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    Hey! I'm having some problems with writing the full ionic equation of the reaction between calcium carbonate and nitric acid.

    I understand that:

    Metal carbonate + acid --> salt + water + carbon dioxide

    Thus:

    CaCO3(s) + 2HNO3(aq) --> Ca(NO3)2(aq) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

    So, then putting in the aqueous ions:

    CaCO3(s) + 2H+(aq) + NO32-(aq) --> Ca2+(aq) + NO32-(aq) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

    Cancelling the spectator ions:

    CaCO3(s) + 2H+(aq) --> Ca2+(aq) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

    So, is this it? I believe so, given that CaCO3(s) is a solid, and H2O(l) and CO2(g) are covalently bonded. Am I wrong? The mark scheme to the question that posed this problem says I am!
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    Its safe to assume that the aqueous acid would dissolve the calcium carbonate
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    That is mainly correct.
    However when you put in the aqueous ions you couldnt have NO3 2-, you would have 2NO3 1-.

    The rest of the equations are correct.
    CaCO3 is a solid, H2O and CO2 are both covelently bonded.

    What does the markscheme say is wrong?
 
 
 
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