Clinical vs. Counselling Psychology

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spoony2799
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I am beginning to look at what path to pursue after my undergrad degree (I'm doing BSc Psychology). I would like to go into the mental health assessment/therapy side of psychology. I'm confused what the difference is between clinical and counselling psychology. I have tried to google in but the difference has not been made very clear.

Can anyone advise what the difference is between the two please and what potential pros/cons there are of each. Thank you
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wastedcuriosity
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So I did some research and by the looks of it, clinical psychologists work with people with more serious mental health issues, like psychosis whilst counsellors work with more mentally healthy people, people suffering with anxiety, depression etc. I think clinical psychologists also more often work in the NHS, hospitals etc while counsellors often have their own businesses, work in schools, unis and the NHS sometimes too.

I'm pretty sure a career in clinical psychology requires more training than one in counselling - not sure you even need a degree to be a counsellor (could be wrong though, but I think it's just a training course). Clinical psychology is also very competitive I've been told
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Sophie9600
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Hello!

So Clinical Psychologists are responsible for the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of behavioural issues and mental health disorders, often will work in NHS/Private health. Counsellors typically will work privately in education, businesses, etc and will provide a certain type of therapy/counselling for a variety of issues e.g. anxiety, marital problems, etc.

To become a clinical psychologist is takes AGES, like at the very least 7 years study. You will need buckets of experience (like years and possibly published research), a masters degree and a Doctorate. This is achievable but you need to be sure its what exactly you want as its incredibly competitive to get into. If you're interested predominately in treating individuals via therapy for less severe mental health issues, counselling is probably the best route to go. What is required depends on what area you're working in and who is employing you. Many will do PGD/PGC's. My friend is doing the counselling route, she has gained employment at at private counselling business and is completing a PGC in counselling at Uni.

I am interested in Clinical Psychology, partially assessment/interventions, so I am about to start my Masters in Clinical Health Psychology whilst volunteering as a Counsellor.

Hope that helps!
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s144177
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Sorry if this is not relevant to your question. But, I'm doing my A-levels and I'm considering clinical psychology. How was your psychology undergraduate like? Is it a lot harder that A-levels?
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Sophie9600
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(Original post by s144177)
Sorry if this is not relevant to your question. But, I'm doing my A-levels and I'm considering clinical psychology. How was your psychology undergraduate like? Is it a lot harder that A-levels?
Generally I found the first year of most subjects at uni, including Psychology, to be the same sort of content as A-Level but with more topics. I found 1st year exams extremely easy as it consisted of short essay and multiple choice questions which was a lot easier than A-Level. The content and what is expected of you gets harder every year but obviously your knowledge and skills grow alongside that. For my year 3 and 4 exams (counted towards my degree) my exams were completely essay based (random topic from entire unit, i.e. perception, cognitive psychology, counselling etc) and you're expected to have vast and detailed knowledge of concepts with of recent studies to back up everything you say. It was challenging but if you have an interest in Psychology and you don't mind essays it's great.
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s144177
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(Original post by Sophie9600)
Generally I found the first year of most subjects at uni, including Psychology, to be the same sort of content as A-Level but with more topics. I found 1st year exams extremely easy as it consisted of short essay and multiple choice questions which was a lot easier than A-Level. The content and what is expected of you gets harder every year but obviously your knowledge and skills grow alongside that. For my year 3 and 4 exams (counted towards my degree) my exams were completely essay based (random topic from entire unit, i.e. perception, cognitive psychology, counselling etc) and you're expected to have vast and detailed knowledge of concepts with of recent studies to back up everything you say. It was challenging but if you have an interest in Psychology and you don't mind essays it's great.
Thank you that was really helpful.
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