Piano enthusiast
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Hi, I'm 27 and looking for some advice regarding doing A levels as an adult. Specifically if it is possible to just do a couple of subjects (physics and further maths) at A2 level since I already have them at AS level, and how I would go about doing so, if anybody has any experience doing this.

I did my a levels in 2010 and got 3A in biology, chemistry and maths, and at AS level I also received 2A additionally in physics and further maths. I went to med school but dropped out. I am now interested in studying maths and physics at university, but unfortunately many good universities now require A* as entry requirements as well as further maths and/or physics at full A level.

I am going to email the admissions departments to see if I am eligible. If not I was wondering about alternatives - e.g. if any universities will accept me with a foundation year or if I will have to do A levels again/upgrade my AS levels to A2.

Had anybody been in this situation? Thanks in advance
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username3539714
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I think a foundation year would be possible but I wouldn't personally recommend it since there's additional debt and also you can just sit your A2 examinations for free within the same time frame.
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CletusPotter
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
Hi, I'm 27 and looking for some advice regarding doing A levels as an adult. Specifically if it is possible to just do a couple of subjects (physics and further maths) at A2 level since I already have them at AS level, and how I would go about doing so, if anybody has any experience doing this.

I did my a levels in 2010 and got 3A in biology, chemistry and maths, and at AS level I also received 2A additionally in physics and further maths. I went to med school but dropped out. I am now interested in studying maths and physics at university, but unfortunately many good universities now require A* as entry requirements as well as further maths and/or physics at full A level.

I am going to email the admissions departments to see if I am eligible. If not I was wondering about alternatives - e.g. if any universities will accept me with a foundation year or if I will have to do A levels again/upgrade my AS levels to A2.

Had anybody been in this situation? Thanks in advance
I'm afraid that I don't think you can study A2 levels anymore as they have been scrapped. Oddly enough AS levels still exist though.
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Sailorstrawberry
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How about an Access course?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
Hi, I'm 27 and looking for some advice regarding doing A levels as an adult. Specifically if it is possible to just do a couple of subjects (physics and further maths) at A2 level since I already have them at AS level, and how I would go about doing so, if anybody has any experience doing this.

I did my a levels in 2010 and got 3A in biology, chemistry and maths, and at AS level I also received 2A additionally in physics and further maths. I went to med school but dropped out. I am now interested in studying maths and physics at university, but unfortunately many good universities now require A* as entry requirements as well as further maths and/or physics at full A level.

I am going to email the admissions departments to see if I am eligible. If not I was wondering about alternatives - e.g. if any universities will accept me with a foundation year or if I will have to do A levels again/upgrade my AS levels to A2.

Had anybody been in this situation? Thanks in advance
Have you thought about something like Maths or Physics with an integrated foundation year like this one at Manchester? Successful completion of the foundation year gives you access to the degree course, but whether you can combine Maths and Physics I'm not sure

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...course-profile

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...undation-year/
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Piano enthusiast
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Have you thought about something like Maths or Physics with an integrated foundation year like this one at Manchester? Successful completion of the foundation year gives you access to the degree course, but whether you can combine Maths and Physics I'm not sure

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...course-profile

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...undation-year/
Thanks a lot, I'll look into it
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Piano enthusiast
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(Original post by Sailorstrawberry)
How about an Access course?
It seemed to me from the research that I've done so far that science access courses don't go into enough depth to be a replacement for a levels for universities.
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Sailorstrawberry
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
It seemed to me from the research that I've done so far that science access courses don't go into enough depth to be a replacement for a levels for universities.
I have just done an access course and it was two years of A levels in one year, it was alot of work. I did access to health professions so it was mainly biology etc but it had enough science units in it for me to not have to take a science GCSE again and I was accepted to do childrens nursing. All I need to get is my GCSE maths 😊
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Piano enthusiast
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(Original post by Sailorstrawberry)
I have just done an access course and it was two years of A levels in one year, it was alot of work. I did access to health professions so it was mainly biology etc but it had enough science units in it for me to not have to take a science GCSE again and I was accepted to do childrens nursing. All I need to get is my GCSE maths 😊
Awesome good job 🙂
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999tigger
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
Hi, I'm 27 and looking for some advice regarding doing A levels as an adult. Specifically if it is possible to just do a couple of subjects (physics and further maths) at A2 level since I already have them at AS level, and how I would go about doing so, if anybody has any experience doing this.

I did my a levels in 2010 and got 3A in biology, chemistry and maths, and at AS level I also received 2A additionally in physics and further maths. I went to med school but dropped out. I am now interested in studying maths and physics at university, but unfortunately many good universities now require A* as entry requirements as well as further maths and/or physics at full A level.

I am going to email the admissions departments to see if I am eligible. If not I was wondering about alternatives - e.g. if any universities will accept me with a foundation year or if I will have to do A levels again/upgrade my AS levels to A2.

Had anybody been in this situation? Thanks in advance
1. As said A levels are now linear and have been for c3 years. Not split into AS and A2 , just all the exams at the end of the course for 100% of the marks.
2. Colleges dont really run A levels any more, few do, but even those are limited to school age. Check with your local college.
3. Most A levels are done through private study or buying an online course. Physics you should find online easier enough, but FM is more specialised. You also have to do the practical.
4. As discussed foundation year is an option, but only the uni can tell you. I tend to be against FY in most cases because of the cost and it using HE student finance.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by 999tigger)
As discussed foundation year is an option, but only the uni can tell you. I tend to be against FY in most cases because of the cost and it using HE student finance.
I agree with you about foundation years in most cases tigger but I think in this specific case it might be the best option. OP already has good enough A levels for a medicine degree making an Access course less suitable, and is just lacking the high level Maths/Physics required for a Maths/Physics degree. Therefore I think they would be a good candidate for a foundation year like the one I linked at Manchester uni.

The best foundation years are designed for people with have high level skills already, only not in the required subjects so I think an integrated foundation year at a uni like Manchester could be the answer. You and I get suspicious as soon as we hear the words "foundation year" because too many unis use them cynically to recruit students with very poor A levels onto courses that they would never get onto normally when an Access course or A level resits would be cheaper. However, in this case I believe that the cost of using up a year of HE student finance would be justified if it is a legitimate stepping stone onto the course that OP really wants to do.
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999tigger
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I agree with you about foundation years in most cases tigger but I think in this specific case it might be the best option. OP already has good enough A levels for a medicine degree making an Access course less suitable, and is just lacking the high level Maths/Physics required for a Maths/Physics degree. Therefore I think they would be a good candidate for a foundation year like the one I linked at Manchester uni.

The best foundation years are designed for people with have high level skills already, only not in the required subjects so I think an integrated foundation year at a uni like Manchester could be the answer. You and I get suspicious as soon as we hear the words "foundation year" because too many unis use them cynically to recruit students with very poor A levels onto courses that they would never get onto normally when an Access course or A level resits would be cheaper. However, in this case I believe that the cost of using up a year of HE student finance would be justified if it is a legitimate stepping stone onto the course that OP really wants to do.
Worth investigating and yes they are a candidate. the other for someone with that level of academics is just to do an A level. Depends what the uni offers him..

So I would do further investigation and then pros and cons.

The other issue is how recent their last study was as 2010 is likely to be too old for some unis.

Hello btw. Hope you are well.
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ajj2000
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Hi

How long did you study medicine for? I'm somewhat of the view that a foundation degree might work really well for you so long as you have the funding available. Southampton would be worth contacting as they have a maths/ physics/ engineering one. A member on here had good experiences at Manchester.

Which universities are you aiming for? I guess you are aiming high given your past achievements and looking at a* courses?
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Piano enthusiast
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Hi

How long did you study medicine for? I'm somewhat of the view that a foundation degree might work really well for you so long as you have the funding available. Southampton would be worth contacting as they have a maths/ physics/ engineering one. A member on here had good experiences at Manchester.

Which universities are you aiming for? I guess you are aiming high given your past achievements and looking at a* courses?
I was eyeing up Lancaster possibly the theoretical physics with maths degree as they are highly ranked and seem to be a bit less strict on their entry requirements although they do require physics at full a level which I don't have. I might be eligible for their maths degree. I'm trying to think how to word my email to them in which I can convey my interest and willingness to do what is required for me to be eligible for and succeed in their course.
Bristol and Manchester have maths or physics degrees with a foundation year that I am going to enquire although I was studying in Manchester so I don't know how comfortable I feel going back there.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
I actually did all the years, passed my finals but they kicked me out in a fitness to practise meeting at the end as I had long standing depression and they said I wouldn't be fit to be a doctor (I had struggled a lot in previous years). Ultimately it was my fault for putting myself in that situation and quite a learning experience.
I was eyeing up Lancaster possibly the theoretical physics with maths degree as they are highly ranked and seem to be a bit less strict on their entry requirements. Manchester and Bristol also have maths or physics degrees with a foundation year that I am going to enquire although I was studying in Manchester so I don't know how comfortable I feel going back there.
Gosh you've had a very difficult time, sorry to hear that. I can recommend Lancaster, my daughter did Psychology there and really enjoyed it, they are a nice small university. Might be better to pick a different uni if you have bad memories from Manchester and I'm sure there are a few unis to choose from
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
I actually did all the years, passed my finals but they kicked me out in a fitness to practise meeting at the end as I had long standing depression and they said I wouldn't be fit to be a doctor (I had struggled a lot in previous years). Ultimately it was my fault for putting myself in that situation and quite a learning experience.
I was eyeing up Lancaster possibly the theoretical physics with maths degree as they are highly ranked and seem to be a bit less strict on their entry requirements. Manchester and Bristol also have maths or physics degrees with a foundation year that I am going to enquire although I was studying in Manchester so I don't know how comfortable I feel going back there.
Hey, sorry to hear. You must have had a really tough time. And wow - what an expense. Have you seen the open university 2+2 degrees? They are linked with Lancaster for physics , but I don't think you can do maths that way.

Given that you are cashflowing the costs, could you see if Lancaster would accept you if you took FM A level? It would get you up to speed and there is some support out there with the further maths network for people self studying. I think physics is a bit of a hassle at A level because of the practicals, but it may be possible not to do those especially as you have great grades in other subjects.
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Ghostlady
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My daughter is studying physics and particle physics at Lancaster this year. The email for them is [email protected], or if you want to contact under grad admissions its [email protected] to see what they offer. You have to have 3A's for physics 3 year bsc. You done the maths + 1 other subject for the A grade, so its just the physics you need. Further maths does help but it covers lots of things but some of them are not related to physics so its up to you if you want to take that further. You might want to brush up on the topics that matter like differential equations, matrices, vectors etc as we had a look at the modules and they are part of the course.

I would also ask them if you need the practical element of the course which is likely. if so, then you need to choose somewhere that offers that when you do physics a'level.
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Philip-flop
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
Hi, I'm 27 and looking for some advice regarding doing A levels as an adult. Specifically if it is possible to just do a couple of subjects (physics and further maths) at A2 level since I already have them at AS level, and how I would go about doing so, if anybody has any experience doing this.

I did my a levels in 2010 and got 3A in biology, chemistry and maths, and at AS level I also received 2A additionally in physics and further maths. I went to med school but dropped out. I am now interested in studying maths and physics at university, but unfortunately many good universities now require A* as entry requirements as well as further maths and/or physics at full A level.

I am going to email the admissions departments to see if I am eligible. If not I was wondering about alternatives - e.g. if any universities will accept me with a foundation year or if I will have to do A levels again/upgrade my AS levels to A2.

Had anybody been in this situation? Thanks in advance
Can I ask why it is you want to go back into education? Is it for a career change? What are you currently working as? A levels are linear now so it's pretty much AS and A2 combined into one lot of exams to give you a full grade. For students nowadays, the exams that they do in their first year don't contribute to their final grade. It is only what they sit in their second year that deciphers their grade for the A level as a whole.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Piano enthusiast)
Hi, I'm 27 and looking for some advice regarding doing A levels as an adult. Specifically if it is possible to just do a couple of subjects (physics and further maths) at A2 level since I already have them at AS level, and how I would go about doing so, if anybody has any experience doing this.

I did my a levels in 2010 and got 3A in biology, chemistry and maths, and at AS level I also received 2A additionally in physics and further maths. I went to med school but dropped out. I am now interested in studying maths and physics at university, but unfortunately many good universities now require A* as entry requirements as well as further maths and/or physics at full A level.

I am going to email the admissions departments to see if I am eligible. If not I was wondering about alternatives - e.g. if any universities will accept me with a foundation year or if I will have to do A levels again/upgrade my AS levels to A2.
Had anybody been in this situation? Thanks in advance
You have three good A levels - I would not bother with more. When are you looking to enter university? You could self-teach F Maths over the next year and go in September 2021 or look at what's available for 2020.

Which universities would you consider?
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