biomedical engineering universities

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kkavii
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#1
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#1
I have previously been told that to get a job in any region of engineering, it is important what university you go to as employers will look at the levels of education been given to specific candidates. Is this true ? I am looking to go to Aston or Nottingham Trent in England
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Lewis T K
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(Original post by kkavii)
I have previously been told that to get a job in any region of engineering, it is important what university you go to as employers will look at the levels of education been given to specific candidates. Is this true ? I am looking to go to Aston or Nottingham Trent in England
The answer is not necessarily. Some engineering firms prefer to employ from Russell group universities, but this elitism seems to be dwindling in the engineering industry and rightfully so. The main thing is to do well in your degree and write a dissertation that is new and innovative and proves what you as a student, and potential employee are capable of. I guess if you were to go into academia it may be more of an issue, but even then I doubt it. I know some people who are doing their PhD or DEng (professional doctorate of engineering) and have never had any issues or deterrents because of the institution they attended. Anyway most engineers go into industry rather than academia.
I am a graduate of Biomedical Engineering from the University of Glasgow, and I personally have never heard of such limitations or ultimatums in regards to the institution, unless the degree is not accredited by the Royal Academy of Engineers.

Good luck with your future study and future career
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kkavii
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Thanks for great response, thats cleared that area of question for me. I plan to go into biomedical engineering but then to specialize in rehabilitation engineering which is about the designing of prosthetics. I plan to work in industry, not in academia. What do you think about this particular feild in biomedical engineering?
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Lewis T K
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(Original post by kkavii)
Thanks for great response, thats cleared that area of question for me. I plan to go into biomedical engineering but then to specialize in rehabilitation engineering which is about the designing of prosthetics. I plan to work in industry, not in academia. What do you think about this particular feild in biomedical engineering?
This is a very good area to specialise in. With the increasing use of tissue and cell engineering and AI and deep-learning within rehabilitation engineering, jobs are going to be plentiful and very lucrative. Additionally this is good for if you would like to enter either the public sector (NHS) or the private sector. Rehabilitation engineering is quite a broad spectrum. Yes you can focus on prosthetics and orthotics, but there stuff like brain computer interfaces and functional electronic stimulation that are really interesting too definitely when combined with prosthetics and orthotics. The good thing is during your undergraduate course you will cover all the basics, then if you want to specialise in one specific subject you can through a post grad. I personally am specialising in precision oncology with biomedical engineering.
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kkavii
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oh ok, the brain computer interface sound really interesting actually, when i doing my undergraduate degree, im sure i will have a better understanding of the course and what my next steps would be. thanks for great advice .
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smallfellow
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#6
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(Original post by Lewis T K)
The answer is not necessarily. Some engineering firms prefer to employ from Russell group universities, but this elitism seems to be dwindling in the engineering industry and rightfully so. The main thing is to do well in your degree and write a dissertation that is new and innovative and proves what you as a student, and potential employee are capable of. I guess if you were to go into academia it may be more of an issue, but even then I doubt it. I know some people who are doing their PhD or DEng (professional doctorate of engineering) and have never had any issues or deterrents because of the institution they attended. Anyway most engineers go into industry rather than academia.
I am a graduate of Biomedical Engineering from the University of Glasgow, and I personally have never heard of such limitations or ultimatums in regards to the institution, unless the degree is not accredited by the Royal Academy of Engineers.

Good luck with your future study and future career

I wanted to know if I study biomedical engineering in a normal ranked university not so high will i be able to still get jobs in good companies with really high or the average salary a person studying in queens Mary earning?
These are the list of universities I could find out any suggestions?
University of Hull
Middlesex university
Ulster university
University of east London
University of Aston
Are these universities good?
And do u have suggestions for any other universities in UK that could be considered
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Lewis T K
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#7
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(Original post by smallfellow)
I wanted to know if I study biomedical engineering in a normal ranked university not so high will i be able to still get jobs in good companies with really high or the average salary a person studying in queens Mary earning?
These are the list of universities I could find out any suggestions?
University of Hull
Middlesex university
Ulster university
University of east London
University of Aston
Are these universities good?
And do u have suggestions for any other universities in UK that could be considered
Your employment potential and salary will have several variables such as classification, work experience, area of interest, publications etc, so not just your institution of study. So yes, you would likely be on a higher salary if you graduated with a First and had a year integrated work experience and a good/published dissertation from a lower tier university than if you scrapped a 3rd from a very top tier uni and none of the other requirements. As I said previously some engineering firms prefer to employ from Russell group universities, but this elitism seems to be dwindling in the engineering industry and rightfully so.
When you are looking to apply to biomedical engineering there are a few key things you should look for. First, who is the course accredited by. Second look at the course prospective, do these modules seem to interest you. Third, what kind of degree are you getting, is it a BEng (Hons) a BEng a BSc or an MEng (There are threads here on TSR already highlighting the difference between each of these). Fourthly, what are the universities links with industry, one of the reasons I chose my uni was due to its strings links with many engineering and biomedical engineering companies such as Boeing, Rolls Royce, GSK and Johnson

I am by no means an expert in biomedical engineering admissions, but some of the universities that I gravitated to were Glasgow (as I am an alumnus I am Bias ), Imperial College London, Loughborough University, The university of Strathclyde and Cambridge, due to their string links with industry and favourable course modules.

Perhaps mnot can further help you as they are far better versed in Engineering and engineering schools than myself.

Very best of luck in your application
Last edited by Lewis T K; 1 year ago
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smallfellow
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#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Lewis T K)
Your employment potential and salary will have several variables such as classification, work experience, area of interest, publications etc, so not just your institution of study. So yes, you would likely be on a higher salary if you graduated with a First and had a year integrated work experience and a good/published dissertation from a lower tier university than if you scrapped a 3rd from a very top tier uni and none of the other requirements. As I said previously some engineering firms prefer to employ from Russell group universities, but this elitism seems to be dwindling in the engineering industry and rightfully so.
When you are looking to apply to biomedical engineering there are a few key things you should look for. First, who is the course accredited by. Second look at the course prospective, do these modules seem to interest you. Third, what kind of degree are you getting, is it a BEng (Hons) a BEng a BSc or an MEng (There are threads here on TSR already highlighting the difference between each of these). Fourthly, what are the universities links with industry, one of the reasons I chose my uni was due to its strings links with many engineering and biomedical engineering companies such as Boeing, Rolls Royce, GSK and Johnson

I am by no means an expert in biomedical engineering admissions, but some of the universities that I gravitated to were Glasgow (as I am an alumnus I am Bias ), Imperial College London, Loughborough University, The university of Strathclyde and Cambridge, due to their string links with industry and favourable course modules.

Perhaps mnot can further help you as they are far better versed in Engineering and engineering schools than myself.

Very best of luck in your application
Thankyou so much for the help I’m kinda of looking into universities with a normal budget as I am an international student so there are more factors to look into that’s the only reason
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Lewis T K
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#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by smallfellow)
Thankyou so much for the help I’m kinda of looking into universities with a normal budget as I am an international student so there are more factors to look into that’s the only reason
No problem, you’re definitely doing the right thing by researching possible universities now. You should also contact universities you are thinking of to get the best possible information, attending their online open days is also a great idea.
If you have anymore questions about biomedical engineering please ask, and hopefully myself or others can answer them for you.

Best of luck
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