CJ_bangtan
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Is there a link between the reactivity of a metal and their melting/boiling points because with group 1 metals their reactivity increase down the group but melting/boiling points decrease and with the halogen metals its the opposite thing?
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Theloniouss
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Do you know why we see these trends?
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CJ_bangtan
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
Do you know why we see these trends?
Group 1 metals melting/boiling points decrease down the group because the metallic bonding between the ions and the electrons produces a weak attraction and its reactivity increases as the outer electron is easily lost. Whereas with group 7 halogens the reactivity decreases down the group due to the fact that its trying to gain an electron so that it has a full outer shell but as the atom becomes bigger the attractive force needed to gain an electron decreases so it becomes harder to gain a new electron and they also have high melting/boiling points as they go down but I cant seem to figure out why the melting/boiling point is inversely proportional to the reactivity of the metal
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Theloniouss
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(Original post by CJ_bangtan)
Group 1 metals melting/boiling points decrease down the group because the metallic bonding between the ions and the electrons produces a weak attraction and its reactivity increases as the outer electron is easily lost. Whereas with group 7 halogens the reactivity decreases down the group due to the fact that its trying to gain an electron so that it has a full outer shell but as the atom becomes bigger the attractive force needed to gain an electron decreases so it becomes harder to gain a new electron and they also have high melting/boiling points as they go down but I cant seem to figure out why the melting/boiling point is inversely proportional to the reactivity of the metal
Why does the metallic bonding get weaker? And why do the melting/boiling points of halogens increase?
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Deggs_14
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
Why does the metallic bonding get weaker? And why do the melting/boiling points of halogens increase?
For metallic bonding, there is an increasing distance between the outer negative delocalised electrons and the positive nucleus, and the inner shells of electrons "shield" some of the nuclear charge.

For the halogens, the strength of the intermolecular forces (van der waals forces) increases as the diatomic molecule becomes bigger, as there are more electrons, creating a greater instantaneous dipole.

(This is not a super scientific explanation, if anyone can correct me or add any details please do!)
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CJ_bangtan
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
Why does the metallic bonding get weaker? And why do the melting/boiling points of halogens increase?
The metallic bonding gets weaker because the alkali metals only have 1 delocalised electron and the melting/boiling points decrease because the intermolecular forces become weaker and therefore it requires more energy to overcome the forces
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Theloniouss
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(Original post by CJ_bangtan)
The metallic bonding gets weaker because the alkali metals only have 1 delocalised electron and the melting/boiling points decrease because the intermolecular forces become weaker and therefore it requires more energy to overcome the forces
Yes, but why do the intermolecular forces get weaker?
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CJ_bangtan
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
Yes, but why do the intermolecular forces get weaker?
Is it because the electrostatic force of attraction between the nucleus and the ion is weak
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Theloniouss
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(Original post by CJ_bangtan)
Is it because the electrostatic force of attraction between the nucleus and the ion is weak
Nucleus and electrons, yeah
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