JackTed12
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Anyone need any advice for Sociology , Spanish or English Literature GCSE or A level? I am happy to help.
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TheHistoryNerd_
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(Original post by JackTed12)
Anyone need any advice for Sociology , Spanish or English Literature GCSE or A level? I am happy to help.
Hello! I've applied for both Spanish and English Literature A-level, any chance you could tell me what they're like - are they as difficult as I think they are? Also, any tips on how to revise for Spanish at A-level because at GCSE, Spanish was the one subject that I didn't have a clue how to revise for, I just did past papers and wrote down key vocab? Thanks.
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JackTed12
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(Original post by TheHistoryNerd_)
Hello! I've applied for both Spanish and English Literature A-level, any chance you could tell me what they're like - are they as difficult as I think they are? Also, any tips on how to revise for Spanish at A-level because at GCSE, Spanish was the one subject that I didn't have a clue how to revise for, I just did past papers and wrote down key vocab? Thanks.
Hey, It is amazing that you have applied for such valued A-levels. Spanish and English Literature are similar in the format where you have to read a whole text and then get assed on it at the end of the two years of study.

For English Lit , I would say that it is not the easiest A-level , for my exam board Eduqas you need to read 9 set texted with 71 poems which at first I was astounded by the work load but if you stay steady you can manage. Make sure to read specification and past exam questions, Eduqas are great for posting the recent exam series papers! If you enjoyed it at GCSE then it will be amazing for you at A-level as there is so much i included at GCSE that i didn't even know was A-Level standard. I would say as long as you got a 4 or above in GCSE you should enjoy it.

Spanish is a great subject which shows determination , it is quite heavy at first than GCSE with topics such as Law and Politics being studied in Spanish which I was apprehensive at first but now enjoy, I would say as long as you was able to achieve grade 4 or above you will enjoy it! It is very similar to Lit as you read texts and answer exam questions in the same format which can be challenging at times . The speaking exam is similar to GCSE but more realistic and a picture prompt.

Overall , I would say choose these subjects if you enjoyed them and at the end of two years. I am sure you will walk out with 3 C's minimum as anything above that is great, Revising for languages is easy with Quizlet and Duolingo and keep up vocab and papers although past papers may be a little bit tricky before the A level content is taught as it is different from GCSE. Just go on and look at getting familiar with the structure!

Hope I helped
Jack. Y12
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TheHistoryNerd_
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(Original post by JackTed12)
Hey, It is amazing that you have applied for such valued A-levels. Spanish and English Literature are similar in the format where you have to read a whole text and then get assed on it at the end of the two years of study.

For English Lit , I would say that it is not the easiest A-level , for my exam board Eduqas you need to read 9 set texted with 71 poems which at first I was astounded by the work load but if you stay steady you can manage. Make sure to read specification and past exam questions, Eduqas are great for posting the recent exam series papers! If you enjoyed it at GCSE then it will be amazing for you at A-level as there is so much i included at GCSE that i didn't even know was A-Level standard. I would say as long as you got a 4 or above in GCSE you should enjoy it.

Spanish is a great subject which shows determination , it is quite heavy at first than GCSE with topics such as Law and Politics being studied in Spanish which I was apprehensive at first but now enjoy, I would say as long as you was able to achieve grade 4 or above you will enjoy it! It is very similar to Lit as you read texts and answer exam questions in the same format which can be challenging at times . The speaking exam is similar to GCSE but more realistic and a picture prompt.

Overall , I would say choose these subjects if you enjoyed them and at the end of two years. I am sure you will walk out with 3 C's minimum as anything above that is great, Revising for languages is easy with Quizlet and Duolingo and keep up vocab and papers although past papers may be a little bit tricky before the A level content is taught as it is different from GCSE. Just go on and look at getting familiar with the structure!

Hope I helped
Jack. Y12
Thanks for the reply, I really appreciated it! Best of luck to you with your A-level exams next year!
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Quick-use
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(Original post by JackTed12)
Spanish is a great subject which shows determination , it is quite heavy at first than GCSE with topics such as Law and Politics being studied in Spanish which I was apprehensive at first but now enjoy, I would say as long as you was able to achieve grade 4 or above you will enjoy it! It is very similar to Lit as you read texts and answer exam questions in the same format which can be challenging at times .
Are you sure that people who might have only achieved a 4 in GCSE Spanish will be able to enjoy and do well in A level Spanish...? I can't imagine recommending someone with a 4 to take an A level for anything, especially subjects like Spanish or Maths etc. :no:
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JackTed12
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I definitely think a grade 4 or above student will enjoy Spanish A - level as a 4 is a pass so therefore one must have enjoyed it. No matter what grade you get you can still enjoy a subject. Spanish is a great example of a subject were you could just go to the country and speak it , I don't think when I go to Barcelona and talk to a receptionist they are going to say " You only got a 4 in GCSE Spanish so you cant learn anything more" Anyone with determination to succeed in anything in life from exams to buying a house would let something as an exam you took at 16 put you off from doing something you enjoyed. You took four exam at 16; anything could have happened that day and people are trying to stop you from engaging in a language you want to go further in. I believe in self belief and motivation, and a grade just isn't the end of anything if you have passion! I wonder if you took GCSE Spanish or A level Spanish since you seem to think a 4 isn't good enough. 4 = PASS And for the note , Math and Spanish are no way similar.

Thanks ,
Jack Y12 - Passionate of not letting a number hold you back !
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by JackTed12)
I definitely think a grade 4 or above student will enjoy Spanish A - level as a 4 is a pass so therefore one must have enjoyed it. No matter what grade you get you can still enjoy a subject. Spanish is a great example of a subject were you could just go to the country and speak it , I don't think when I go to Barcelona and talk to a receptionist they are going to say " You only got a 4 in GCSE Spanish so you cant learn anything more" Anyone with determination to succeed in anything in life from exams to buying a house would let something as an exam you took at 16 put you off from doing something you enjoyed. You took four exam at 16; anything could have happened that day and people are trying to stop you from engaging in a language you want to go further in. I believe in self belief and motivation, and a grade just isn't the end of anything if you have passion! I wonder if you took GCSE Spanish or A level Spanish since you seem to think a 4 isn't good enough. 4 = PASS And for the note , Math and Spanish are no way similar.

Thanks ,
Jack Y12 - Passionate of not letting a number hold you back !
Just for reference, the person you are indirectly replying to has a degree in modern languages and so is fairly well placed to comment on language ability and progression in the language...

More generally, I would echo their advice in terms of GCSE performance and choosing a language A-level; language A-levels are widely known to be quite demanding with high workloads and not particularly easy content, and moreover will expect you to have a foundation in GCSE knowledge to continue to it. Simply put, a 4 at GCSE in a language does not really suggest a suitable basis for continuing to the A-level, because if you had a good grasp of the grammar, vocab, speaking and listening skills etc, as required to effectively progress to the A-level material, you would get more than a 4 at GCSE.

That isn't to say one couldn't continue with the subject and enjoy it in a non-examinable way, but taking the A-level after getting only a 4 at GCSE, without putting in a LOT of work to catch up to where they realistically need to be before starting the A-level in the fall, is almost certainly setting themselves up to fail. Subjects like Spanish (and maths for that matter) are among those where enjoyment alone won't sustain you through the course and you do need a solid foundation in the GCSE material which underpins what you will study at A-level in order to continue enjoying the subject and to do well in it. For those subjects enjoying and being interested in them is a necessary but not sufficient criteria to be able to do well in them.

Speaking as someone who was allowed to progress in a subject where I didn't have the appropriate background for it, and failed horribly as a result, despite my enthusiasm for the subject and enjoyment of it, it's not good advice to encourage people into that situation. It's a terrible situation to be in and not one I would wish on any other student.
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TheHistoryNerd_
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Just for reference, the person you are indirectly replying to has a degree in modern languages and so is fairly well placed to comment on language ability and progression in the language...

More generally, I would echo their advice in terms of GCSE performance and choosing a language A-level; language A-levels are widely known to be quite demanding with high workloads and not particularly easy content, and moreover will expect you to have a foundation in GCSE knowledge to continue to it. Simply put, a 4 at GCSE in a language does not really suggest a suitable basis for continuing to the A-level, because if you had a good grasp of the grammar, vocab, speaking and listening skills etc, as required to effectively progress to the A-level material, you would get more than a 4 at GCSE.

That isn't to say one couldn't continue with the subject and enjoy it in a non-examinable way, but taking the A-level after getting only a 4 at GCSE, without putting in a LOT of work to catch up to where they realistically need to be before starting the A-level in the fall, is almost certainly setting themselves up to fail. Subjects like Spanish (and maths, although it is content-wise very different) are among those where enjoyment alone won't sustain you through the course and you do need a solid foundation in the GCSE material which underpins what you will study at A-level in order to continue enjoying the subject and to do well in it. For those subjects enjoying and being interested in them is a necessary but not sufficient criteria to be able to do well in them.
I'd like to add that at all the college's around me, you do need a minimum of a grade 6 to get on to the Spanish A-level course (it's the same for all the A-levels, like you need a grade 6 at GCSE history to do A-level history). Unsure if this is a requirement at every college though.
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_gcx
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Just for reference, the person you are indirectly replying to has a degree in modern languages and so is fairly well placed to comment on language ability and progression in the language...

More generally, I would echo their advice in terms of GCSE performance and choosing a language A-level; language A-levels are widely known to be quite demanding with high workloads and not particularly easy content, and moreover will expect you to have a foundation in GCSE knowledge to continue to it. Simply put, a 4 at GCSE in a language does not really suggest a suitable basis for continuing to the A-level, because if you had a good grasp of the grammar, vocab, speaking and listening skills etc, as required to effectively progress to the A-level material, you would get more than a 4 at GCSE.

That isn't to say one couldn't continue with the subject and enjoy it in a non-examinable way, but taking the A-level after getting only a 4 at GCSE, without putting in a LOT of work to catch up to where they realistically need to be before starting the A-level in the fall, is almost certainly setting themselves up to fail. Subjects like Spanish (and maths for that matter) are among those where enjoyment alone won't sustain you through the course and you do need a solid foundation in the GCSE material which underpins what you will study at A-level in order to continue enjoying the subject and to do well in it. For those subjects enjoying and being interested in them is a necessary but not sufficient criteria to be able to do well in them.

Speaking as someone who was allowed to progress in a subject where I didn't have the appropriate background for it, and failed horribly as a result, despite my enthusiasm for the subject and enjoyment of it, it's not good advice to encourage people into that situation. It's a terrible situation to be in and not one I would wish on any other student.
Worth adding that the prospects in maths for someone who even got a 6 (or a B in old money) at GCSE aren't too positive, [some numbers pg 31 here, with >50% getting a D or below in the A-level] hence the common recommendation of a 7/A or above at a lot of schools. (exceptions do of course exist, but the stats aren't too encouraging) The stats seem to be even worse for Spanish with nearly 80% who got a C/4 getting a D or lower.
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JackTed12
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I say do what you enjoy and what you find interesting + what your goof at. I do a grade 4 in Spanish and now doing it at A level with a target of a B. I just put more work into it as I knew A levels would matter more than GCSE. And please don't discredit my advice as I said a grade 4 is a pass so if you want to do study it and if it will make you happy for the two years then go for it!
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KhloeLu
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Hey I’m doing A level Spanish in September (assuming we’re not in quarantine) What are the main things you wish you knew before starting Alevel Spanish and advice you’d give new year 12 thanks
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JackTed12
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(Original post by KhloeLu)
Hey I’m doing A level Spanish in September (assuming we’re not in quarantine) What are the main things you wish you knew before starting Alevel Spanish and advice you’d give new year 12 thanks
I would say make sure to have a Duolingo account and a quizlet account so over the summer you can practise the basics before you start. I would make sure you read up about some Spanish literature and authors as AQA require a literature section in the exams.
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KhloeLu
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(Original post by JackTed12)
I would say make sure to have a Duolingo account and a quizlet account so over the summer you can practise the basics before you start. I would make sure you read up about some Spanish literature and authors as AQA require a literature section in the exams.
Thank you very helpful !
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SchoolcanSMA
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(Original post by JackTed12)
I say do what you enjoy and what you find interesting + what your goof at. I do a grade 4 in Spanish and now doing it at A level with a target of a B. I just put more work into it as I knew A levels would matter more than GCSE. And please don't discredit my advice as I said a grade 4 is a pass so if you want to do study it and if it will make you happy for the two years then go for it!
I agree with you dude , nothing is impossible and if you have the passion for the subject that’s what matters-anyone could’ve got a grade 4 at gcse for multiple reasons so don’t assume
I mean people say this type of **** for many things -“you can’t self teach Spanish “ “ if you didn’t do triple you won’t be getting good grades at a level” it’s all pretty stupid
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