Name the 3 most important books you’ve ever read and why?

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GoogGooglyMoogly
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I’ve started this thread because why not. I’ll go first:

1. TuPac Shakurs “The rose who grew from the concrete poetry collection”: I read this books during Year 5 and immediately I was captivated at his poetic style and how great poetry could be he weaved good stories and more importantly set in motion my desire to read and write poetry which has served as a useful vice in my life and has helped me academically. I consider myself a rose who grew from the concrete in a dark room.

2. Oliver Sacks’ “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”: I read this during the summer of year 12 it was incredible. Each case vibrantly detailed and explained that even a complete noob like me could understand. His books were more than case study but philosophy and psychology and A.R. Luria name drops. I went on from this to read much more of his books and he played a key factor into why I want to study Psychology.

3. Adam Kay’s “This is going to hurt”: I got this for Christmas in 2018 and was the best present I’ve ever received to this day. I’ve always been fascinated by the medical profession from a young age. I see it as an honour to be able to dedicate your life to helping others and ease their worries. I’ve always wanted to be in the NHS but upon reading this book I gained a new found appreciation for just how life is for a doctor. Yes it’s what I thought but he outlines more than just the hard life in the wards but he tells of the outside effects. You become a doctor and you’re thrust into a vocation that demands 120% of your attention and sometimes it may be hard. And the ending broke me as it should’ve. I’ve spoken to my cousins who are doctors about this stuff and they tell me similar stories and through hearing and reading I gained an appreciation at just how hard a job being a doctor is. I still want to work i. the NHS as a Psychiatrist/Therapist/Clinical Psychologist but I feel more understanding of the demands and issues within these professions.

Well that’s my 3 what’s yours?
Last edited by GoogGooglyMoogly; 1 month ago
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GoogGooglyMoogly
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Bump?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by GoogGooglyMoogly)
Bump?
That is not so easy to choice the three best books, if people like me read so many of them. All the more you demand to reason the choice. Give me a long break to think about.
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Kallisto
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As promised, I am back and here are my top 3:

100 Years of Solitude: Marquez's well known novel has a magic touch to tell the story of the Buendia family tree in hundreds years from the foundation of a village to the very bitter end, at the same time his writing is a remember of Columbias history whose parts are good emphasized even ordinary readers can understand. One of the best books they exist.

Night Train to Lisbon: A swiss teacher for classic languages (ancient Greek and Latin) encounters a Portugiese young women on a bridge when he is on his way to the school, found a book she carried on with her. When he translated and read it, he was so impressed by the powerful and fantastic words that he wants to know what was behind the life of the author. That is why he is going to Portugal all of a sudden to speak with remained friends and family members, not only to get the life of the author out, but also in what a time he grown up in Salazar time. Absolutely readable!

In eighty days around the world: A superb classic about the Gentlemen Philas Fogg who bet on to cross the world in eighty days to win. What I appreciate are the adventures Mr. Fogg and his accomodation Passpartout get into and the way they are written feels like the reader is really in the middle of the journeys. An absolute recommendation!

Quick-use and Michiyo what are yours?
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Halfeti Rose
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It is very difficult to pick out three from my list but I will just drop the top ones that pops on my brain...

The Shiva Trilogy by Amish Tripati This book tops my list because it made me question many things about life.. Made me redo my choices and taught me many trivial things which I have never given a thought about before.. This is a magnificent fantasy novel and I would recommend it to anyone!!

Delirium by Lauren Oliver This book is one of the best dystopian fiction trilogy and is really worth a read.. I was quite fascinated by the world the author has created and loved the protagonists thoughts... A high recommendation from my side.

Breaking the Bad Boy by Wattpad author This book is from Wattpad but I wanted to put this up in my list because this book played with my emotions.. A very strong book and for anyone who is dealing with grief or anything I highly recommend you this.. It tugged my heart with each chapter.. A strong recommendation again..

Good Luck Reading!!
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Michiyo
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(Original post by Kallisto)
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Thank you for the tag! :hugs:

1. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
This book captured my heart. It became my favourite book ever instantly and I was impressed by the psychological and philosophical elements, as well as by the overall execution of the plot. I do not usually read books this long, but I loved this one so much that I could not stop reading it (no joke, I even took it with me to lectures). Upon reading it, I became more motivated to write and master the art of writing, especially when it comes to emotions, just like the author. If I ever learn Russian, I will definitely reread it in its original language.

2. No Longer Human by Osamu Dazai
Reading No Longer Human hurt, it really did, but it is such a fascinating tale that I loved every second of it. It was important to me as it helped me refine my understanding of humans and the complex relationships between them while telling an interesting story which captivated me from start to finish. One day when I am fluent in Japanese, I hope to read this beautiful book in its original language to better grasp the subtleties of the language used.

3. Understanding International Relations by Chris Brown and Kirsten Ainley
To me, this book was important because it was the final drop which assured me that studying International Relations was for me. I was already 99% sure, but this book convinced me 100%. While reading it, I loved it so much that I spent hours pacing around the room with a happy smile on my face, up in my own world where I analysed and criticised the political theories mentioned in the book. The pure elation I got from the reassurance that I was not going down the wrong path made this a truly worthwhile read.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Michiyo)
Thank you for the tag! :hugs:

1. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
This book captured my heart. It became my favourite book ever instantly and I was impressed by the psychological and philosophical elements, as well as by the overall execution of the plot. I do not usually read books this long, but I loved this one so much that I could not stop reading it (no joke, I even took it with me to lectures). Upon reading it, I became more motivated to write and master the art of writing, especially when it comes to emotions, just like the author. If I ever learn Russian, I will definitely reread it in its original language.
(...)
You are welcome! I know that you will like it. Crime and Punishment is one of these books I have on my reading list for so long. It is time to get it at all costs.
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Sinnoh
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Factfulness by Hans Rosling - I think that the world would be noticeably improved by everyone reading this.

The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy (and subsequent books in the series) by Douglas Adams - These books have been influential for my own kind of humour.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley - I read it for GCSE, but looking back on it it's such an interesting book. There's so much more to it than just the classic trope that I'm glad I got to know the full story.

Honourable mentions

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller - bloody hilarious with humour that I also somewhat adopted
Down And Out In Paris And London by George Orwell - not sure why but it really stuck with me. And it makes me seriously appreciate things like... basic labour regulations.
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess - I think the impact of it is greater when you're younger. Alex is what, 15? Can you imagine some year 10 doing all the crap he did?
Last edited by Sinnoh; 1 month ago
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GoogGooglyMoogly
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It’s been so cool reading about those books! I’ve added a few to my reading list for the rest of the year!
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