Studying abroad in US - any advice?

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Anonymous #1
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I'm planning on taking a gap year after the summer break when I graduate and afterwards probably go to uni. Always wanted to study abroad and currently have the US in mind. Where I'm from we have a total different school system and I have heard about you guys use a level system to get into uni? How does that work?
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Anonymous #2
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Buy a bulletproof vest? Oh and always clutch no matter the situation - 5 vs 1 😎
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jger_rams2019
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm planning on taking a gap year after the summer break when I graduate and afterwards probably go to uni. Always wanted to study abroad and currently have the US in mind. Where I'm from we have a total different school system and I have heard about you guys use a level system to get into uni? How does that work?
Hi anon, I formally worked in a U.S. university admissions office (I'm American) and would be happy to answer a few of your questions.

First off, applying as an international student varies at each college in the U.S. because you apply to individual colleges instead of using a common application like in the UK. We do have a common application that includes many universities- especially state schools, but most people apply individually because some of their choices aren't on the common app. So I encourage you to pick your 5+ colleges that you are interested in studying with and read up on their specific admissions policies.

U.S. students most frequently get accepted into college using their high school GPA (along with a personal statement and letters of rec). There are additional things that bolster the application to make it more competitive, including AP scores and extracurriculars, which the US values much more than the UK it seems. If you apply as an international applicant your GCSE's and A-levels (if applicable) will be evaluated to decide your academic competitiveness just like they would at home. However, since A-levels are like the equivalent to U.S. community college, you only need your GCSEs and AS to apply at most universities (excluding the Ivy's that frequently ask for A-level results). Our university gave you college credit for A-level grades B and above, so if you have already done them they don't necessarily go to waste.

Lastly, some colleges require international students to take our standardized tests like the SAT or the ACT, and others do not. So again, you will have to look into whether or not you need to do those before applying.
Last edited by jger_rams2019; 5 months ago
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