kkavii
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#1
I have previously been told that to get a job in any region of engineering, it is important what university you go to as employers will look at the levels of education been given to specific candidates. Is this true ? I am looking to go to Aston or Nottingham Trent in England
0
reply
Lewis T K
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 months ago
#2
(Original post by kkavii)
I have previously been told that to get a job in any region of engineering, it is important what university you go to as employers will look at the levels of education been given to specific candidates. Is this true ? I am looking to go to Aston or Nottingham Trent in England
The answer is not necessarily. Some engineering firms prefer to employ from Russell group universities, but this elitism seems to be dwindling in the engineering industry and rightfully so. The main thing is to do well in your degree and write a dissertation that is new and innovative and proves what you as a student, and potential employee are capable of. I guess if you were to go into academia it may be more of an issue, but even then I doubt it. I know some people who are doing their PhD or DEng (professional doctorate of engineering) and have never had any issues or deterrents because of the institution they attended. Anyway most engineers go into industry rather than academia.
I am a graduate of Biomedical Engineering from the University of Glasgow, and I personally have never heard of such limitations or ultimatums in regards to the institution, unless the degree is not accredited by the Royal Academy of Engineers.

Good luck with your future study and future career
1
reply
kkavii
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#3
Thanks for great response, thats cleared that area of question for me. I plan to go into biomedical engineering but then to specialize in rehabilitation engineering which is about the designing of prosthetics. I plan to work in industry, not in academia. What do you think about this particular feild in biomedical engineering?
0
reply
Lewis T K
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 months ago
#4
(Original post by kkavii)
Thanks for great response, thats cleared that area of question for me. I plan to go into biomedical engineering but then to specialize in rehabilitation engineering which is about the designing of prosthetics. I plan to work in industry, not in academia. What do you think about this particular feild in biomedical engineering?
This is a very good area to specialise in. With the increasing use of tissue and cell engineering and AI and deep-learning within rehabilitation engineering, jobs are going to be plentiful and very lucrative. Additionally this is good for if you would like to enter either the public sector (NHS) or the private sector. Rehabilitation engineering is quite a broad spectrum. Yes you can focus on prosthetics and orthotics, but there stuff like brain computer interfaces and functional electronic stimulation that are really interesting too definitely when combined with prosthetics and orthotics. The good thing is during your undergraduate course you will cover all the basics, then if you want to specialise in one specific subject you can through a post grad. I personally am specialising in precision oncology with biomedical engineering.
0
reply
kkavii
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#5
oh ok, the brain computer interface sound really interesting actually, when i doing my undergraduate degree, im sure i will have a better understanding of the course and what my next steps would be. thanks for great advice .
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (64)
65.98%
I don't have everything I need (33)
34.02%

Watched Threads

View All