aque1408
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Why does the fact that an aldehyde has a hydrogen atom attached to the carbonyl group mean it is easily oxidised in comparison to ketones?
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Lizancol123
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As you probably know, one definition of oxidation is the removal of a hydrogen atom from a compound. The hydrogen atom in an alydehyde that is bonded to the carbonyl group is much easier to remove than any hydrogens in a ketone - removing a hydrogen from a ketone would mean breaking carbon to carbon bonds which are relatively strong in comparison to the other bond types in those compounds. I hope this makes sense and that it helps!
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Lizancol123
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This link might help: https://www.quora.com/Why-are-the-al...an-the-ketones
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mgi
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(Original post by aque1408)
Why does the fact that an aldehyde has a hydrogen atom attached to the carbonyl group mean it is easily oxidised in comparison to ketones?
electrons, charges and steric factors.! Oxidation is about electron loss, right?
Search through FunMans videos for the one about aldehyde and ketone reactivity. it is a nice 5 minute video that will help you!
https://m.youtube.com/user/nathatable
Last edited by mgi; 4 months ago
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aque1408
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Thanks everyone for helping out! I think I'm just confused about why a C-C bond needs to be broken to remove a hydrogen atom in a ketone?
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aque1408
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(Original post by mgi)
electrons, charges and steric factors.! https://m.youtube.com/user/nathatable
Hey- which video are you trying to show as the link just brings me to a YouTube channel and I can't seem to find a video called 'electrons, charges and steric factors' on that channel
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aque1408
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Thanks, the 'protected by two bulk groups' bit makes sense but I'm more confused about the whole idea of hydrogen atoms being easier to remove in aldehydes which my textbook refers to
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mgi
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(Original post by aque1408)
Hey- which video are you trying to show as the link just brings me to a YouTube channel and I can't seem to find a video called 'electrons, charges and steric factors' on that channel
Sorry, that wasnt the title. Apologies. A very good video:
https://youtu.be/Ncebtq5Yq44
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mgi
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(Original post by aque1408)
Thanks, the 'protected by two bulk groups' bit makes sense but I'm more confused about the whole idea of hydrogen atoms being easier to remove in aldehydes which my textbook refers to
I think it is easier to look at what the electrons are up to! see my other posts.
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aque1408
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(Original post by mgi)
I think it is easier to look at what the electrons are up to! see my other posts.
I just realised you've written all the posts so thank you so much for helping me out, its a big help when I don't really have access to teachers as much now!
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mgi
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(Original post by aque1408)
I just realised you've written all the posts so thank you so much for helping me out, its a big help when I don't really have access to teachers as much now!
no problem 😃👍
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