oufoufoufouf
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Hey, recently I have become bilingual/ near bilingual in French, and my parents aren't French. Is there anyone who wants to talk with me in French and is about my age (I'm 14)? My speaking skills are worse than my writing and that because I can't speak at home or to anyone in my year in French. thanks
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redmeercat
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Try using HelloTalk or Tandem (apps) - just remember not give give out personal info, and to edit what can be seen on your profile
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oufoufoufouf
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I can't, firstly I'm out of storage😂 and secondly my parents wouldn't let me...
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Jeparlepas
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(Original post by hffhgghhghg)
Hey, recently I have become bilingual/ near bilingual in French, and my parents aren't French. Is there anyone who wants to talk with me in French and is about my age (I'm 14)? My speaking skills are worse than my writing and that because I can't speak at home or to anyone in my year in French. thanks
Ok but how have you become fluent without French parents? Drop some tips because I really want to become fluent too but don't know how.
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oufoufoufouf
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ok sure, I'll PM you
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Kerzen
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Hi

I'm not sure that you could really describe yourself as bi-lingual. It would be well nigh impossible for someone of your age to be bi-lingual if they didn't have French speaking parents or they lived in a Francophone country. I read French at University as part of a Joint Honours BA, so I've met a few bi-lingual people.

You do sound like a keen student of French, though. Could your parents help you with something like this?

https://maryglasgowplus.com/subscribe/french
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Kerzen)
Hi

I'm not sure that you could really describe yourself as bi-lingual. It would be well nigh impossible for someone of your age to be bi-lingual if they didn't have French speaking parents or they lived in a Francophone country. I read French at University as part of a Joint Honours BA, so I've met a few bi-lingual people.

You do sound like a keen student of French, though. Could your parents help you with something like this?

https://maryglasgowplus.com/subscribe/french
The term 'bilingual' is subjective. Some people consider themselves bilingual if they know a few sentences in another language, while for others bilingual as something you can only achieve if you are native-like in both languages.
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oufoufoufouf
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my French teacher says I'm fluent in French and I always get over 90, I got 99 as my best on an a level paper. and thanks for the link, but I my school subscribes to that already and I used to get the chez nous one but then I got a bit bored because it wasn't really challenging. I go to the bilingual club and everything and I'm going to do the bilingual IB so idk, but thanks for the info!
(Original post by Kerzen)
Hi

I'm not sure that you could really describe yourself as bi-lingual. It would be well nigh impossible for someone of your age to be bi-lingual if they didn't have French speaking parents or they lived in a Francophone country. I read French at University as part of a Joint Honours BA, so I've met a few bi-lingual people.

You do sound like a keen student of French, though. Could your parents help you with something like this?

https://maryglasgowplus.com/subscribe/french
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Kerzen
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
The term 'bilingual' is subjective. Some people consider themselves bilingual if they know a few sentences in another language, while for others bilingual as something you can only achieve if you are native-like in both languages.

Yes, I can see how that would happen. I think that it's a concept which looks different if you are a Languages post-graduate. One of our options is in the study of Bilingualism and it's about a very select cohort.

Something I think is important in language learning is to always pitch yourself at the right level, so that you access the right materials for you; for someone of 14, that generally means a specific kind of material, generally something which enables the student to succeed at GCSE level. I think that I would advise a 14 year old to concentrate on the requirements of the GCSE syllabus.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z9dqxnb

I think that some past papers are still available. It's worth looking them up.

I think that I would also advise the poster to listen to French radio. I like France Inter.

https://www.franceinter.fr/
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Kerzen
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(Original post by hffhgghhghg)
my French teacher says I'm fluent in French and I always get over 90, I got 99 as my best on an a level paper. and thanks for the link, but I my school subscribes to that already and I used to get the chez nous one but then I got a bit bored because it wasn't really challenging. I go to the bilingual club and everything and I'm going to do the bilingual IB so idk, but thanks for the info!
That's exceptional for the A Level. How do you manage the literature element? That's one of the hardest part of the A Level.

Are you hoping to pursue a career using your languages?

I was going to suggest a subscription to Le Point, but I think that you might prefer Paris Match. I had a subscription to Paris Match when I did my A Level in French.

https://abonnement.parismatch.com/

https://www.lepoint.fr/

You might find the websites for Le Monde and Le Figaro interesting. I'm not sure that I would advise a subscription to them for you, but you would find the websites interesting.

https://www.lemonde.fr/

https://www.lefigaro.fr/
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oufoufoufouf
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(Original post by Kerzen)
That's exceptional for the A Level. How do you manage the literature element? That's one of the hardest part of the A Level.

Are you hoping to pursue a career using your languages?

I was going to suggest a subscription to Le Point, but I think that you might prefer Paris Match. I had a subscription to Paris Match when I did my A Level in French.

https://abonnement.parismatch.com/

https://www.lepoint.fr/
thank you! I want to do engineering in France, so sort of. I don't really know how I do the literature part, but my French teacher suggested that I did last year's mocks and I just did it 😂 I've still got to focus on GCSE though because I wasn't allowed to do it early because I'm not native...
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Kerzen
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You might find these interesting.

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...9-1-French.pdf

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c..._in_French.pdf

I've bought a lot of my French material from Grant and Cutler, which is now a part of Foyles. Most linguists know about Grant and Cutler. You may find things which are more to your taste in its catalogue.

If you would like something to read, you could read Le Grand Meaulnes by Alain Fournier. It is considered especially suitable for students of French at senior school level.

https://www.grantandcutler.com/book/3766

This is the full French range at Grant and Cutler.

https://www.grantandcutler.com/section/F
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Kerzen
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Re studying Engineering in France, you may wish to look at an Engineering degree with a year abroad. The fee situation for doing an entire degree in France at the point when you can start might make it impossible.

Something like this might suit you better.

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergr...onal-meng.aspx
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oufoufoufouf
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thank you and thank you!
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Kerzen)
Yes, I can see how that would happen. I think that it's a concept which looks different if you are a Languages post-graduate. One of our options is in the study of Bilingualism and it's about a very select cohort.
I studied Bilingualism MA and I'm now doing a Bilingualism PhD, so yeah, I know. :lol:

Take a look at the minimalist and maximalist views of bilingualism for more info.
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Quick-use
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
The term 'bilingual' is subjective. Some people consider themselves bilingual if they know a few sentences in another language, while for others bilingual as something you can only achieve if you are native-like in both languages.
I completely agree - it does depend on the standard.

I'm a native speaker of 2 languages (2 languages which I grew up with simultaneously). At school, I then studied French and Spanish and continued them and began Japanese at university. Even though I always got 100% for every single speaking and writing piece I did for A level French and Spanish, I never considered myself fluent because I knew I wasn't even close. Even after graduating with a degree in them, I'm always cautious about labelling myself as a fluent speaker or a true multilingual. :lol: I've also studied and worked in Japan for 2 years. I initially went to Japan during my third year at Edinburgh University, and I took regular Honour's level modules with Japanese students in modern Japanese literature or philosophy etc, attended all of my seminars and lecturers in Japanese, and wrote all of my essays and exams in the language as well. A few years later, I worked in Tokyo and spoke to my clients and colleagues in Japanese. Ergo, even though I dream and read novels in Japanese, have written academic papers and sat exams in Japanese, and have worked in the country, I'm still not sure that I personally consider myself to actually be fluent. I don't even know what the proper metric for being considered fluent is! Maybe my standards are too high? Or, maybe because I know how actual native speakers are like, I'm too hard on myself?

In any case, hffhgghhghg I'm not sure if you would meet the criteria for being a bilingual speaker of French just yet. You have to remember that A level is only intermediate and not even upper-intermediate. If you choose to do a degree in a foreign language, you'd go onto studying upper-intermediate and advanced French, and then after that there's a whole new world of even more advanced language beyond advanced. :lol: That said, everyone has different standards for language fluency. Even people who've done just a GCSE or who can only produce a single sentence may call themselves fluent or bilingual. I'd just be a little cautious if I were you. :rambo:
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Jeparlepas
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(Original post by Quick-use)
I completely agree - it does depend on the standard.

I'm a native speaker of 2 languages (2 languages which I grew up with simultaneously). At school, I then studied French and Spanish and continued them and began Japanese at university. Even though I always got 100% for every single speaking and writing piece I did for A level French and Spanish, I never considered myself fluent because I knew I wasn't even close. Even after graduating with a degree in them, I'm always cautious about labelling myself as a fluent speaker or a true multilingual. :lol: I've also studied and worked in Japan for 2 years. I initially went to Japan during my third year at Edinburgh University, and I took regular Honour's level modules with Japanese students in modern Japanese literature or philosophy etc, attended all of my seminars and lecturers in Japanese, and wrote all of my essays and exams in the language as well. A few years later, I worked in Tokyo and spoke to my clients and colleagues in Japanese. Ergo, even though I dream and read novels in Japanese, have written academic papers and sat exams in Japanese, and have worked in the country, I'm still not sure that I personally consider myself to actually be fluent. I don't even know what the proper metric for being considered fluent is! Maybe my standards are too high? Or, maybe because I know how actual native speakers are like, I'm too hard on myself?

In any case, hffhgghhghg I'm not sure if you would meet the criteria for being a bilingual speaker of French just yet. You have to remember that A level is only intermediate and not even upper-intermediate. If you choose to do a degree in a foreign language, you'd go onto studying upper-intermediate and advanced French, and then after that there's a whole new world of even more advanced language beyond advanced. :lol: That said, everyone has different standards for language fluency. Even people who've done just a GCSE or who can only produce a single sentence may call themselves fluent or bilingual. I'd just be a little cautious if I were you. :rambo:
Your standards are wayyyy too high. I'd definitely consider you fluent in Japanese.
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oufoufoufouf
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(Original post by Jeparlepas)
Your standards are wayyyy too high. I'd definitely consider you fluent in Japanese.
yeah same!
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Jeparlepas
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To everyone who studied french in university and a level, is it useful? I'm considering it because I know I'll enjoy it but I don't know if it is helpful at all in your career.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Jeparlepas)
To everyone who studied french in university and a level, is it useful? I'm considering it because I know I'll enjoy it but I don't know if it is helpful at all in your career.
Do you have any ideas at the moment about what kind of career might appeal to you, JPP?

There are some careers for which your language skills are the very core of your job - there are roles at the United Nations which would be a good example of this.

https://languagecareers.un.org/dgacm/Langs.nsf/home.xsp

I have generally also suggested the EU for similar opportunities, but I'm not quite sure what the future holds as far as eligibility for those posts is concerned.

https://epso.europa.eu/career-profiles/languages_en

GCHQ has a need for Linguists, although they may ask you to retrain in another language for which there is a more immediate need.

https://www.gchq.gov.uk/section/care...rking-for-gchq

BBC Monitoring has a languages requirement, although I'm not sure what the current language requirement is.

https://monitoring.bbc.co.uk/about

There are more jobs for which a good knowledge of French is a real asset in conjunction with another skill. Engineering and Law are good examples. Other opportunities might exist in, say, hotels or if you were a chef.

There are certain jobs in the Armed Forces for which a knowledge of languages could be useful too, although a French speaker would probably be asked to train in another language as well, Russian, Chinese or Arabic for instance.

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/careers...igence-officer

I personally have found my knowledge of French very useful. I spent some time in Brussels when I was a student, then joined the Civil Service in a role in Whitehall involving the EU which meant going to Brussels with my team. Later on, I worked for one of the companies constructing the Channel Tunnel and then worked for a national newspaper where my job was to look at what had appeared in the European media overnight.

Something I would say to you is that French at A Level is a good choice for people who are good at French. When it comes to applying for University, you need the best grades you can get. If you are good at French and you enjoy the subject, it's a very good choice at A Level and well regarded as a subject.
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