lauram2435
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Helloooooo

Has anyone had experience with moving from England to Scotland after their undergrad to go ahead with their teacher training/career?

I am embarking upon the third year of my BA (Hons) Primary education degree, and applications for teacher training are opening this October.

I am stuck in a bit of a rut - I have always wanted to move elsewhere and explore a new country, city, a new curriculum and explore new ways of teaching to build upon my skills and practise - however, I am looking for some advice on how to maybe go about this situation?

I am interested in also completing a Masters in Special Educational Needs, and I am torn as to when and where to do this.

Would you stay in England to do the PGCE and then go to Scotland to complete a Masters? Would you move to Scotland and train there? Or would you do both at home in England and then move for a job?

I am still, of course, researching into this (Universities, accommodation, cost of living, travel, etc) and would very much appreciate any advice from any of you who have experienced moving away from home to study/career!!

I am really hoping to broaden my horizons and see what more there is to offer!

Thanks all
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tilly101
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Hey, I'm from Scotland have worked extensively in Education, particularly in inclusion and I'm preparing to study my PGDE Primary this year, I'll share some experiences and my opinion, but obviously do your own research as well because each school context is different. I've had the pleasure of working in some amazing settings which I hold in high regard but if the Management or your colleagues don't click it doesn't matter where you are you'll not enjoy it, anyway...

I think Scottish education, and in particular the additional support needs community is more socially just than England, and that will make a big difference to your academic experience. As we have 'less' emphasis on testing and 'no' league tables (and I put ' ' because we obviously do have these pressures there just not as prominent as in England, in my opinion), we provide a more inclusive education, there seems to be more flexibility when it comes to supporting pupils and our curriculum is designed to be child led. I think I personally would find it less frustrating to work in Scotland with children with Additional Support Needs, there is a lot of support, collaborative working between health, social and education are improving all the time and I fond the profession is considered really valuable. Some places in England have got a really bad reputation for excluding SEN pupils and not supporting them at all and I feel that that is a cultural thing engrained in the education system down there. (I've not worked in England so that is kind of a 'one size fits all' stereotype, I know several teachers who work in England and I'd consider them amazing teachers! So bear that in mind)

Having worked with a gentleman who had lots of experience working with SEN in England who moved here I know he struggled to adjust to our curriculum, so if you are considering setting up shop here I would definatley consider doing you PGDE/Masters here rather than England. I also know you would have to do some kind of re-train if you came as a fully qualified teacher so that is somthing to bear in mind, you might have to take a pay cut etc..

Strathclyde do an excellent masters on inclusive education and I've heard amazing things And Edinburgh do a masters in Transformative teaching and learning which qualifies you to teach from(primary strand) Nursery to Senior 3 (reception to year 9) or (secondary strand) primary 5 to Senior 6 (year 5 to year 12) Scottish secondary schools are increasingly looking for primary teachers to support children with low levels of literacy and numercy. Hope this helps!

Ps. I went through school in England and I much prefer living in Scotland so I'm super biased!
Last edited by tilly101; 6 months ago
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tilly101
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Hey, I'm from Scotland have worked extensively in Education, particularly in inclusion and I'm preparing to study my PGDE Primary this year, I'll share some experiences and my opinion, but obviously do your own research as well because each school context is different. I've had the pleasure of working in some amazing settings which I hold in high regard but if the Management or your colleagues don't click it doesn't matter where you are you'll not enjoy it, anyway... I think scottish education, and in particular the additional support needs community is more socially just than England, and that will make a big difference to your academic experience. As we have 'less' emphasis on testing and 'no' league tables (and I put ' ' because we obviously do have these pressures there just not as prominent as in England, in my opinion), we provide a more inclusive education, there seems to be more flexibility when it comes to supporting pupils and our curriculum is designed to be child led. I think I personally would find it less frustrating to work in Scotland with children with Additional Support Needs, there is a lot of support, collaborative working between health, social and education are improving all the time and I fond the profession is considered really valuable. Some places in England have got a really bad reputation for excluding SEN pupils and not supporting them at all and I feel that that is a cultural thing engrained in the education system down there. (I've not worked in England so that is kind of a 'one size fits all' stereotype, I know several teachers who work in England and I'd consider them amazing teachers! So bear that in mind) Having worked with a gentleman who had lots of experience working with SEN in England who moved here I know he struggled to adjust to our curriculum, so if you are considering setting up shop here I would definatley consider doing you PGDE/Masters here rather than England. I also know you would have to do some kind of re-train if you came as a fully qualified teacher so that is somthing to bear in mind, you might have to take a pay cut etc.. Strathclyde do an excellent masters on inclusive education and I've heard amazing things And Edinburgh do a masters in Transformative teaching and learning which qualifies you to teach from(primary strand) Nursery to Senior 3 (reception to year 9) or (secondary strand) primary 5 to Senior 6 (year 5 to year 12) Scottish secondary schools are increasingly looking for primary teachers to support children with low levels of literacy and numercy. Hope this helps!
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