momina.u
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#1
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I was thinking about doing Psychology at university because I'm passionate about it and I'm predicted A* at a level. However, I dont think there are many careers psychology degree could lead me to without having to do extra years in education in order to actually get a job. Any advice or knowledge anyone thinks they could give me to guide me?
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joerickard
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(Original post by momina.u)
I was thinking about doing Psychology at university because I'm passionate about it and I'm predicted A* at a level. However, I dont think there are many careers psychology degree could lead me to without having to do extra years in education in order to actually get a job. Any advice or knowledge anyone thinks they could give me to guide me?
Hey! I've just accepted my offer to study psychology at Swansea this year and I'm so excited. I'm the same, I just love the subject, and I think it's really important to go for something you are passionate about. My mum is a doctor in clinical psychology and she has inspired me my whole life with the incredible ways she has been able to help people get through really dark times, and I think it's a great way to live a meaningful life helping others. Academic research is really fascinating too if you want to get into that sort of thing and you're committed enough.

As far as jobs go, my mum was talking about this assistant psychologist thing they are going to be introducing in the next few years in which people with a bachelors in psychology can get a full time position without as much academic experience because they are in need of people who can fulfil this kind of role, but they don't necessarily need PhDs and stuff on top. She did say, however, that you need a high 2:1 to be considered for a lot of the jobs in psychology because it's competitive. But the thing is, everything is competitive these days, and it's better to go for something you love, and if you put your mind to it and get a great degree you are sure to excel. It is a big decision though, so just take your time deciding and explore all your options
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momina.u
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#3
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(Original post by joerickard)
Hey! I've just accepted my offer to study psychology at Swansea this year and I'm so excited. I'm the same, I just love the subject, and I think it's really important to go for something you are passionate about. My mum is a doctor in clinical psychology and she has inspired me my whole life with the incredible ways she has been able to help people get through really dark times, and I think it's a great way to live a meaningful life helping others. Academic research is really fascinating too if you want to get into that sort of thing and you're committed enough.

As far as jobs go, my mum was talking about this assistant psychologist thing they are going to be introducing in the next few years in which people with a bachelors in psychology can get a full time position without as much academic experience because they are in need of people who can fulfil this kind of role, but they don't necessarily need PhDs and stuff on top. She did say, however, that you need a high 2:1 to be considered for a lot of the jobs in psychology because it's competitive. But the thing is, everything is competitive these days, and it's better to go for something you love, and if you put your mind to it and get a great degree you are sure to excel. It is a big decision though, so just take your time deciding and explore all your options
Thank you so much for your reply. I just feel that because I dont do any science Alevels, just psychology, there are even fewer careers I can get into with a psychology degree. I will definitely think about it though, thank you for your help.
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bones-mccoy
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#4
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The British Psychological Society website is a good starting place for looking at psychology careers

https://www.bps.org.uk/public/become-psychologist
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Nerol
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(Original post by momina.u)
I was thinking about doing Psychology at university because I'm passionate about it and I'm predicted A* at a level. However, I dont think there are many careers psychology degree could lead me to without having to do extra years in education in order to actually get a job. Any advice or knowledge anyone thinks they could give me to guide me?
Hey!

If you want to go into a career in psychology, you will need to study at postgraduate level, possibly up to doctorate level. However, there are alternatives.

Another poster mentioned the assistant psychologist roles. While you can get one of these after a BSc, they are extremely competitive and you won't be considered without relevant work experience. I applied for dozens of these jobs, got 1 interview (the most intense interview of my life!) and didn't get the job - I have a first class BSc in psychology, a counselling qualification and 3 years of mental health experience). The BSc is the base requirement for these roles, but experience is key!

If it's more the helping side you are interested in, you could also look into counselling and psychotherapy - you don't technically need a degree to do this! It does still involve several years of training, but it's another option if that's the kind of thing you want to do.

You could also go on to train as an educational psychologist, health psychologist or forensic psychologist. You could do a PhD and go into research or teaching. You could do a professional doctorate to become a counselling psychologist or clinical psychologist.

Ultimately, a career in psychology will involve a few years of study, but there are relevant jobs you can do while you study: work in mental health, research assistant, support worker etc. Volunteer work can be a helpful step, too.. eg. I volunteered as a psychology research assistant and case worker for ex-offenders. I now work as a complex case worker for people with drug and alcohol addictions while I complete my MSc.

If you are passionate about it and want a career in psychology, go for it! It's hard work, but I've loved every step.
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Nerol
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#6
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(Original post by talyia100)
it all sounds amazing. what counselling qualification do you have?
I just have my level 3 at the moment, I'm going back to do my level 4 in September to become a qualified counsellor. I eventually plan to do the counselling psychology doctorate.
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