grace10101
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Am I correct in saying that the operating system is responsible for file management which allows the user to delete move and duplicate files, it also sorts the files into a hierarchal structure so its easier for the user to find a certain file?
I saw something on bbc bitesize that said that the file handling software allows the user to these things but I just don't understand that
any help would be greatly appreciated
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InspiredPleb
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Hey there ! As with a lot of BBC Bitesize content, this is correct and to the level that you need for the GCSE.

From your post, I'm assuming you know this is pretty much all you need about this aspect of the OS for the exam, but want more information so you can understand how this works. Therefore, I don't think any of the below will need to be remembered. It's just here if you're interested!

(disclaimer: I'm not an expert and not taking CS at A Level , just someone who took it at GCSE like you and still has a passion for the subject and wants to learn more. Maybe asking your teacher through email would be a good idea? )

To my understanding....

An OS has this file management software pre - installed on to it. If every file on the computer were stored in one place, it would soon take forever to browse through the contents of that place - a computer can easily have 10,000 files or more, even if it's never been used before. So, we need to manage our files effectively.

Therefore, just like folders are places in which you can store paper files to keep them organized and easy find, data folders are divisions of a data storage device (like a hard disk or a USB drive) into which you can sort files.

All storage devices have a "first" folder, known as the root directory (if you're running Microsoft, an example would be C:\.) . All folders created are subfolders / subdirectories of this root folder. A collection of files is a file directory. The directory contains information about the files, including the type of the different files, their names, and the dates they were last accessed. Much of this information, especially that is concerned with storage, is managed by the operating system. The directory is itself a file, accessible by various file management routines.

It's by accessing a directory we can do the things you mentioned to files (e.g. search for / create / delete a file) , as the directory contains those bits of file information.

If you need anything further explained or certain parts are confusing, feel free to ask me for clarification or another more qualified user, haha!

- edit: I realise how hard it must be for you as a GCSE student right now to revise things. If you're doing the same exam board as I did, OCR, I'd be happy to help. Then again, there should be a lot of people on here that would be happy to do the same, as OCR is a popular exam board. Stay strong!
Last edited by InspiredPleb; 4 months ago
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grace10101
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(Original post by InspiredPleb)
Hey there ! As with a lot of BBC Bitesize content, this is correct and to the level that you need for the GCSE.

From your post, I'm assuming you know this is pretty much all you need about this aspect of the OS for the exam, but want more information so you can understand how this works. Therefore, I don't think any of the below will need to be remembered. It's just here if you're interested!

(disclaimer: I'm not an expert and not taking CS at A Level , just someone who took it at GCSE like you and still has a passion for the subject and wants to learn more. Maybe asking your teacher through email would be a good idea? )

To my understanding....

An OS has this file management software pre - installed on to it. If every file on the computer were stored in one place, it would soon take forever to browse through the contents of that place - a computer can easily have 10,000 files or more, even if it's never been used before. So, we need to manage our files effectively.

Therefore, just like folders are places in which you can store paper files to keep them organized and easy find, data folders are divisions of a data storage device (like a hard disk or a USB drive) into which you can sort files.

All storage devices have a "first" folder, known as the root directory (if you're running Microsoft, an example would be C:\.) . All folders created are subfolders / subdirectories of this root folder. A collection of files is a file directory. The directory contains information about the files, including the type of the different files, their names, and the dates they were last accessed. Much of this information, especially that is concerned with storage, is managed by the operating system. The directory is itself a file, accessible by various file management routines.

It's by accessing a directory we can do the things you mentioned to files (e.g. search for / create / delete a file) , as the directory contains those bits of file information.

If you need anything further explained or certain parts are confusing, feel free to ask me for clarification or another more qualified user, haha!

- edit: I realise how hard it must be for you as a GCSE student right now to revise things. If you're doing the same exam board as I did, OCR, I'd be happy to help. Then again, there should be a lot of people on here that would be happy to do the same, as OCR is a popular exam board. Stay strong!
Thank you sooo much for your reply. I sometimes feel like I need to know more about a subject to properly understand it so now I know more about how the user is able to search and delete files so thank you Revision write now is quite hard mainly because it takes a lot of motivation but luckily there are so many great revision videos, books and people on here to help. I did email my teacher and your write as she also said that for GCSE thats as much as I would need to know.

When you talked about storing files so there easier to find on a hard drive disk would that mean storing them in a certain sector of the disk that would be next to each other?
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