How is it studying music at uni

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laila777
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Does anyne study music at uni? What course do you d, how many instruments do you have to play...... etc. What uni do you go to?
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OxMus
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(Original post by laila777)
Does anyne study music at uni? What course do you d, how many instruments do you have to play...... etc. What uni do you go to?
Yes!

I’m a singer, pianist and a bassoonist (in that order). Used to play the guitar as well.

Oxford.

It’s great!

If you’re considering applying for a music course, you should first decide whether you want to apply to a university or a conservatoire – the experiences/courses are very different. It varies between universities, but there is generally a lot less performing at university, and a lot more academic work. In my course, it’s actually possible to complete the degree without performing at all (although nearly everyone performs outside of their degree).

Don’t worry about how many instruments you play – it doesn’t matter at all! Some of my peers play about a million, some play 1 or 2. It’s all good.

Do you have any questions? I’d be delighted to help.
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laila777
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(Original post by OxMus)
Yes!

I’m a singer, pianist and a bassoonist (in that order). Used to play the guitar as well.

Oxford.

It’s great!

If you’re considering applying for a music course, you should first decide whether you want to apply to a university or a conservatoire – the experiences/courses are very different. It varies between universities, but there is generally a lot less performing at university, and a lot more academic work. In my course, it’s actually possible to complete the degree without performing at all (although nearly everyone performs outside of their degree).

Don’t worry about how many instruments you play – it doesn’t matter at all! Some of my peers play about a million, some play 1 or 2. It’s all good.

Do you have any questions? I’d be delighted to help.
On what conditions would you recommend it? If I enjoyed it at GCSE and A level would you recommend it? I've seen some enlish and music courses, Im not sure if it will fulfil my needs. Also, could you let me know what you got in your A levels and GCSE's. Also, d you know anyone with a piano in their dorm (upright). Could you give an outline of the course?
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OxMus
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(Original post by laila777)
On what conditions would you recommend it? If I enjoyed it at GCSE and A level would you recommend it? I've seen some enlish and music courses, Im not sure if it will fulfil my needs. Also, could you let me know what you got in your A levels and GCSE's. Also, d you know anyone with a piano in their dorm (upright). Could you give an outline of the course?
Conditions:
- A level predictions of at least 3 As (check this website for further details: <https://www.music.ox.ac.uk/apply/undergraduate/application-procedure>. The standard offer is 3 As at A level.
- Passion for music. This is really important. If you enjoyed it at GCSE and A level, then yes, it's worth considering.
- You need to have ~Grade 8 skill on your first instrument – the interview includes a 5-minute audition at the Faculty.

GCSEs 11 A*s, A levels A*A*A.

Room:
It varies per college, but normally, every music student will get a piano in their room. It'll probably be an electric Yamaha (this is actually better than having an upright because you can plug your headphones in and play late at night if you have to. And if you want to do real piano practice, you'd be better off practising in the Faculty anyway).

Course:
This website <https://www.music.ox.ac.uk/apply/undergraduate/course-structure> gives you an overview of the course, although it is a little out of date (2015). I'm attaching a PDF summary of my first-year course (2019).

Some explanatory points:
- Critical Listening consists of listening to a piece of popular music/electronic music/sound art (they give you a choice of three), creating an analytical diagram and attaching a short commentary. Accounts for very few marks, so there's scope to go a bit crazy if you want.
- Machaut was a prolific 14th-century composer, secretary, and poet, and probably the most important European musician of his time – interesting, but challenging stuff.
- Foundations: essentially studying the values and political forces that shape, and have shaped musicology.
- Extended Essay: a coursework essay on a topic of your choice; 4,000–5,000

I hope this helps!
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laila777
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(Original post by OxMus)
Conditions:
- A level predictions of at least 3 As (check this website for further details: <https://www.music.ox.ac.uk/apply/undergraduate/application-procedure>. The standard offer is 3 As at A level.
- Passion for music. This is really important. If you enjoyed it at GCSE and A level, then yes, it's worth considering.
- You need to have ~Grade 8 skill on your first instrument – the interview includes a 5-minute audition at the Faculty.

GCSEs 11 A*s, A levels A*A*A.

Room:
It varies per college, but normally, every music student will get a piano in their room. It'll probably be an electric Yamaha (this is actually better than having an upright because you can plug your headphones in and play late at night if you have to. And if you want to do real piano practice, you'd be better off practising in the Faculty anyway).

Course:
This website <https://www.music.ox.ac.uk/apply/undergraduate/course-structure> gives you an overview of the course, although it is a little out of date (2015). I'm attaching a PDF summary of my first-year course (2019).

Some explanatory points:
- Critical Listening consists of listening to a piece of popular music/electronic music/sound art (they give you a choice of three), creating an analytical diagram and attaching a short commentary. Accounts for very few marks, so there's scope to go a bit crazy if you want.
- Machaut was a prolific 14th-century composer, secretary, and poet, and probably the most important European musician of his time – interesting, but challenging stuff.
- Foundations: essentially studying the values and political forces that shape, and have shaped musicology.
- Extended Essay: a coursework essay on a topic of your choice; 4,000–5,000

I hope this helps!
Thanks a lot! Although I am starting my a levels, I am not sure whether to do music or english at uni
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OxMus
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(Original post by laila777)
Thanks a lot! Although I am starting my a levels, I am not sure whether to do music or english at uni
That's ok! You're still in the early stages, so no need to worry.

I didn't make up my mind until after I applied to university! That is, I applied to read maths, realised my error, took a gap year and applied for music. But I had a great time in my gap year, and it couldn't have worked out better.


Please don't stress about it – I promise it will be alright!
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laila777
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(Original post by OxMus)
That's ok! You're still in the early stages, so no need to worry.

I didn't make up my mind until after I applied to university! That is, I applied to read maths, realised my error, took a gap year and applied for music. But I had a great time in my gap year, and it couldn't have worked out better.


Please don't stress about it – I promise it will be alright!
Thanks!
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