need to hit the target entry requirements, but if you think you can achieve the necessary grade in law then go for it.
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S_Soor
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
You dont need to do A level law. You can do any A levels you want; the most important things is to choose the A levels you enjoy so you can motivate yourself to get the high grades you want. Honestly, although a level law might give you an insight in law, wider reading gives you more freedom and flexibility to learn about law. I personally wouldnt want to do law as an A level as I would feel that would be too stressful for me so I like doing stuff for law in my free time and it's given me the freedom to choose what I want to know more about than a more controlled curriculum to law. For example, ofc I would learn the compulsory modules for a law degree but there's so much you could learn - for example, I was interested in teh role of IA in the legal sector, which you wouldnt learn in a level law. Honestly, it's your choice and I think sticking to your original option would be good since you already chose it but if you want to do A level law, totally go for it. However, you wont need to know anything for law at uni as it will get taught to you so dont worry about the preparation for law until the summer in yr 13.
Wow, this was a really helpful answer. Thank you! And, that's what I was thinking of doing; reading of law in my free time so I can at least have some insight on it.
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S_Soor
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(Original post by lawcalling)
You don't need to do A-Level law, however I did and it really helped me to grips with some core concepts which are used in the first year of most LLB's (if not, second year). My A-Levels actually covered around 50% of my LLB criminal and tort modules, so I definitely had a headstart. However, not taking law will not put you 'behind' considering most students don't have the option to do law at A-Level. Obviously you'll still need to hit the target entry requirements, but if you think you can achieve the necessary grade in law then go for it.
Since you did A level law, can I ask how it was? Because I've heard theres a lot of memorisation and I'm not good at that, and apparently theres a lot of case studies you need to remember for tests.
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Euphoria101
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(Original post by S_Soor)
Since you did A level law, can I ask how it was? Because I've heard theres a lot of memorisation and I'm not good at that, and apparently theres a lot of case studies you need to remember for tests.
I was going to do AS Law this year...needless to say I dropped it. However, I was self-studying so it was different. But there is a LOT of memorisation ngl. What exam board would you be with?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by S_Soor)
Since you did A level law, can I ask how it was? Because I've heard theres a lot of memorisation and I'm not good at that, and apparently theres a lot of case studies you need to remember for tests.
You've mentioned 'memorisation' (sic) more than once, and now you're talking about 'lot(s) of case studies' - both of which you clearly don't want to do.

Why, exactly, are you planning on doing law at university? Both memory work and cases (literally hundreds and hundreds of cases) are absolutely fundamental to the study of law. If you don't like them now, what makes you think you'll like them in a couple of years' time?
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S_Soor
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(Original post by Euphoria101)
I was going to do AS Law this year...needless to say I dropped it. However, I was self-studying so it was different. But there is a LOT of memorisation ngl. What exam board would you be with?
Most likely AQA since I would need to move schools in order to do a level law, and the only schools near me do AQA
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swrhaa
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A level Law would broaden your understanding about the law and would give you an insight to what the Legal system is like. My brother studies law and did study A level Law. He regrets doing A level Law because whatever you covered at A level, would be covered again during your LLB degree. I hope this helps, but after all its your choice. Hope you make the right decision for yourself x
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