stephanieg1992
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#81
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#81
(Original post by RedWarrioress)
That's a good idea, I'll do that...I know this year it may be a bit different because of the old Covid situation so hopefully they'll be more flexible with school experience.
They absolutely will be; I was told as much during my interview (my uni highly recommended getting some school experience after you got a place but before you started, but obviously were aware it wouldn't happen this year!). They're being very flexible with the actual PGCE course, never mind the applications, so I wouldn't worry too much- but if contacting the uni gives you some reassurance, definitely do it!
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Arianax
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#82
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(Original post by JamThatJam)
As it's getting towards the end of this academic year,I wanted to start a thread just to chat to other people hoping to start a teacher training application for a September 2021 start. I want to do a School Direct Primary and I'm currently in contact with an advisor from Get into Teaching and in the process of writing my personal statement.

Here's just a little bit of information about me:
I am currently studying Education Studies at the University of Hertfordshire and have just finished my second year. I have been doing voluntary work at a primary school for just over 2½ years. I'm also doing part time work as a group leader at a holiday camp .

How is everyone getting on with their applications? I would love to know and meet others who are on the same boat as me
Hello, I have literally just finished my personal statement. My get into teaching advisor has checked it 3 times, it's all ready to be sent off.

I've chosen the 4 places I want to apply too. I know UCAS takes only 3 choices, but 1 of the university's I've chosen I can apply directly to them without using UCAS.

Also the university's I'm applying to arrange the placement in primary school, but I am worried it may be too far. Could I find a placement myself in a local primary school? Will they accept this? Just worried about this!

I've done placements before in my local primary school, when I was at secondary school and during my level 3 diploma.
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bluebeetle
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#83
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#83
(Original post by Arianax)
Hello, I have literally just finished my personal statement. My get into teaching advisor has checked it 3 times, it's all ready to be sent off.

I've chosen the 4 places I want to apply too. I know UCAS takes only 3 choices, but 1 of the university's I've chosen I can apply directly to them without using UCAS.

Also the university's I'm applying to arrange the placement in primary school, but I am worried it may be too far. Could I find a placement myself in a local primary school? Will they accept this? Just worried about this!

I've done placements before in my local primary school, when I was at secondary school and during my level 3 diploma.
Typically, you should aim to do your teacher training as close to where you live as possible so that you can commute. If you don't have access to a car or if you have childcare commitments, training providers will often take this into account as much as they can, but they are still limited by the schools who they have ready to take trainees.

I don't expect you would be able to organise your own placement, I've not heard of anybody doing this. Hosting a trainee is quite an involved process for the school, so even if they take volunteers, they may not have the capacity to take a trainee. If you would really like to do a placement at a local school, the best thing to do would be to contact local schools and see if they are already attached to a teacher training provider.

You will also need to do a second placement at a different school anyway, so you wouldn't be able to be at one local school the whole year.
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Arianax
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#84
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
Typically, you should aim to do your teacher training as close to where you live as possible so that you can commute. If you don't have access to a car or if you have childcare commitments, training providers will often take this into account as much as they can, but they are still limited by the schools who they have ready to take trainees.

I don't expect you would be able to organise your own placement, I've not heard of anybody doing this. Hosting a trainee is quite an involved process for the school, so even if they take volunteers, they may not have the capacity to take a trainee. If you would really like to do a placement at a local school, the best thing to do would be to contact local schools and see if they are already attached to a teacher training provider.

You will also need to do a second placement at a different school anyway, so you wouldn't be able to be at one local school the whole year.
Thank you for the advice 😊

I have loads of local primary schools near me, I can try securing a placement with them!

I don’t mind emailing and reaching out to them to see what they say, worst is a no and I can just do placement at the school my university has found me!

I have my driving licence and I can buy a car, but would rather avoid that until I start earning money as they’re so expensive to run etc. But, if it came down to it I can buy a car.

I will try speaking to uni, see what they say and hopefully find a local primary school.

My Mum went to a farish uni and they found her a local placement. She can drive too.

Either way, it’s fine. I’ll just have to suck it up and buy a car 😂
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Rebeccacbray
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#85
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#85
Hiya,

I'm looking at applying to train for postgraduate 2021 but I am unsure what route. I was initially going to do the salaried school led route, however I am unsure on how the workload will be and if i will even be allowed entrance due to the covid situation.

I was going to go this route as i would be paid and I wouldn't have to pay £9000 to train for a year.

What other routes are people doing?
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Arianax
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#86
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#86
(Original post by Rebeccacbray)
Hiya,

I'm looking at applying to train for postgraduate 2021 but I am unsure what route. I was initially going to do the salaried school led route, however I am unsure on how the workload will be and if i will even be allowed entrance due to the covid situation.

I was going to go this route as i would be paid and I wouldn't have to pay £9000 to train for a year.

What other routes are people doing?
I think I’m going to opt for the PGCE one. I prefer that one.

You don’t have to pay £9,000 to train yes, but I’ll be using Student Finance to fund my route.

Depending on what you want to teach there is a bursary available.

Contact Get Into Teaching, you will be given a teaching advisor and they’ll help you with your application process/personal statement.

Applications open 13th October, so be quick! As some courses can get filled up very quickly.
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RedWarrioress
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#87
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#87
(Original post by Rebeccacbray)
Hiya,

I'm looking at applying to train for postgraduate 2021 but I am unsure what route. I was initially going to do the salaried school led route, however I am unsure on how the workload will be and if i will even be allowed entrance due to the covid situation.

I was going to go this route as i would be paid and I wouldn't have to pay £9000 to train for a year.

What other routes are people doing?
Hi!
I'm trying for Schools Direct, applying for student finance for my fees and then use the bursary for my living expenses. Although there's still uni days, I've already done 5 years of uni, I'd like some practical time!
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JamThatJam
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#88
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#88
(Original post by Rebeccacbray)
Hiya,

I'm looking at applying to train for postgraduate 2021 but I am unsure what route. I was initially going to do the salaried school led route, however I am unsure on how the workload will be and if i will even be allowed entrance due to the covid situation.

I was going to go this route as i would be paid and I wouldn't have to pay £9000 to train for a year.

What other routes are people doing?
I'm also looking at doing the School Direct route. These routes tend to place you in schools from September-July. A lot of the School Direct routes that I've looked at place you in school for 3-4 days a week and give you 1 day a week at university (if the route offers PGCE as well). As you're a member of the school from the beginning, you will have to adapt to the life of the school a lot quicker than you would on the PGCE route. Some SCITTs also offer salaried routes. From what I've heard, the salaried routes have a lot more of an intense workload (school-based), than an unsalaried/university led route would offer. A lot of providers are will still recruiting for 2021/22. Hope this helps!
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SarcAndSpark
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#89
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#89
(Original post by Rebeccacbray)
Hiya,

I'm looking at applying to train for postgraduate 2021 but I am unsure what route. I was initially going to do the salaried school led route, however I am unsure on how the workload will be and if i will even be allowed entrance due to the covid situation.

I was going to go this route as i would be paid and I wouldn't have to pay £9000 to train for a year.

What other routes are people doing?
Salaried schools direct routes tend to be quite competitive and limited to those who have significant experience in schools (e.g. as a TA) already.

However, it's always worth applying and seeing what happens- if you get rejected you can always apply to non-salaried routes via apply 2.
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RedWarrioress
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#90
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Here's a question, I don't know if someone here can answer but what tends to be more competitive: PGCE or schools direct (non-salaried)?
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Arianax
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#91
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#91
(Original post by RedWarrioress)
Here's a question, I don't know if someone here can answer but what tends to be more competitive: PGCE or schools direct (non-salaried)?
PGCE because I don’t want to work a whole year for free (unless I’m mistaken). I’d rather do placement and learn from the actual class teacher.

I’m wanting to do primary, which is very competitive as it is hence no bursary available.
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RedWarrioress
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#92
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(Original post by Arianax)
PGCE because I don’t want to work a whole year for free (unless I’m mistaken). I’d rather do placement and learn from the actual class teacher.

I’m wanting to do primary, which is very competitive as it is hence no bursary available.
It absolutely baffles me that there's no bursary for it, I know it's a competitive area but teaching overall is in need!
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Arianax
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(Original post by RedWarrioress)
It absolutely baffles me that there's no bursary for it, I know it's a competitive area but teaching overall is in need!
Primary school teachers aren’t needed, it’s oversubscribed. Secondary school teachers are needed as they’re undersubscribed, hence bursary to entice people to come into teaching.
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Trotter.JJ_496_
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#94
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Hi Everyone!
I'm looking to apply for 2022 entry, but haven't decided whether I want to do primary or secondary. Does anyone know if you can do a School Direct/SCITT and still be able to do a specialism subject for primary? Also, if you're doing secondary, does your degree have to be in the subject that you want to teach?
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bluebeetle
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#95
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#95
(Original post by Trotter.JJ_496_)
Hi Everyone!
I'm looking to apply for 2022 entry, but haven't decided whether I want to do primary or secondary. Does anyone know if you can do a School Direct/SCITT and still be able to do a specialism subject for primary? Also, if you're doing secondary, does your degree have to be in the subject that you want to teach?
For secondary, it will depend on the training provider. Many ask for at least 50% of degree content to be related to the subject, but others are more relaxed on that. I know my SCITT was very relaxed about degree subject, so long as people showed a willingness to learn and an interest in the subject they were applying for. I think generally applying without a relevant degree is easier if the subject is in demand - like maths or physics.
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RedWarrioress
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#96
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(Original post by Trotter.JJ_496_)
Hi Everyone!
I'm looking to apply for 2022 entry, but haven't decided whether I want to do primary or secondary. Does anyone know if you can do a School Direct/SCITT and still be able to do a specialism subject for primary? Also, if you're doing secondary, does your degree have to be in the subject that you want to teach?
Yep you can absolutely do SCITT and Schools Direct in primary, one of the alliances I'm looking at have a group of primary schools I there.
Regarding secondary, the general 'rule' is the subject you want to teach should be 50% of your degree. For example, if you did History and English joint honours you could probably do either of those subjects. I personally did Archaeology at both BA and MA and have been told that's fine for history because it's very closely related.
Hope that helps.
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SarcAndSpark
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#97
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#97
(Original post by Trotter.JJ_496_)
Hi Everyone!
I'm looking to apply for 2022 entry, but haven't decided whether I want to do primary or secondary. Does anyone know if you can do a School Direct/SCITT and still be able to do a specialism subject for primary? Also, if you're doing secondary, does your degree have to be in the subject that you want to teach?
Some SCITTs will offer PGCEs with specialisms for primary, but it is rarer than PGCEs through a uni. I'm not sure about schools direct.

For secondary, your degree usually has to have 50% content relevant to the subject you want to teach, but there are SKEs for shortage subjects as well- it really depends on what subject you want to teach!

Ideally, you'd get experience in both types of school to help you decide!
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watbrif1
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#98
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Just a quick question on the PGDE: I didn't go to school in Scotland (or in the UK...), so this confuses me - I know that there's the CfE and all that, but to what extent is there a "national curriculum"? Most of the interview advise given includes the hint that one should know the curriculum in the chosen subject (although I feel this might be with England in mind). I've found the course content for the national qualifications in my subject here (https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/47924.html), but it would be good to know what exactly about the curriculum will be asked in an interview - there seems to be a lot of leeway for schools to decide what they actually want to teach.

Would it be a good idea to purchase some textbooks (especially for the S1-3 area) or would this be over the top?
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by watbrif1)
Just a quick question on the PGDE: I didn't go to school in Scotland (or in the UK...), so this confuses me - I know that there's the CfE and all that, but to what extent is there a "national curriculum"? Most of the interview advise given includes the hint that one should know the curriculum in the chosen subject (although I feel this might be with England in mind). I've found the course content for the national qualifications in my subject here (https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/47924.html), but it would be good to know what exactly about the curriculum will be asked in an interview - there seems to be a lot of leeway for schools to decide what they actually want to teach.

Would it be a good idea to purchase some textbooks (especially for the S1-3 area) or would this be over the top?
I do think buying textbooks at this stage will be overkill, but I think it would be a good idea to familiarise yourself with the key documents here: https://education.gov.scot/education...riculum-areas/

In England, for science I was asked a question about the curriculum at every interview (One was if I would take anything off the curriculum, I can't remember the other two). I think that showing you know what is on the curriculum is pretty important!
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watbrif1
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I do think buying textbooks at this stage will be overkill, but I think it would be a good idea to familiarise yourself with the key documents here: https://education.gov.scot/education...riculum-areas/

In England, for science I was asked a question about the curriculum at every interview (One was if I would take anything off the curriculum, I can't remember the other two). I think that showing you know what is on the curriculum is pretty important!
I hadn't seen that link for some odd reason, thanks for pointing it out!
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