14ahussain
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Hi
I believe I have APT and I know I have to strengthen my abs and glutes and also stretch out the tight hip flexors. However does nutrition play a role? Do I still have to eat protein and carbs as if I was on a strengthening program, or would it be fine to eat whatever ?
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M_ichael
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I wouldn't believe it would as it's primarily concerning the alignment of the pelvis and bone structure. Although, i'll take a willm speculation and say foods rich in calcium (and possibly protein) , which strengthens bones & support healthy bone growth, would make the process slightly easier as it fixes pain. But no, it's not essential.
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Cambrian80
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Hi, medically speaking, APT is not a 'thing'. I.e. there isn't a right or wrong way for you pelvis to be aligned. Everyone has a slightly different alignment between their spine and pelvis giving everyone a slightly different posture, but (despite what the gym bros say) there is nothing bad about being in the more APT category. It isn't going to cause you any problems when exercising or in life generally. Stretching/strengthening are not going to make any difference to the structural alignment of your bones, so they really aren't worth the effort. So, carry on exercising and enjoying life without worrying about APT!
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14ahussain
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(Original post by Cambrian80)
Hi, medically speaking, APT is not a 'thing'. I.e. there isn't a right or wrong way for you pelvis to be aligned. Everyone has a slightly different alignment between their spine and pelvis giving everyone a slightly different posture, but (despite what the gym bros say) there is nothing bad about being in the more APT category. It isn't going to cause you any problems when exercising or in life generally. Stretching/strengthening are not going to make any difference to the structural alignment of your bones, so they really aren't worth the effort. So, carry on exercising and enjoying life without worrying about APT!
Wait hold on, if there isn’t a way to correct it then firstly how did people do it from the results on Google?
Secondly if APT is mainly to do with the hip muscles, I’m sure we can stretch it and reverse the posture, can’t we?
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Cambrian80
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Hi, on your first point - unfortunately most of the information you'll find from a Google search is of very poor quality and will typically come from a source who will firstly tell you that APT is bad (it isn't, other than in terms of subjective aesthetics) and that they have the "one weird trick" that will cure it. It is possible to rotate your pelvis into a more posterior position by consciously squeezing your abs and glutes. If it's really important to you, you could probably train yourself to reduce the APT by focusing on contracting these muscles to the extent that you eventually do it as a matter of course.

On the second point, the problem is APT isn't caused by your hip muscles being "tight" - the muscles/bones/ligaments etc. in your pelvis are all in a normal position, it just happens to be in a position that some people have given the label "APT" and will say isn't aesthetically pleasing. Stretching in general does very little, and is highly unlikely to make any difference here.

I've linked a couple of articles that might be of interest if you want some more information on this. Hope it helps!

https://www.painscience.com/articles/posture.php
https://www.painscience.com/articles/stretching.php
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